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(1/16) How repaired rotator cuff function influences Constant scoring.

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(2/16) Anatomical and functional segments of the deltoid muscle.

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(3/16) Arthroscopic release of the deltoid contracture.

BACKGROUND: The deltoid contracture is an uncommon disorder. Long-standing contracture produces winged scapula, abduction and extension contracture of the shoulder. Surgical release has been considered the treatment of choice. However, the method of approach has not been well defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of arthroscopic release of the deltoid contracture. METHODS: A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the results of arthroscopic release in six patients (seven shoulders) who had a contracture of the deltoid muscle. All patients had arthroscopic release. The abduction-contracture and horizontal-adduction angle was measured after operation. The average duration of follow-up was 16 months (range, from 4 to 41 months). RESULTS: The preoperative abduction contracture resolved completely in three shoulders. Two had a residual abduction contracture of 5 degrees to 7 degrees and two had a poor result with 15 degrees abduction-contracture angle. The average postoperative abduction-contracture angle was 6 degrees (range, 0 degrees to 15 degrees ). The preoperative horizontal-adduction contracture was corrected, permitting at least 130 degrees of adduction, in five shoulders. The remaining two shoulders had a postoperative horizontal-adduction angle of 120 degrees and 110 degrees . Overall, the average postoperative horizontal-adduction angle was 130 degrees (range, 110 degrees to 140 degrees ). CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic release is an effective surgical technique to treat the deltoid contracture.  (+info)

(4/16) A biomechanical study of a suture between the deltoid muscle and a free tendon graft for reconstruction of the elbow extension.

AIMS: It is possible to reconstruct the elbow motion in tetraplegic patients using the posterior portion of the deltoid muscle. In this surgery however, it is a problem to achieve a firm suture between the deltoid muscle and the tendon graft which extends the muscle and is sewn in order to compensate for the plegic musculus triceps brachii function. This study assesses two methods of attachment between muscle and free tendon graft from the biomechanical point of view. METHODS: The assessment was made on 7 fresh-frozen cadaveric samples where the rear portion of the deltoid muscle was sewn with the strip of fascia lata (A1-A7) and 7 samples (B1-B7) where the free tendon graft was attached with a strengthened part of deltoid fascia. The character of the attachment defect was evaluated as strength and elongation parameters using the device Zwick Z020-TND. RESULTS: The ANOVA showed a statistically significant greater suture solidity connecting the muscle and tendon for group B (B1-B7) than group A. The deformation of the actual suture location was smaller in group B than the deformation of attachment surroundings. CONCLUSION: From the biomechanical solidity point of view, it is more efficient to use the strengthened fascia of the deltoid muscle on its inner side for the suture with the tendon graft for reconstruction of the elbow extension in tetraplegic patients.  (+info)

(5/16) Electromyographic activity of shoulder muscles during exercises performed with oscillatory and non-oscillatory poles.

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(6/16) An evidence based protocol for the prevention of upper arm injury related to vaccine administration (UAIRVA).

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(7/16) Relationship between humeral geometry and shoulder muscle power among suspensory, knuckle-walking, and digitigrade/palmigrade quadrupedal primates.

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(8/16) Thin-filament length correlates with fiber type in human skeletal muscle.

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