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(1/6133) Transformation of intestinal epithelial cells by chronic TGF-beta1 treatment results in downregulation of the type II TGF-beta receptor and induction of cyclooxygenase-2.

The precise role of TGF-beta in colorectal carcinogenesis is not clear. The purpose of this study was to determine the phenotypic alterations caused by chronic exposure to TGF-beta in non-transformed intestinal epithelial (RIE-1) cells. Growth of RIE-1 cells was inhibited by >75% following TGF-beta1 treatment for 7 days, after which the cells resumed a normal growth despite the presence of TGF-beta1. These 'TGF-beta-resistant' cells (RIE-Tr) were continuously exposed to TGF-beta for >50 days. Unlike the parental RIE cells, RIE-Tr cells lost contact inhibition, formed foci in culture, grew in soft agarose. RIE-Tr cells demonstrated TGF-beta-dependent invasive potential in an in vitro assay and were resistant to Matrigel and Na-butyrate-induced apoptosis. The RIE-Tr cells were also tumorigenic in nude mice. The transformed phenotype of RIE-Tr cells was associated with a 95% decrease in the level of the type II TGF-beta receptor (TbetaRII) protein, a 40-fold increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein, and 5.9-fold increase in the production of prostacyclin. Most RIE-Tr subclones that expressed low levels of TbetaRII and high levels of COX-2 were tumorigenic. Those subclones that express abundant TbetaRII and low levels of COX-2 were not tumorigenic in nude mice. A selective COX-2 inhibitor inhibited RIE-Tr cell growth in culture and tumor growth in nude mice. The reduced expression of TbetaRII, increased expression of COX-2, and the ability to form colonies in Matrigel were all reversible upon withdrawal of exogenous TGF-beta1 for the RIE-Tr cells.  (+info)

(2/6133) Down-regulation of oxytocin-induced cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin F synthase expression by interferon-tau in bovine endometrial cells.

Oxytocin (OT) is responsible for the episodic release of luteolytic prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha from the uterus in ruminants. The attenuation of OT-stimulated uterine PGF2alpha secretion by interferon-tau (IFN-tau) is essential for prevention of luteolysis during pregnancy in cows. To better understand the mechanisms involved, the effect of recombinant bovine IFN-tau (rbIFN-tau) on OT-induced PG production and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and PGF synthase (PGFS) expression in cultured endometrial epithelial cells was investigated. Cells were obtained from cows at Days 1-3 of the estrous cycle and cultured to confluence in RPMI medium supplemented with 5% steroid-free fetal calf serum. The cells were then incubated in the presence or absence of either 100 ng/ml OT or OT+100 ng/ml rbIFN-tau for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. OT significantly increased PGF2alpha and PGE2 secretion at all time points (p < 0.01), while rbIFN-tau inhibited the OT-induced PG production and reduced OT receptor binding in a time-dependent manner. OT increased the steady-state level of COX-2 mRNA, measured by Northern blot, which was maximal at 3 h (9-fold increase) and then decreased with time (p < 0.01). OT also caused an increase in COX-2 protein, which peaked at 12 h (11-fold increase), as measured by Western blot. Addition of rbIFN-tau suppressed the induction of COX-2 mRNA (89%, p < 0.01) and COX-2 protein (50%, p < 0.01) by OT. OT also increased PGFS mRNA, and this stimulation was attenuated by rbIFN-tau (p < 0.01). To ensure that the decrease in COX-2 was not solely due to down-regulation of the OT receptor, cells were stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate; PMA) in the presence and absence of rbIFN-tau. The results showed that rbIFN-tau also decreased PMA-stimulated PG production and COX-2 protein. It can be concluded that rbIFN-tau inhibition of OT-stimulated PG production is due to down-regulation of OT receptor, COX-2, and PGFS.  (+info)

(3/6133) Mechanisms of prostaglandin E2 release by intact cells expressing cyclooxygenase-2: evidence for a 'two-component' model.

Prostaglandin (PG) release in cells expressing constitutive cyclooxygenase-1 is known to be regulated by liberation of arachidonic acid by phospholipase A2 followed by metabolism by cyclooxygenase. However, the relative contribution of phospholipase A2 to the release of PGs in cells expressing cyclooxygenase-2 is not clear. We addressed this question by using radioimmunoassay to measure PGE2 release by human cells (A549) induced to express cyclooxygenase-2 (measured by Western blot analysis) by interleukin-1beta. Cells were either unstimulated or stimulated with agents known to activate phospholipase A2 (bradykinin, Des-Arg10-kallidin, or the calcium ionophore A23187) or treated with exogenous arachidonic acid. When cells were treated to express cyclooxygenase-2, the levels of PGE2 released over 15 min were undetectable; however, in the same cells stimulated with bradykinin, A23187, or arachidonic acid, large amounts of prostanoid were produced. Using selective inhibitors/antagonists, we found that the effects of bradykinin were mediated by B2 receptor activation and that prostanoid release was due to cyclooxygenase-2, and not cyclooxygenase-1, activity. In addition, we show that the release of PGE2 stimulated by either bradykinin, A23187, or arachidonic acid was inhibited by the phospholipase A2 inhibitor arachidonate trifluoromethyl ketone. Hence, we have demonstrated that PGE2 is released by two components: induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and supply of substrate, probably via activation of phospholipase A2. This is illustrated in A549 cells by a clear synergy between the cytokine interleukin-1beta and the kinin bradykinin.  (+info)

(4/6133) Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 induced by lipopolysaccharide and peroxisomal proliferators.

Primary cultures of fetal hepatocytes expressed cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) upon stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peroxisomal proliferators. This enzyme was active and a good correlation between the mRNA levels, the amount of protein, and the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was observed. However, when cells were incubated in the presence of indomethacin or the COX-2-specific inhibitor NS398, the amount of COX-2 protein increased 5-fold after activation with LPS and 2-fold after treatment with clofibrate. This up-regulation of COX-2 was not observed at the mRNA level. The mechanism of protein accumulation might involve either a direct stabilization of the enzyme by the inhibitors or the absence of prostaglandins involved in the regulation of its turnover. Among the prostaglandins assayed, only 15-deoxy-Prostaglandin J2 exerted a statistically significant decrease in the COX-2 levels in cells stimulated with LPS or LPS plus NS398. The accumulation of COX-2 in the presence of inhibitors was also observed in peritoneal macrophages treated under identical conditions. These results indicate that COX-2 protein accumulates after enzyme inhibition, and because removal of the inhibitors restored the enzyme activity, suppression of treatment with reversible COX-2 inhibitors may cause a transient overproduction of prostaglandins.  (+info)

(5/6133) Characterization of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ketorolac and its enantiomers in the rat.

The marked analgesic efficacy of ketorolac in humans, relative to other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), has lead to speculation as to whether additional non-NSAID mechanism(s) contribute to its analgesic actions. To evaluate this possibility, we characterized (R,S)-ketorolac's pharmacological properties in vivo and in vitro using the nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors [indomethacin (INDO) and diclofenac sodium (DS)] as well as the selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, as references. The potency of racemic (R,S)-ketorolac was similar in tests of acetic acid-induced writhing, carrageenan-induced paw hyperalgesia, and carrageenan-induced edema formation in rats; ID50 values = 0.24, 0. 29, and 0.08 mg/kg, respectively. (R,S)-ketorolac's actions were stereospecific, with (S)-ketorolac possessing the biological activity of the racemate in the above tests. The analgesic potencies for (R,S)-, (S)-, and (R)-ketorolac, INDO, and DS were highly correlated with their anti-inflammatory potencies, suggesting a common mechanism. (R,S)-ketorolac was significantly more potent than INDO or DS in vivo. Neither difference in relative potency of COX inhibition for (R,S)-ketorolac over INDO and DS nor activity of (S)-ketorolac at a number of other enzymes, channels, or receptors could account for the differences in observed potency. The distribution coefficient for (R,S)-ketorolac was approximately 30-fold less than for DS or INDO, indicating that (R,S)-ketorolac is much less lipophilic than these NSAIDs. Therefore, the physicochemical and pharmacokinetics properties of (R,S)-ketorolac may optimize the concentrations of (S)-ketorolac at its biological target(s), resulting in greater efficacy and potency in vivo.  (+info)

(6/6133) Oxidative bioactivation of the lactol prodrug of a lactone cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

The lactol derivative of a lactone cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (DFU) was evaluated in vivo and in vitro for its potential suitability as a prodrug. DFU-lactol was found to be 10 to 20 times more soluble than DFU in a variety of aqueous vehicles. After administration of DFU-lactol at 20 mg kg-1 p.o. in rats, a Cmax of 7.5 microM DFU was reached in the plasma. After oral administration, the ED50s of DFU-lactol in the carrageenan-induced paw edema and lipopolysaccharide-induced pyresis assays in rats are comparable with the ED50s observed when dosing with DFU. Incubations of DFU-lactol with rat and human hepatocytes demonstrated that the oxidation of DFU-lactol can be mediated by liver enzymes and that a competing pathway is direct glucuronidation of the DFU-lactol hydroxyl group. Assays with subcellular fractions from rat liver indicated that most of the oxidation of DFU-lactol occurs in the cytosolic fraction and requires NAD(P)+. Human liver cytosol can also support the oxidation of DFU-lactol to DFU when NAD(P)+ is added to the incubations. Fractionation of human liver cytosolic proteins showed that at least three enzymes are capable of efficiently effecting the oxidation of DFU-lactol to DFU. Incubations with commercially available dehydrogenases suggest that alcohol and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are involved in this oxidative process. These data together suggest that lactols may represent useful prodrugs for lactone-containing drugs.  (+info)

(7/6133) Arachidonic acid in platelet microparticles up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin formation via a protein kinase C/mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

Activation of platelets results in shedding of membrane microparticles (MP) with potentially bioactive properties. Platelet MP modulate platelet, monocyte, and vascular endothelial cell function, both by direct effects of MP arachidonic acid (AA) and by its metabolism to bioactive prostanoids. We have previously reported that platelet MP induce expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and prostacyclin production in monocytes and endothelial cells. To elucidate further the molecular mechanisms that underlie MP-induced up-regulation of COX-2 expression, we investigated the response of a human monocytoid (U-937) cell line to platelet MP stimulation. In U-937 cells, MP-induced COX-2 expression and eicosanoid formation is prevented by pharmacological inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), PI 3-kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 kinase. Treatment with the PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 also blocked MP-induced p42/p44 MAPK, p38, and JNK1 phosphorylation. Conversely, platelet MP stimulation of U-937 cells results in direct activation of PKC, p42/p44 MAPK, p38 kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as activation of the transcription factors c-Jun and Elk-1. However, MP failed to activate the cAMP response element. Activation of U-937 cells by MP induces translocation of classical (PKCbeta), novel (PKCdelta) and atypical (PKCzeta and PKClambda) isozymes of PKC from the cytosol to the membrane, with concomitant activation of downstream MAPK. While MP-induced activation of p42/p44 MAPK and p38 kinase is transient, a sustained activation of JNK1 was observed. Although PKC activation is required for MP-induced p42/p44 MAPK, activation of the stress kinases p38 and JNK1 was PKC-independent. The fatty acid fraction of the MP accounted for these effects, which were mimicked by MP AA. Rather than acting directly via nuclear receptors, MP AA activates COX-2-dependent prostaglandin production by a PKC/p42/p44 MAPK/p38 kinase-sensitive pathway in which PI 3-kinase plays a significant role. MP AA also stimulates transcriptional activation of COX-2 as well as c-Jun and Elk-1.  (+info)

(8/6133) Coordinate regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 and TGF-beta1 in replication error-positive colon cancer and azoxymethane-induced rat colonic tumors.

Evidence is accumulating which indicates that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We evaluated the expression of COX-2 in replication error-positive (RER) colon cancers, colon cancers metastatic to liver and azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat colonic tumors. Immunohistochemistry showed that COX-2 was low to undetectable in normal human mucosa, but abundant in the RER adenocarcinomas we examined. COX-2 immunoreactivity in metastatic colon cancers was less abundant, but clearly detectable. In the colon of AOM-treated rats, COX-2 protein was not detectable in normal mucosa, but present in most of the epithelial cells comprising the tumors. The TGF-beta1 staining pattern in these human and rat tumors was similar to that observed for COX-2. The role of TGF-beta in RER adenocarcinomas is complex because of the increased mutation rate of TGF-beta type II receptors. Northern analysis showed abundant TGF-beta1 mRNA in AOM-induced tumors, but not in paired mucosa. TGF-beta1 induced the expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Chronic TGF-beta1 treatment caused a TGF-beta-dependent overexpression of COX-2 in rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE-1). TGF-beta1 may regulate COX-2 expression during the colonic adenoma to carcinoma sequence.  (+info)