Cor triatriatum sinistrum--description and review of four cases. (25/34)

Cor triatriatum sinistrum is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly in which the left atrium is divided into two compartments by a fibromuscular membrane. In most cases, the two cavities communicate through one or more openings. It is generally associated with other cardiac anomalies. The clinical manifestations depend mainly on the size of the fibromuscular membrane orifice(s) and the pressure gradient between the two cavities. The authors present four cases of cor triatriatum sinistrum diagnosed in different clinical contexts and age-groups. In all cases the diagnosis was based on echocardiographic findings (transthoracic and transesophageal) and was supplemented by other imaging modalities.  (+info)

Cor Triatriatum Sinister diagnosed in adult life with three dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. (26/34)

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Cor triatriatum presenting as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: a case report. (27/34)

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Cor triatriatum dexter: unusual features in utero and after birth. (28/34)

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Cor triatriatum dexter: antemortem diagnosis in an adult by cross sectional echocardiography. (29/34)

Cor triatriatum dexter is a rare cardiac abnormality in which the right atrium is subdivided into two distinct chambers. This anomaly is generally attributed to the persistence of the right sinus venosus valve and it is frequently associated with severe malformations of other right heart structures. The antemortem diagnosis of the membrane may be difficult and its presence is often only established at necropsy. In a woman of 56 with Ebstein's anomaly the echocardiographic features of cor triatriatum dexter were examined before and during cardiac catheterisation. These investigations showed the position of the membrane, that there was no gradient between the two atrial chambers, and that there were perforations in the centre of the membrane.  (+info)

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to diagnosis in a 20-month old girl with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure. (30/34)

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Incidental discovery of an unusual right atrial membrane in an adult patient. (31/34)

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Preoperative assessment of cor triatriatum in an adult by dynamic three dimensional echocardiography was more informative than transoesophageal echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. (32/34)

Classic cor triatriatum is rarely found in adults. Preoperative assessment of classic cor triatriatum in a 22 year old man without symptoms by three dimensional echocardiography was more informative than transoesophageal echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging, which both showed only a small hole in the membrane separating the accessory atrium from the true left atrium. The size of the hole indicated a strong likelihood that symptoms would develop in this patient. Dynamic three dimensional echocardiography, however, showed a long wide hole in the separating membrane. This finding was consistent with the absence of symptoms in this patient. Symptom free patients with moderate obstruction do not need early surgical correction.  (+info)