Unfinished feticide: the ethical problems. (1/7)

Dr. Jansen's paper raises three main issues. The one with which he himself is most concerned is the question of which methods of abortion are ethically right, and whether methods which risk the birth of a damaged baby are wrong. But there are two others: first, how the (originally unintended) birth of a live but damaged child alters the moral situation, and secondly, whether the overcoming of sterility by inducing a multiple pregnancy in which some of the fetuses have to be killed in order for any of them to survive is at all morally acceptable.  (+info)

Unfinished feticide: a legal commentary. (2/7)

Jansen expresses concern as to the legal implications of both selective reduction of pregnancy and unsuccessful attempts at termination of pregnancy using mifepristone. This commentary examines the legality of both procedures and concludes that Jansen is over-optimistic in his belief that neither procedure is likely to fall foul of the criminal laws on induced abortion. By contrast his anxieties about civil liability arising from the subsequent live birth of a damaged infant are, it is suggested, unnecessarily pessimistic. Such an action is most unlikely to succeed if brought by the infant herself and any claim on the part of the mother will normally be dependent on proof of negligence. The commentary focusses on the law in England with relevant references to other common law jurisdictions.  (+info)

Paternalism versus autonomy: medical opinion and ethical questions in the treatment of defective neonates.(3/7)

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Death by judiciary order.(4/7)

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No right to sue for "wrongful life.(5/7)

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Supplementary annual report of Council, 1982-1983: medical ethics.(6/7)

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One man's burden.(7/7)

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