The efficacy of a herbal-based toothpaste in the control of plaque and gingivitis: a clinico-biochemical study. (17/27)

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Chemical analysis and biological activity of the essential oils of two endemic Soqotri Commiphora species. (18/27)

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Prevention of endotoxin-induced uveitis in rats by plant sterol guggulsterone. (19/27)

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Evaluation of oleo-gum resin as directly compressible tablet excipient and release retardant. (20/27)

The present study was designed to study drug release retardant property of myrrh oleo-gum resin from tablets prepared by direct compression method (without binding agent). The tablets were evaluated for various physical tests viz. hardness, friability, tensile strength and drug content. Accelerated stability testing was carried out according to ICH guidelines. Batch F-VII showed 041% friability, 6 kg/cm2 hardness and 0.961 MN/m2 tensile strength. In vitro dissolution studies were performed and different empirical models were applied to drug release data for evaluating the drug release mechanisms and kinetics. A criterion for selecting the most appropriate model was based on linearity (coefficient of correlation). The in vitro release data fit well to the Hixson Crowell model (r2 value ranged from 0.9771 to 0.9945) indicating the drug release mechanism to be surface erosion, effected through water diffusion, polymer hydration, disentanglement and dissolution. In conclusion, myrrh-oleo-gum resin was found to be a suitable directly compressible tablet excipients having release modifying property.  (+info)

Reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis by gugulipid extract of Ayurvedic medicine plant Commiphora mukul in human prostate cancer cells is regulated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase. (21/27)

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Inhibition of EGFR-STAT3 signaling with erlotinib prevents carcinogenesis in a chemically-induced mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma. (22/27)

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Guggulsterone (GS) inhibits smokeless tobacco and nicotine-induced NF-kappaB and STAT3 pathways in head and neck cancer cells. (23/27)

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Acute liver failure caused by 'fat burners' and dietary supplements: a case report and literature review. (24/27)

Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, nonconventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful.  (+info)