The use of herbal preparations to alleviate climacteric disorders and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in a German case-control study. (73/121)

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Study of general practice consultations and menopausal problems. Oxford General Practitioners Menopause Study Group. (74/121)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the nature of work related to the menopause in general practice. DESIGN: Questionnaire study over six months among general practitioners after each consultation with a woman aged 40-69 at which issues related to the climacteric had been discussed. SETTING: 9 General practices in the Oxford area. SUBJECTS: 416 Women who had 572 consultations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age, menopausal state, and first or subsequent consultation. Symptoms were classified together with the treatment and the outcome of the consultation. RESULTS: The consultation rate varied greatly between practices, the overall rate being 4.4%. There were many premenopausal women and women in their 60s presenting; women with hysterectomies presented more often--36% (37/103) of women with hysterectomies had more than one consultation compared with 26% (38/144) for premenopausal women and 24% (38/155) for postmenopausal women. 409 women had symptoms and 218 were prescribed oestrogen treatment. 156 of the consultations involved discussion and advice only. Only four women were referred to a local specialist clinic. CONCLUSION: There is a low overall use of hormone replacement therapy in the general postmenopausal population despite the recent media coverage of its benefits in the prevention of osteoporosis and subsequent fractures.  (+info)

Consumption of a flaxseed-rich food is not more effective than a placebo in alleviating the climacteric symptoms of postmenopausal women. (75/121)

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Quality of care and health-related quality of life of climacteric stage women cared for in family medicine clinics in Mexico. (76/121)

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Effects of Trifolium pratense on the climacteric and sexual symptoms in postmenopause women. (77/121)

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Integrative health care model for climacteric stage women: design of the intervention. (78/121)

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LHRH analogue for treatment of recurrent and refractory mastalgia. (79/121)

The LHRH analogue Zoladex was used to treat 21 premenopausal women with severe recurrent or refractory breast pain. Severity and pattern of mastalgia, whether cyclical or non-cyclical, was assessed using self-administered record cards. Symptom relief was achieved in 17 (81%) of the patients. This study showed Zoladex to be an effective short-term treatment for refractory and recurrent mastalgia.  (+info)

Relation between plasma hormone profiles, symptoms, and response to oestrogen treatment in women approaching the menopause. (80/121)

Out of a consecutive series of 300 patients seen at a menopause clinic, 82 complained of symptoms generally associated with the climacteric, although they were still menstruating. Vasomotor disturbances were absent in 42 of these patients (group 1) and present in 40 (group 2). Headaches, insomnia, and dyspareunia were the most common complaints among the women with vasomotor symptoms, whereas loss of libido and depression predominated in those without. Conjugated equine oestrogens (Premarin) 1.25 mg daily given for three weeks out of four relieved nearly all symptoms in group 2, but in group 1 the response was disappointing. The mean plasma oestradiol concentration in women with vasomotor symptoms was significantly lower than that observed during days 1-10 of the menstrual cycle, but plasma testosterone values were not significantly different from those observed in younger women. Plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH) concentrations were similar to those seen after the menopause. Concentrations of these hormones in the women without vasomotor symptoms were similar to those in the younger, regularly menstruating women. After six months of oestrogen treatment patients in group 2 had a 2.1-fold increase in mean plasma oestradiol concentration, and plasma FSH and LH concentrations were reduced to 39% and 66% of their pretreatment values respectively; in group 1, however, no such pronounced changes occurred. High concentrations of FSH were present in patients with oestrogen-responsive symptoms, 15 U/1 being the diagnostic cut-off point. This measurement in the presence of characteristic symptoms therefore constitutes the best method of selecting patients for oestrogen-replacement therapy.  (+info)