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(1/1049) Insertion of excised IgH switch sequences causes overexpression of cyclin D1 in a myeloma tumor cell.

Oncogenes are often dysregulated in B cell tumors as a result of a reciprocal translocation involving an immunoglobulin locus. The translocations are caused by errors in two developmentally regulated DNA recombination processes: V(D)J and IgH switch recombination. Both processes share the property of joining discontinuous sequences from one chromosome and releasing intervening sequences as circles that are lost from progeny cells. Here we show that these intervening sequences may instead insert in the genome and that during productive IgH mu-epsilon switch recombination in U266 myeloma tumor cells, a portion of the excised IgH switch intervening sequences containing the 3' alpha-1 enhancer has inserted on chromosome 11q13, resulting in overexpression of the adjacent cyclin D1 oncogene.  (+info)

(2/1049) Multipoint oligogenic analysis of age-at-onset data with applications to Alzheimer disease pedigrees.

It is usually difficult to localize genes that cause diseases with late ages at onset. These diseases frequently exhibit complex modes of inheritance, and only recent generations are available to be genotyped and phenotyped. In this situation, multipoint analysis using traditional exact linkage analysis methods, with many markers and full pedigree information, is a computationally intractable problem. Fortunately, Monte Carlo Markov chain sampling provides a tool to address this issue. By treating age at onset as a right-censored quantitative trait, we expand the methods used by Heath (1997) and illustrate them using an Alzheimer disease (AD) data set. This approach estimates the number, sizes, allele frequencies, and positions of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). In this simultaneous multipoint linkage and segregation analysis method, the QTLs are assumed to be diallelic and to interact additively. In the AD data set, we were able to localize correctly, quickly, and accurately two known genes, despite the existence of substantial genetic heterogeneity, thus demonstrating the great promise of these methods for the dissection of late-onset oligogenic diseases.  (+info)

(3/1049) Abnormalities at 14q32.1 in T cell malignancies involve two oncogenes.

The TCL1 oncogene on human chromosome 14q32.1 is involved in the development of T cell leukemia in humans. Its expression in these leukemias is activated by chromosomal translocations and inversions at 14q32.1. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a new member of the TCL1 gene family, TCL1b, located approximately 16 kb centromeric of TCL1. The 1.2-kb TCL1b cDNA encodes a 14-kDa protein of 128 aa and shows 60% similarity to Tcl1. Expression profiles of TCL1 and TCL1b genes are very similar: both genes are expressed at very low levels in normal bone marrow and peripheral lymphocytes but are activated in T cell leukemia by rearrangements of the 14q32.1 region. Thus, translocations and inversions at 14q32. 1 in T cell malignancies involve two oncogenes.  (+info)

(4/1049) Detection of t(14;18) carrying cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood from patients affected by non-lymphoid diseases.

AIMS/BACKGROUND: To assess the presence of bcl-2/JH rearrangements in bone marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients affected by diseases other than malignant lymphomas. The t(14;18) (q32;q21) translocation, which juxtaposes the bcl-2 oncogene on chromosome 18 and the JH segment of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes on chromosome 14, is found frequently in follicular lymphomas. METHODS: A sensitive semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect t(14;18) translocation in bone marrow aspirates and peripheral blood lymphocytes from 48 patients. In 137 additional individuals peripheral blood lymphocytes only were tested. RESULTS: Cells carrying bcl-2/JH rearrangements were detected in about a quarter of the bone marrow samples and half of the peripheral blood lymphocyte samples. In seven patients, t(14;18) positive cells were found in both the bone marrow and peripheral blood lymphocyte samples. The size of the PCR products and bcl-2/JH DNA sequence analysis showed that the same t(14;18) carrying clone was present in the bone marrow and the corresponding peripheral blood lymphocyte samples in three of these seven patients. Some patients had more than one bcl-2/JH rearrangement. There was no significant correlation between age and the translocation incidence. Cells carrying the t(14;18) translocation were present in peripheral blood lymphocyte samples with a similar incidence--between 47% and 52% in all age groups from 20 to 79 years. Patients older than 80 years had a lower (37%) but not significantly different incidence. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that patients affected by non-lymphoid diseases may have several t(14;18) carrying cells and some of them undergo a clonal expansion. Whether individuals with t(14;18) positive cells are at a higher risk of lymphoid malignancies remains unanswered and further epidemiological studies are required.  (+info)

(5/1049) De novo deletion (14)(q11.2q13) including PAX9: clinical and molecular findings.

A 3 year old boy with a de novo deletion (14)(q11.2q13) of paternal origin encompassing the region from D14S264 to D14S70 is described. The patient presented with severe psychomotor retardation, bilateral cleft lip/palate, bilateral colobomas of the optic nerves and retinas, agenesis of the corpus callosum, pes calcaneovarus, reduced oesophageal peristalsis, and swallowing difficulties. This is the first reported case of PAX9 hemizygosity in humans. Haploinsufficiency of the PAX9 gene might be expected to cause some of the developmental defects and the dysphagia. Another haploinsufficiency candidate gene, the bZIP transcription factor gene NRL, which is specifically expressed in neuronal cells and the eye during embryogenesis, was excluded from the deletion interval.  (+info)

(6/1049) Rec8p, a meiotic recombination and sister chromatid cohesion phosphoprotein of the Rad21p family conserved from fission yeast to humans.

Our work and that of others defined mitosis-specific (Rad21 subfamily) and meiosis-specific (Rec8 subfamily) proteins involved in sister chromatid cohesion in several eukaryotes, including humans. Mutation of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe rec8 gene was previously shown to confer a number of meiotic phenotypes, including strong reduction of recombination frequencies in the central region of chromosome III, absence of linear element polymerization, reduced pairing of homologous chromosomes, reduced sister chromatid cohesion, aberrant chromosome segregation, defects in spore formation, and reduced spore viability. Here we extend the description of recombination reduction to the central regions of chromosomes I and II. We show at the protein level that expression of rec8 is meiosis specific and that Rec8p localizes to approximately 100 foci per prophase nucleus. Rec8p was present in an unphosphorylated form early in meiotic prophase but was phosphorylated prior to meiosis I, as demonstrated by analysis of the mei4 mutant blocked before meiosis I. Evidence for the persistence of Rec8p beyond meiosis I was obtained by analysis of the mutant mes1 blocked before meiosis II. A human gene, which we designate hrec8, showed significant primary sequence similarity to rec8 and was mapped to chromosome 14. High mRNA expression of mouse and human rec8 genes was found only in germ line cells, specifically in testes and, interestingly, in spermatids. hrec8 was also expressed at a low level in the thymus. Sequence similarity and testis-specific expression indicate evolutionarily conserved functions of Rec8p in meiosis. Possible roles of Rec8p in the integration of different meiotic events are discussed.  (+info)

(7/1049) Correlation of bcl-2 rearrangement with clinical characteristics and outcome in indolent follicular lymphoma.

The t(14;18) translocation, which involves the bcl-2 oncogene, occurs in follicular lymphomas (FL) at two common sites: the major breakpoint region (MBR) and the minor cluster region (mcr). The biological and clinical significance of these breakpoints is unknown. The bcl-2 breakpoint site was determined in 247 previously untreated patients (49% men; median age 52 years) with indolent FL (155 grade I, 83 grade II, and 8 grade III) to correlate it with pretreatment characteristics, response, and outcome. The bcl-2 breakpoint site was determined by a polymerase chain reaction method of peripheral blood (all cases), bone marrows (149 cases), and fresh lymph node biopsy specimens (68 cases). The breakpoint site occurred at MBR in 175 cases (71%) and at mcr in 27 (11%). In 45 cases (18%), no breakpoint was detected (germline). No significant relationship was found between the rearrangements and the expression of BLC-2 and BAX proteins. Patients' germline for MBR and mcr tended to present more frequently with stage IV disease and higher beta2-microglobulin (beta2M) levels, whereas mcr-rearranged patients presented more frequently with early stage and normal beta2M. The complete response rate of germline patients was significantly lower than that of MBR and mcr patients. An estimated 3-year failure-free survival (FFS) for mcr, MBR, and germline cases was 95%, 76%, and 57%, respectively (P <.001). The bcl-2 breakpoint site was independent of serum beta2M and lactate dehydrogenase in its correlation with FFS. In conclusion, the bcl-2 rearrangement site is an important prognostic factor in indolent FL, useful to identify patients who may require different treatment.  (+info)

(8/1049) Structural organization of the human Elk1 gene and its processed pseudogene Elk2.

In the ets gene family of transcription factors, ELK1 belongs to the subfamily of Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) which bind to the Serum Response Element (SRE) in conjunction with a dimer of Serum Response Factors (SRFs). The primary structure of the human Elk1 gene was determined by genomic cloning. The gene structure of Elk1 spans 15.2 kb and consists of seven exons and six introns. The coding sequence resides on exons 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Sequencing of cDNA clones isolated from human hippocampus library revealed that the second exon was often skipped by an alternative splicing event. All introns commenced with nucleotides GT at the 5' boundary and ended with nucleotides AG at the 3' boundary, in agreement with the proposed consensus sequence for intron spliced donor and acceptance sites. Sequence inspection of the 5'-flanking region revealed the absence of a 'TATA' box and the presence of putative cis-acting regulatory elements such as Sp1, GATA-1, CCAAT, and c-Myb. Moreover, the sequence analysis of Elk2 locus on 14q32.3 confirmed that Elk2 gene corresponds to a processed pseudogene of Elk1 which has been reported between alpha 1 gene (IGHA1) and pseudo gamma gene (IGHGP) of immunoglobulin heavy chain. Furthermore, the results of Southern analysis using DNAs from human-mouse hybrid cell lines carrying a part of 14q32 region revealed that there is another locus hybridizing to Elk1 cDNA on 14q32.2 --> qter region in addition to Elk2 locus between IGHA1 and IGHGP loci.  (+info)