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(1/1054) Double gallbladder originating from left hepatic duct: a case report and review of literature.

BACKGROUND: Double gallbladder is a rare anomaly of the biliary tract. Double gallbladder arising from the left hepatic duct was previously reported only once in the literature. CASE REPORT: A case of symptomatic cholelithiasis in a double gallbladder, diagnosed on preoperative ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP) is reported. At laparoscopic cholangiography via the accessory gallbladder no accessory cystic duct was visualized. After conversion to open cholecystectomy, the duplicated gallbladder was found to arise directly from the left hepatic duct; it was resected and the duct repaired. CONCLUSIONS: We emphasize that a careful intraoperative cholangiographic evaluation of the accessory gallbladder is mandatory in order to prevent inadvertent injury to bile ducts, since a large variety of ductal abnormality may exist.  (+info)

(2/1054) Carcinoids of the common bile duct: a case report and literature review.

Carcinoids of the extrahepatic bile ducts and particularly the common bile duct are extremely rare. A 65-year-old woman presented with obstructive jaundice. Laboratory and imaging studies gave results that were consistent with an obstructing lesion in the common bile duct. In this case, a stent was inserted initially to decompress the bile ducts. Subsequently a laparotomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy were performed and a tissue diagnosis of carcinoid of the common bile duct was made. The patient was well with no evidence of recurrence 17 months postoperatively. The authors believe this is the 19th reported case of an extrahepatic bile duct carcinoid.  (+info)

(3/1054) Review article: antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

This review examines the evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopan-creatography (ERCP), and provides detailed advice about suitable antibiotic regimens in appropriate high-risk patients. Ascending cholangitis and infective endocarditis are potential complications of endoscopic ERCP. The pathophysiology of these two complications is quite separate and different sub-groups of patients require prophylaxis with appropriate antibiotic regimens. Ascending cholangitis results from bacterial infection of an obstructed biliary system, usually from enteric Gram-negative microorganisms, resulting in bacteraemia. There is incomplete drainage of the biliary system after ERCP in up to 10% of patients who require stenting. Antibiotics started in these patients will probably reduce the frequency of cholangitis by 80%. If antibiotics are restricted to this group, approximately 90% of all patients having an ERCP will avoid antibiotics, but 80% of cholangitic episodes will be prevented. Infective endocarditis may result from the bacteraemia caused at the time of the ERCP in patients with an abnormal heart valve. Antibiotic prophylaxis, in particular covering alpha-haemolytic streptococci, should be started before the procedure in this defined high-risk group.  (+info)

(4/1054) Investigation of bile ducts before laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

BACKGROUND: Since the advent of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, there has been controversy about the investigation of the bile ducts and the management of common bile duct stones. Routine peroperative cholangiography (POC) in all cases has been recommended. We have adopted a policy of not performing routine POC, and the results of 700 cases are reported. METHODS: Since 1990, all patients have undergone preoperative ultrasound scan. We have performed selective preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) because of a clinical history of jaundice and/or pancreatitis, abnormal liver function tests and ultrasound evidence of dilated bile ducts (N=78, 11.1%). The remaining 622 patients did not have a routine POC, but selective peroperative cholangiogram (POC) was performed only in 42 patients (6%) because of unsuccessful ERCP or mild alteration in the criteria for the presence of bile duct stones. The remaining 580 patients did not undergo POC. Careful dissection of Calot's triangle was performed in all cases to reduce the risk of bile duct injuries. RESULTS: The overall operative complications, postoperative morbidity and mortality was 1.71%, 2.14% and 0.43%, respectively. Bile duct injuries occurred in two patients (0.26%) and both were recognized during the operation and repaired. There was a single incidence of retained stone in this series of 700 cases (0.14%), which required postoperative ERCP. CONCLUSIONS: This policy of selective preoperative ERCP, and not routine peroperative cholangiogram, is cost effective and not associated with significant incidence of retained stones or bile duct injuries after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.  (+info)

(5/1054) Gastrointestinal surgical workload in the DGH and the upper gastrointestinal surgeon.

Workload implications of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) subspecialisation within the district general hospital (DGH) have been assessed by prospective data collection over a 12-month period in a DGH with six general surgeons serving a population of 320,000. The single UGI surgeon (UGIS) performed all ten oesophageal resections, ten of 11 gastric resections for malignancy and all eight pancreatic operations. He also performed 91 of the 182 cholecystectomies, 164 of the 250 endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatograms (ERCP) and all endoscopic procedures for the palliation of unresected oesophageal tumours. The UGIS was responsible for the management of all patients with severe pancreatitis, yet he also performed 51 colorectal resections over the 12-month period. Successful management of severely ill patients with upper GI disease requires consultant supervision on a day-to-day basis. If such UGI disease is to be managed in the DGH, two surgeons with UGI experience will be required if high quality care and reasonable working conditions are to be achieved. Such UGIS will continue to perform some colorectal surgery.  (+info)

(6/1054) Early ERCP is an essential part of the management of all cases of acute pancreatitis.

The role of early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy in acute pancreatitis is controversial. Recent randomised controlled trials mostly support the value of this procedure, but concerns remain as to its safety, efficacy and practicability. This debate critically assesses the evidence for and against the use of early ERCP in acute pancreatitis.  (+info)

(7/1054) Syntactic analysis and languages of shape feature description in computer-aided diagnosis and recognition of cancerous and inflammatory lesions of organs in selected x-ray images.

We present new algorithms for the recognition of morphologic changes and shape feature analysis, which have been proposed to be used in a diagnosis of pathologic symptoms characteristic of cancerous and inflammatory lesions. These methods have been used so far for early detection and diagnosis of neoplastic changes in pancreas and chronic pancreatitis based on x-ray images acquired by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Preliminary processing of x-ray images involves binarization, and, subsequently, pancreatic ducts shown in the pictures are subjected to the straightening transformation, which enables obtaining two-dimensional width graphs that show contours of objects with their morphologic changes. Recognition of such changes was performed using attributed context-free grammars. Correct description and diagnosis of some symptoms (e.g., large cavitary projections) required two-dimensional analysis of width graphs. In such cases, languages of shape feature description with special multidirectional sinquad distribution were additionally applied.  (+info)

(8/1054) Ultrasonographic evaluation of the common bile duct in biliary acute pancreatitis patients: comparison with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

We compared the morphologic findings of the common bile duct by ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with biliary acute pancreatitis. Forty-five patients were studied. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was based on the presence of characteristic abdominal pain associated with an elevation of serum amylase and lipase concentrations. All patients underwent ultrasonography and subsequently urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and eventually endoscopic sphincterotomy. Ultrasonography showed gallstones in 33 patients and sludge of the gallbladder in seven patients. In the common bile duct, lithiasis was found in two patients and sludge in 25. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed choledocolithiasis in eight patients and sludge of the common bile duct in 32. In 27 cases (60%) concordance occurred between ultrasonographic and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic detection of lithiasis or sludge of the common bile duct. The average diameter of the common bile duct determined by sonography was significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than that obtained by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The evaluation of this parameter indicated that a good correlation existed between the values obtained with the two techniques (r(s) = 0.765, P < 0.001). Both ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography can provide reliable measurements of the common bile duct diameter. Ultrasonography is the technique of choice in the initial investigation of patients with biliary acute pancreatitis.  (+info)