Saliva proteins of vector Culicoides modify structure and infectivity of bluetongue virus particles. (73/150)

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Estimating front-wave velocity of infectious diseases: a simple, efficient method applied to bluetongue. (74/150)

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Tibrogargan and Coastal Plains rhabdoviruses: genomic characterization, evolution of novel genes and seroprevalence in Australian livestock. (75/150)

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Screening of oomycete fungi for their potential role in reducing the biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) larval populations in Hervey Bay, Queensland, Australia. (76/150)

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Modelling the effects of past and future climate on the risk of bluetongue emergence in Europe. (77/150)

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Assessment of vector/host contact: comparison of animal-baited traps and UV-light/suction trap for collecting Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), vectors of Orbiviruses. (78/150)

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Detection of bluetongue virus serotype 17 in Culicoides variipennis by nucleic acid blot and sandwich hybridization techniques. (79/150)

Molecular hybridization techniques were developed for the detection and surveillance of bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 17 in the insect vector Culicoides variipennis, a biting midge. Radiolabeled RNA and cDNA probes were generated from sequences of the L3 segment of BTV serotype 17. These probes were used to detect BTV RNA in pools of infected C. variipennis by hybridizing the probes directly to analyte immobilized on nylon membranes or by using a nucleic acid sandwich hybridization test. Hybridization procedures were able to detect 1 infected C. variipennis in a pool of 50 and as little as 3.55 log10 50% tissue culture infective doses per ml of virus. These hybridization techniques provide an alternative to virus isolation for the surveillance of BTV in vector populations.  (+info)

Further studies on bluetongue and bluetongue-related orbiviruses in the Sudan. (80/150)

The seasonal incidence of bluetongue virus (BTV) in Central Sudan is related primarily to fluctuations in the prevalence of the vector, Culicoides imicola. Population densities of this midge begin to rise with the onset of precipitation and peak during October, before falling sharply at the end of the rainy season in November. These are also the months of BTV transmission. Populations of C. schultzei, the commonest midge in Central Sudan, are also related to the rainy season but this species does not seem to be involved with BTV transmission. BTV serotype 2 was isolated from C. imicola confirming the status of this midge as a known vector but a second isolate of the same serotype was made from a mixed pool of Culicoides not including C. imicola. This suggests that BTV transmission in the Sudan may involve more than one species of Culicoides. Epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 4 and a palyam virus were isolated from C. schultzei which indicates that this species may be involved in the transmission of BT-related viruses. Seven further virus isolates from sentinel calves at Shambat (Khartoum) confirmed the presence of BTV serotypes 1, 4 and 16, and an untyped EHDV (designated 318) in the Sudan. All of the viruses isolated and identified during the course of this work are recorded from the Sudan for the first time.  (+info)