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(1/3043) Sustained reduction in the carriage of Neisseria meningitidis as a result of a community meningococcal disease control programme.

The effect of a community intervention programme of antibiotics and meningitis vaccine on pharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis was investigated. Carriage rates were determined in pupils at both secondary schools (ages 11-18 years) included in the community intervention programme and compared with two schools outside the area matched for socio-economic status. A total of 1869 pupils were studied 6 months after the programmes, and 2457 pupils after 11 months. Six months after the programme was completed there was a 72% reduction in pharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis in pupils attending the schools in the intervention area compared with pupils in the control schools. After 11 months this difference persisted in the 11-14 age group but not in the 15-18 age group. No resistance to the antibiotics used in the programme was found. A community intervention programme of antibiotics and vaccine for the control of meningococcal disease led to a long-term reduction in Neisseria meningitidis carriage in some age groups.  (+info)

(2/3043) Acquisition and carriage of meningococci in marine commando recruits.

Meningococcal acquisition is a prerequisite for invasive disease. Three hundred and eleven male marine commando recruits were studied throughout 29 weeks of basic training to identify factors influencing meningococcal carriage and acquisition including troop number, season, smoking, respiratory infection, antibiotic usage and nasopharyngeal bacterial interference flora. A high carriage rate on entry to training (118/311, 37.9%) and subsequent sustained high rates of meningococcal acquisition were found. Of the potential factors examined, only active and passive smoking were found to be associated significantly with meningococcal carriage on entry. The association between active smoking and meningococcal carriage was dose-dependent, with odds ratios (OR) of 2.2 (95% CIs 1.0-4.8) and 7.2 (95% CIs 2.3-22.9) for light and heavy smokers respectively. Passive smoking predisposed independently to carriage (OR 1.8, 95% CIs 1.1-3.0). Active and passive smoking combined to give an attributable risk for meningococcal carriage of 33%. In contrast, despite a high and sustained rate of meningococcal acquisition in the study population, none of the risk factors investigated, including active smoking, was associated significantly with meningococcal acquisition. No cases of meningococcal disease occurred during the 16-month study period. Therefore smoking may increase the duration of meningococcal carriage rather than the rate of acquisition, consistent with the increased risk of meningococcal disease from passive as opposed to active smoking. Public health measures that reduce the prevalence of smoking should reduce the risk of meningococcal disease.  (+info)

(3/3043) Previous respiratory tract infections and antibiotic consumption in children with long- and short-term carriage of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Previous respiratory tract infections (RTI) and antibiotics consumption as possible risk factors for extended duration of PRP carriage were investigated in 24 children (cases) with previous carriage of penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP) for a duration exceeding 120 days (median 168 days) and a control group of 53 children with a duration of PRP carriage less than 90 days (median 21 days). The cases had experienced 0.99 episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) per life-year compared to 0.79 episodes in the controls (P = 0.32). For antibiotic-treated RTI other than AOM, the corresponding numbers were 0.49 and 0.29 episodes per life-year, respectively (P = 0.01). No differences in antibiotic consumption in the 3 months preceding the carriage, nor during the carriage period were noted. Other factors than impaired host defence to respiratory tract pathogens or antibiotics consumption seem to be more important in determining the duration of PRP carriage.  (+info)

(4/3043) Core promoter mutations and genotypes in relation to viral replication and liver damage in East Asian hepatitis B virus carriers.

Virus load and liver damage, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and histology activity index, were related to genotype and core promoter mutations in 43 chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers of East Asian origin. T-1762 mutants were more frequent in genotype C strains and were associated with more inflammation (P=.0036) and fibrosis (P=.0088) of the liver but not with hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) status or virus load. Conversely, precore mutations were associated with less liver inflammation (P=. 08), which was linked to HBeAg negativity and lower viral replication. Carriers with genotype C were more often HBeAg positive (P=.03) with precore wild type strains and more-severe liver inflammation (P=.009) than were those with genotype B. These findings suggest that pathogenic differences between genotypes may exist and that the T-1762 mutation may be useful as a marker for progressive liver damage but seem to contradict that down-regulation of HBeAg production is the major effect of this mutation.  (+info)

(5/3043) Carriage of GB virus C/hepatitis G virus RNA is associated with a slower immunologic, virologic, and clinical progression of human immunodeficiency virus disease in coinfected persons.

The prevalence of GB virus C (GBV-C) infection is high in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons. However, the long-term consequences of coinfection are unknown. HIV-positive persons with a well-defined duration of infection were screened on the basis of their GBV-C/hepatitis G virus (HGV) RNA status and studied. GBV-C/HGV viremia was observed in 23, who carried the virus over a mean of 7.7 years. All parameters (survival, CDC stage B/C, HIV RNA load, CD4 T cell count) showed significant differences in terms of the cumulative progression rate between persons positive and negative for GBV-C/HGV RNA. When GBV-C/HGV RNA-positive and -unexposed subjects were matched by age, sex, baseline HIV RNA load, and baseline CD4 T cell count, HIV disease progression appeared worse in GBV-C/HGV RNA-negative subjects. The carriage of GBV-C/HGV RNA is associated with a slower progression of HIV disease in coinfected persons.  (+info)

(6/3043) Development of a serologic assay to detect Taenia solium taeniasis.

We developed a serologic assay to identify adult Taenia solium tapeworm carriers using excretory/secretory (TSES) antigens collected from in vitro cultured T. solium tapeworms. To identify taeniasis-specific antigens we used an immunoblot assay with serum samples from T. solium tapeworm carriers and cysticercosis patients. Antigens were identified that reacted with antibodies present in serum samples from taeniasis cases and not with those from cysticercosis patients. Using serum samples collected from persons with confirmed T. solium tapeworm infections, the test was determined to be 95% (69 of 73) sensitive. Serum samples (n = 193) from persons with other parasitic infections, including T. saginata tapeworm infections, do not contain cross-reacting antibodies to TSES, indicating that the assay is 100% specific. These data suggest that the immunoblot assay using TSES antigens can be used to identify persons with current or recent T. solium tapeworm infections and provides a new, important tool for epidemiologic purposes, including control and prevention strategies.  (+info)

(7/3043) Nosocomial group A streptococcal infections associated with asymptomatic health-care workers--Maryland and California, 1997.

Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a common cause of pharyngitis and uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections, can cause serious invasive infections (including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome [STSS]) and death. Since 1965, at least 15 postoperative or postpartum GAS outbreaks attributed to asymptomatic carriage in health-care workers (HCWs) have been reported. This report describes two nosocomial outbreaks of GAS infection in Maryland and California during 1996-1997; the findings suggest that early infection-control measures that include active surveillance may interrupt transmission and prevent morbidity and mortality.  (+info)

(8/3043) Factors associated with pharyngeal carriage of Neisseria meningitidis among Israel Defense Force personnel at the end of their compulsory service.

In this 1 year cross-sectional study of personnel being discharged from compulsory military service, an available database of health-related information was used to examine the association of meningococcal carriage with socio-demographic factors. A representative, systematic sample of 1632 personnel was interviewed and had throat cultures taken. The overall meningococcal carriage rate was 16%. Serogroups B and Y accounted for 76% and 13% of the isolates respectively. In univariate analysis, carriage was associated with male gender (P < 0.0001), < 12 years school education (P = 0.002), smoking (P = 0.014), and service at a 'closed' base, reflecting greater interpersonal contact (P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, only service on a closed base and male gender retained significance. School education of < 12 years remained significant for females only. Variables not associated with carriage included number of siblings, intensity of smoking, and use of the contraceptive pill. In this setting, meningococcal carriage was associated with the type of base on which soldiers served; and smoking was not an independent risk factor for carriage.  (+info)