Chronic myelogenous leukemia--progress at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center over the past two decades and future directions: first Emil J Freireich Award Lecture. (1/430)

The purpose of this study was to review the progress in clinical and translational research in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) over the past 20 years at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The CML database updating the clinical and basic research investigations was reviewed as the source of this report. Publications resulting from these investigations were summarized. The long-term results with intensive chemotherapy, IFN-alpha therapy alone or in combination, autologous stem cell transplantation, and new agents such as homoharringtonine and decitabine showed encouraging results. Biological studies related to the BCR-ABL molecular abnormality, other molecular events, and the detection of minimal residual disease were detailed. Future strategies with potential promise in CML were outlined. Significant progress in understanding CML biology and in treating patients afflicted with the disease has occurred. Several therapeutic and research tools are currently investigated, which should hopefully improve further the prognosis of patients with CML.  (+info)

Initial experience with sentinel node biopsy in breast cancer at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. (2/430)

BACKGROUND: Axillary lymph node dissection is an important procedure in the surgical treatment of breast cancer. Axillary lymph node dissection is still performed in over half of breast cancer patients having histologically negative nodes, regardless of the morbidity in terms of axillary pain, numbness and lymphedema. The first regional lymph nodes draining a primary tumor are the sentinel lymph nodes. Sentinel node biopsy is a promising surgical technique for predicting histological findings in the remaining axillary lymph nodes, especially in patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer, and a worldwide feasibility study is currently in progress. METHODS: Intraoperative lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy were performed in the axilla by subcutaneous injection of blue dye (indigocarmine) in 88 cases of stage 0-IIIB breast cancer. Sentinel lymph nodes were identified by detecting blue-staining lymph nodes or dye-filled lymphatic tracts after total or partial mastectomy. Finally, axillary lymph node dissection was performed up to Levels I and II or more. RESULTS: Sentinel lymph nodes were successfully identified in 65 of the 88 cases (74%). In the final histological examination, the sentinel lymph nodes in 40 cases were negative, including four cases with non-sentinel-node-positive breast cancer (specificity, 100%; sensitivity, 86%). In nine (31%) of the 29 cases with histologically node-positive breast cancer, the sentinel lymph nodes were the only lymph nodes affected. Axillary lymph node status was accurately predicted in 61 (94%) of the 65 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Although it was the initial experience at the National Cancer Center Hospital East, sentinel node biopsy proved feasible and successful. This method may be a reasonable alternative to the standard axillary lymph node dissection in patients with early breast cancer.  (+info)

Impact of the treating institution on survival of patients with "poor-prognosis" metastatic nonseminoma. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Genito-Urinary Tract Cancer Collaborative Group and the Medical Research Council Testicular Cancer Working Party. (3/430)

BACKGROUND: Because metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell cancer is a rare but treatable cancer, we have explored whether there is an association between the experience of the treating institution with this disease and the long-term clinical outcome of the patients, particularly patients with a poor prognosis. METHODS: We analyzed data on 380 patients treated in one of 49 institutions participating in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/ Medical Research Council randomized trial of four cycles of bleomycin-etoposide-cisplatin followed by two cycles of etoposide-cisplatin versus three cycles of bleomycin-vincristine-cisplatin followed by three cycles of etoposide-ifosfamide-cisplatin-bleomycin, both treatment regimens given with or without filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor). Institutions were divided into four groups based on the total number of patients entered in the trial. The groups were compared by use of the Cox proportional hazards model stratified for treatment with filgrastim and for patient prognosis as defined by the International Germ Cell Consensus Classification Group. With the use of this classification, only 65 % of the patients had a poor prognosis. RESULTS: Patients treated in the 26 institutions that entered fewer than five patients into the trial had an overall survival that was statistically significantly worse (two-sided P = .010; hazard ratio = 1.85; 95% confidence interval = 1.16-3.03) than that of patients treated in the 23 institutions that entered five patients or more. Overall survival and failure-free survival were similar among institutions that entered at least five patients. The observed effect may be related to differences in adherence to the chemotherapy protocol and in the frequency and extent of surgery for residual masses, although only the differences in dose intensity achieved statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated in institutions that entered fewer than five patients into the trial appeared to have poorer survival than those treated in institutions that entered a larger number of patients with "poor-prognosis" nonseminoma.  (+info)

Incremental costs of enrolling cancer patients in clinical trials: a population-based study. (4/430)

BACKGROUND: Payment for care provided as part of clinical research has become less predictable as a result of managed care. Because little is known at present about how entry into cancer trials affects the cost of care for cancer patients, we conducted a matched case-control comparison of the incremental medical costs attributable to participation in cancer treatment trials. METHODS: Case patients were residents of Olmsted County, MN, who entered phase II or phase III cancer treatment trials at the Mayo Clinic from 1988 through 1994. Control patients were patients who did not enter trials but who were eligible on the basis of tumor registry matching and medical record review. Sixty-one matched pairs were followed for up to 5 years after the date of trial entry for case patients or from an equivalent date for control patients. Hospital, physician, and ancillary service costs were estimated from a population-based cost database developed at the Mayo Clinic. RESULTS: Trial enrollees incurred modestly (no more than 10%) higher costs over various follow-up periods. The mean cumulative 5-year cost in 1995 inflation-adjusted U.S. dollars among trial enrollees after adjustment for censoring was $46424 compared with $44 133 for control patients. After 1 year, trial enrollee costs were $24645 compared with $23 964 for control patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that cancer chemotherapy trials may not imply budget-breaking costs. Cancer itself is a high-cost illness. Clinical protocols may add relatively little to that cost.  (+info)

Influence of data display formats on physician investigators' decisions to stop clinical trials: prospective trial with repeated measures. (5/430)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the method of data display on physician investigators' decisions to stop hypothetical clinical trials for an unplanned statistical analysis. DESIGN: Prospective, mixed model design with variables between subjects and within subjects (repeated measures). SETTING: Comprehensive cancer centre. PARTICIPANTS: 34 physicians, stratified by academic rank, who were conducting clinical trials. INTERVENTIONS: PARTICIPANTS were shown tables, pie charts, bar graphs, and icon displays containing hypothetical data from a clinical trial and were asked to decide whether to continue the trial or stop for an unplanned statistical analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Percentage of accurate decisions with each type of display. RESULTS: Accuracy of decisions was affected by the type of data display and positive or negative framing of the data. More correct decisions were made with icon displays than with tables, pie charts, and bar graphs (82% v 68%, 56%, and 43%, respectively; P=0.03) and when data were negatively framed rather than positively framed in tables (93% v 47%; P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Clinical investigators' decisions can be affected by factors unrelated to the actual data. In the design of clinical trials information systems, careful consideration should be given to the method by which data are framed and displayed in order to reduce the impact of these extraneous factors.  (+info)

An audit of primary surgical treatment for women with ovarian cancer referred to a cancer centre. (6/430)

Ovarian cancer is the commonest cause of gynaecological cancer death in the UK, and guidelines for initial surgery and staging of this disease are widely available. We report a retrospective audit of the surgical management of patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer referred to the Christie Cancer Centre in Manchester in 1996. The aim was to assess compliance with surgical guidelines. The authors found that the majority of patients (92%) presented via an outpatient clinic and for these individuals surgery was therefore elective. This mode of presentation should allow management by a small number of dedicated gynaecologists at each hospital, but up to seven consultants in each hospital performed surgery on a relatively small number of patients. Furthermore, less than half the patients underwent the recommended surgical procedure. Although some patients may have 'inoperable' disease, these data suggest that a greater compliance with national and international guidelines are required to provide an optimal level of care.  (+info)

A comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care: preliminary psychometric analysis in an oncology institute in Italy. (7/430)

BACKGROUND: Little is known about patients' perception of the quality of the care they receive in oncology hospitals. We developed a 61-item comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care (CASC) to evaluate the competence of hospital physicians and nurses, as well as aspects of care organisation and hospital environment. The aims of this study were to define the structure of the CASC and assess the internal consistency and convergent and discriminant validity of its scales. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Three hundred ninety-five consecutive cancer patients discharged from an oncology institute in Italy were asked to complete the CASC at home and return it in a self-addressed envelope. RESULTS: Two percent of the patients refused to participate and 25% failed to return the questionnaire. Separate factor analyses of the CASC sub-scales disclosed the perceived extent of doctors' and nurses' availability, coordination, human quality, technical competence, provision of psychosocial care and information, as well as the patients' general satisfaction, perception of the organisation of their care, access and comfort. Multi-trait scaling analysis was carried out on item-grouping resulting from factor analyses. High levels of internal consistency and convergent validity were obtained but discriminant validity could be improved. CONCLUSIONS: Results of present psychometric testing of the CASC forecast adequate properties. This will be confirmed by repeating these analyses in a cross-cultural setting.  (+info)

Molecular characterization of a nosocomial outbreak of human respiratory syncytial virus on an adult leukemia/lymphoma ward. (8/430)

Although nosocomial transmission of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and its effect on morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised adults are well recognized, few studies have applied molecular techniques to differentiate nosocomial from community-acquired infections. Between January and April 1997, an outbreak of HRSV occurred among adult patients in a leukemia/lymphoma ward. Among 45 hospitalized patients undergoing bronchoscopy for investigation of acute respiratory illness, 8 were identified with HRSV infection. One infected patient developed symptoms before admission and was thought to be the index case. However, subsequent sequencing of 7 HRSV isolates identified 2 distinct genotypes, GA5 (1 case) and GB3 (6 cases). The 6 GB3 isolates could be further differentiated into 2 strains with identical nucleotide sequences that differed from each other and from 14 community HRSV isolates. Instead of a single nosocomial outbreak of HRSV, multiple introductions of HRSV likely occurred with distinct lines of nosocomial transmission.  (+info)