Effectiveness of previous mumps vaccination during a summer camp outbreak. (33/65)

OBJECTIVES: Mumps is a vaccine-preventable disease that may cause outbreaks. In July 2005, an outbreak of mumps occurred during a children's summer camp in upstate New York. An investigation was initiated to describe the cases and evaluate vaccine effectiveness. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 541 children from the United States and abroad who attended a 1- or 2-month overnight summer camp. Patients with mumps were interviewed; serologic analysis was conducted for 6 case patients. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated by retrospective review of immunization records for 507 attendees who were eligible for vaccination and had verified immunization history. RESULTS: Thirty-one camp attendees were identified as having mumps (attack rate: 5.7%); 5 (83%) of 6 patients tested had positivity for mumps immunoglobulin M. Of the 507 participants (including 29 patients) with available immunization history, 440 (including 16 [87%] patients) were 2-dose recipients of mumps vaccine (attack rate: 3.6%); 46 participants (including 4 [9%] patients) were 1-dose recipients (attack rate: 8.7%); and 21 (including 9 [4%] patients) were unvaccinated (attack rate: 42.9%). Vaccine effectiveness was 92% for 2 doses and 80% for 1 dose. CONCLUSIONS: Outbreaks of mumps in settings such as summer camps can occur despite high vaccination rates. Vaccine effectiveness for 2 mumps vaccinations was greater than vaccine effectiveness for 1 mumps vaccination. Therefore, recommendation of 2 mumps vaccinations for summer camp participants continues to be appropriate. Control of mumps disease relies on broad vaccination coupled with correct clinical diagnosis and strict control measures.  (+info)

High day-to-day glucose variability: a frequent phenomenon in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes attending summer camp. (34/65)

 (+info)

Educational camp for children with asthma. (35/65)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a 5-day educational camp program for children with asthma in terms of improving their knowledge of asthma and enhancing their performance in the use of inhaled medication and in physical activities. METHODS: Every day, the children received 20-min interactive educational sessions, the technique for using the metered-dose inhaler was reviewed, two peak flow readings were recorded, and the children performed physical activities that included breathing and relaxation exercises. A questionnaire regarding knowledge of asthma, as well as asthma triggers, asthma medications, misconceptions regarding asthma, and the use of spacers, was administered before and after the intervention. Correct use of inhaled medication and exercise-related symptoms were also evaluated before and after the intervention. RESULTS: A total of 37 children with asthma, aged 8-10 years (15 females and 22 males), were included in this study. Of those, 25% showed an improvement in the level of knowledge of asthma after the educational camp program, as evidenced by the greater number of correct answers on three of the twelve questions analyzed (p < 0.05). The exercise-related dyspnea scores decreased significantly (p < 0.05). The ability to use inhaled medication correctly was significantly improved after the intervention (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The asthma educational camp program can improve knowledge about specific questions, encourage participation in physical activities, and improve the asthma management skills of children.  (+info)

Neuroendocrine regulation and physical and relational aggression: the moderating roles of child maltreatment and gender. (36/65)

 (+info)

A diabetes camp as the service-learning capstone experience in a diabetes concentration. (37/65)

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of a service-learning advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in a diabetes camp to improve student confidence in diabetes knowledge and related skills DESIGN: Pharmacy students assisted medical staff during a week-long diabetes camp for children. Students participated in all aspects of diabetes care, as well as wrote pre- and post-camp reflection papers, completed online quizzes, presented an educational training session, and completed pre- and post-camp survey instruments. ASSESSMENT: Students' confidence in their diabetes knowledge and patient care skills increased as a result of participating in the camp. CONCLUSION: A diabetes camp APPE improved students' confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage diabetes, and allowed them to gain experience working with an interdisciplinary team in a unique real-world environment.  (+info)

A camp-based intervention targeting independence among individuals with spina bifida. (38/65)

 (+info)

Impact of gluten-free camp on quality of life of children and adolescents with celiac disease. (39/65)

 (+info)

Camp jump start: effects of a residential summer weight-loss camp for older children and adolescents. (40/65)

 (+info)