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(1/5496) GM-CSF-deficient mice are susceptible to pulmonary group B streptococcal infection.

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene-targeted mice (GM-/-) cleared group B streptococcus (GBS) from the lungs more slowly than wild-type mice. Expression of GM-CSF in the respiratory epithelium of GM-/- mice improved bacterial clearance to levels greater than that in wild-type GM+/+ mice. Acute aerosolization of GM-CSF to GM+/+ mice significantly enhanced clearance of GBS at 24 hours. GBS infection was associated with increased neutrophilic infiltration in lungs of GM-/- mice, while macrophage infiltrates predominated in wild-type mice, suggesting an abnormality in macrophage clearance of bacteria in the absence of GM-CSF. While phagocytosis of GBS was unaltered, production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide was markedly deficient in macrophages from GM-/- mice. Lipid peroxidation, assessed by measuring the isoprostane 8-iso-PGF2alpha, was decreased in the lungs of GM-/- mice. GM-CSF plays an important role in GBS clearance in vivo, mediated in part by its role in enhancing superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production and bacterial killing by alveolar macrophages.  (+info)

(2/5496) Molecular detection of tumor cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with early stage lung cancer.

BACKGROUND: Conventional cytologic analysis of sputum is an insensitive test for the diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have recently demonstrated that polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular methods are more sensitive than cytologic analysis in diagnosing bladder cancer. In this study, we examined whether molecular assays could identify cancer cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. METHODS: Tumor-specific oncogene mutations, CpG-island methylation status, and microsatellite alterations in the DNA of cells in BAL fluid from 50 consecutive patients with resectable (stages I through IIIa) NSCLC were assessed by use of four PCR-based techniques. RESULTS: Of 50 tumors, 28 contained a p53 mutation, and the identical mutation was detected with a plaque hybridization assay in the BAL fluid of 39% (11 of 28) of the corresponding patients. Eight of 19 adenocarcinomas contained a K-ras mutation, and the identical mutation was detected with a mutation ligation assay in the BAL fluid of 50% (four of eight) of the corresponding patients. The p16 gene was methylated in 19 of 50 tumors, and methylated p16 alleles were detected in the BAL fluid of 63% (12 of 19) of the corresponding patients. Microsatellite instability in at least one marker was detected with a panel of 15 markers frequently altered in NSCLC in 23 of 50 tumors; the identical alteration was detected in the BAL fluid of 14% (three of 22) of the corresponding patients. When all four techniques were used, mutations or microsatellite instability was detected in the paired BAL fluid of 23 (53%) of the 43 patients with tumors carrying a genetic alteration. CONCLUSION: Although still limited by sensitivity, molecular diagnostic strategies can detect the presence of neoplastic cells in the proximal airway of patients with surgically resectable NSCLC.  (+info)

(3/5496) Localization of a candidate surfactant convertase to type II cells, macrophages, and surfactant subfractions.

Pulmonary surfactant exists in the alveolus in several distinct subtypes that differ in their morphology, composition, and surface activity. Experiments by others have implicated a serine hydrolase in the production of the inactive small vesicular subtype of surfactant (N. J. Gross and R. M. Schultz. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1044: 222-230, 1990). Our laboratory recently identified this enzyme in the rat as the serine carboxylesterase ES-2 [F. Barr, H. Clark, and S. Hawgood. Am. J. Physiol. 274 (Lung Cell. Mol. Physiol. 18): L404-L410, 1998]. In the present study, we determined the cellular sites of expression of ES-2 in rat lung using a digoxygenin-labeled ES-2 riboprobe. ES-2 mRNA was localized to type II cells and alveolar macrophages but not to Clara cells. Using a specific ES-2 antibody, we determined the protein distribution of ES-2 in the lung by immunohistochemistry, and it was found to be consistent with the sites of mRNA expression. Most of the ES-2 in rat bronchoalveolar lavage is in the surfactant-depleted supernatant, but ES-2 was also consistently localized to the small vesicular surfactant subfraction presumed to form as a consequence of conversion activity. These results are consistent with a role for endogenous lung ES-2 in surfactant metabolism.  (+info)

(4/5496) Expression of heat shock protein 72 by alveolar macrophages in hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

The current study was done to look at a possible role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). The specific aims were to determine whether there was a difference in the expression of HSP72 in alveolar macrophages (AMs) between mice challenged with HP antigen and saline-treated control mice and between AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 18 patients with HP and 11 normal subjects. The expression of HSP72 was studied under basal conditions and under a mild heat shock. HSP72 expression by AMs in response to in vitro stimulation with Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula was lower in AMs of control mice than in those of HP animals. HSP72 was constitutively expressed in AMs of both normal and HP subjects. Densitometric ratios showed that AMs from normal subjects responded to heat shock with a 39 degrees C-to-37 degrees C ratio of 1.72 +/- 0.18 (mean +/- SE), and AMs from HP patients responded with a ratio of 1.16 +/- 0.16 (P = 0.0377). This decreased induction by additional stress of AMs could lead to an altered immunoregulatory activity and account for the inflammation seen in HP.  (+info)

(5/5496) A rapid polymerase chain reaction technique for detecting M tuberculosis in a variety of clinical specimens.

A rapid in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay is described for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in clinical material. Its performance is compared with two kit based systems. The results of the in-house assay were comparable with the commercial assays, detecting M tuberculosis in 100% of smear positive, culture positive samples. The in-house assay proved to be rapid, easy, and inexpensive to perform, and the inclusion of an internal inhibitor control permitted validation of the PCR results.  (+info)

(6/5496) Cigarette smoking decreases interleukin-8 secretion by human alveolar macrophages.

Cigarette smoking can impair pulmonary immune function, and hence influences the development of lung diseases. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a proinflammatory peptide and a potent chemotactic factor for neutrophils, and is produced by both immune and non-immune cells including monocytes and alveolar macrophages (AM). We investigated the effect of cigarette smoking on the secretion of IL-8 by human AM. The IL-8 concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was much higher in smokers than in non-smokers (18.4 +/- 3.9 vs 4.1 +/- 1.0 pg ml-1; P < 0.005). However, spontaneous IL-8 secretion by cultured AM was lower in smokers than in non-smokers (46.8 +/- 12.7 vs 124.1 +/- 24.0 ng ml-1; P < 0.01). When stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), AM from smokers secreted significantly less IL-8 than those from non-smokers at all tested concentrations of LPS. In contrast, the amount of IL-8 secreted by peripheral blood monocytes with or without LPS stimulation was comparable in smokers and non-smokers. These observations indicate that smoking decreases IL-8 secretion by AM, which may modify or decrease the inflammatory response in the lung.  (+info)

(7/5496) Effect of hyperoxia on human macrophage cytokine response.

In the development of lung damage induced by oxidative stress, it has been proposed that changes in alveolar macrophages (AM) function with modifications in cytokine production may contribute to altered repair processes. To characterize the changes in profiles of cytokine production by macrophages exposed to oxidants, the effects of hyperoxia (95% O2) on interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6, IL-8, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were studied. Experiments were first performed using AM obtained from control subjects and children with interstitial lung disease. Results showed that a 48 h O2 exposure was associated with two distinct patterns of response: a decrease in TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 expression, and an increase in IL-8. To complete these observations we used U937 cells that were exposed for various durations to hyperoxia. We confirmed that a 48 h O2 exposure led to similar changes with a decrease in TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 production and an increase in IL-8. Interestingly, this cytokine response was preceded during the first hours of O2 treatment by induction of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6. These data indicate that hyperoxia induces changes in the expression of macrophages inflammatory cytokines, and that these modifications appear to be influenced by the duration of O2 exposure.  (+info)

(8/5496) Pneumonia in febrile neutropenic patients and in bone marrow and blood stem-cell transplant recipients: use of high-resolution computed tomography.

PURPOSE: To obtain statistical data on the use of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) for early detection of pneumonia in febrile neutropenic patients with unknown focus of infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred eighty-eight HRCT studies were performed prospectively in 112 neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin persisting for more than 48 hours despite empiric antibiotic treatment. Fifty-four of these studies were performed in transplant recipients. All patients had normal chest roentgenograms. If pneumonia was detected by HRCT, guided bronchoalveolar lavage was recommended. Evidence of pneumonia on chest roentgenograms during follow-up and micro-organisms detected during follow-up were regarded as documentation of pneumonia. RESULTS: Of the 188 HRCT studies, 112 (60%) showed pneumonia and 76 were normal. Documentation of pneumonia was possible in 61 cases by chest roentgenography or micro-organism detection (54%) (P < 10(-6)). Sensitivity of HRCT was 87% (88% in transplant recipients), specificity was 57% (67%), and the negative predictive value was 88% (97%). A time gain of 5 days was achieved by the additional use of HRCT compared to an exclusive use of chest roentgenography. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of inflammatory pulmonary disease after a suspicious HRCT scan (> 50%) proves that pneumonia is not excluded by a normal chest roentgenogram. Given the significantly longer duration of febrile episodes in transplant recipients, HRCT findings are particularly relevant in this subgroup. Patients with normal HRCT scans, particularly transplant recipients, have a low risk of pneumonia during follow-up. All neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin and normal chest roentgenograms should undergo HRCT.  (+info)