Double lumbosacral lipomas of the dorsal and filar types associated with OEIS complex: case report. (17/48)

A female baby was born at 37 weeks and 6 days gestation by vaginal delivery with omphalocele, exstrophy of the cloaca, and imperforate anus, indicating the presence of OEIS complex, a rare combination of defects consisting of omphalocele (O), exstrophy of the cloaca (E), imperforate anus (I), and spinal deformity (S), associated with lumbosacral lipoma. The most common associated spinal deformity is terminal myelocystocele, and spinal lipoma is rare. Constructive interference in steady-state magnetic resonance imaging clearly revealed double lipomas, a dorsal-type lipoma, located dorsal to the low-lying conus medullaris, and a filar-type lipoma, revealed by a thickened and fatty filum terminale. After recovery from abdominogenital repairs, debulking of the dorsal-type lipoma and untethering of the spinal cord by sectioning of the filar-type lipoma were performed at the age of 14 months. Neurosurgical treatment for occult spinal dysraphism should be undertaken after recovery from the initial series of major abdominogenital procedures.  (+info)

The exstrophy-epispadias complex. (18/48)

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Management of obstructive renal failure caused by bilateral renal aspergilloma in an immunocompetent newborn. (19/48)

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Fibroblast growth factor-10 signals development of von Brunn's nests in the exstrophic bladder. (20/48)

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Parent perspectives of health related quality of life for adolescents with bladder exstrophy-epispadias as measured by the child health questionnaire-parent form 50. (21/48)

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Measurement of the fetal umbilical cord insertion-to-genital tubercle length in early gestation: in utero sonographic study. (22/48)

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to establish in utero reference ranges for the fetal umbilical cord insertion-to-genital tubercle length in early gestation. METHODS: A prospective cross-sectional study was performed on 140 normal low-risk singleton pregnancies between 12 and 18 weeks' gestation. The umbilical cord insertion-to-genital tubercle length was measured in a midsagittal section with high-resolution transvaginal or transabdominal sonography. The mean and 95% prediction limits were defined for each gestational week and analyzed by regression equations and correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Adequate measurements were obtained in 134 patients. The umbilical cord insertion-to-genital tubercle length as a function of gestational age was expressed by the following regression equation: umbilical cord insertion-to-genital tubercle length = -3.079452 + 1.09 x week (R(2) = 0.7117). The correlation R(2) = 0.7117 was found to be highly statistically significant (P < .001). The normal mean and 95% prediction limits were defined for each gestational week. During the study period, 2 cases were referred to our unit because of nonvisualization of the urinary bladder. The umbilical cord insertion-to-genital tubercle lengths in these cases were below the 95th percentile, confirming the diagnosis of bladder exstrophy. CONCLUSIONS: The normative data established in this study may be helpful for early pre-natal diagnosis congenital bladder exstrophy.  (+info)

Surgical treatment of uterine prolapse in women with bladder exstrophy: report of two cases with modified Prolift procedure. (23/48)

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Phenotype severity in the bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex: analysis of genetic and nongenetic contributing factors in 441 families from North America and Europe. (24/48)

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