Can anything be done to maintain the effectiveness of pyrethroid-impregnated bednets against malaria vectors? (1/490)

Pyrethroid-treated bednets are the most promising available method of controlling malaria in the tropical world. Every effort should be made to find methods of responding to, or preventing, the emergence of pyrethroid resistance in the Anopheles vectors. Some cases of such resistance are known, notably in An. gambiae in West Africa where the kdr type of resistance has been selected, probably because of the use of pyrethroids on cotton. Because pyrethroids are irritant to mosquitoes, laboratory studies on the impact of, and selection for, resistance need to be conducted with free-flying mosquitoes in conditions that are as realistic as possible. Such studies are beginning to suggest that, although there is cross-resistance to all pyrethroids, some treatments are less likely to select for resistance than others are. Organophosphate, carbamate and phenyl pyrazole insecticides have been tested as alternative treatments for nets or curtains. Attempts have been made to mix an insect growth regulator and a pyrethroid on netting to sterilize pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes that are not killed after contact with the netting. There seems to be no easy solution to the problem of pyrethroid resistance management, but further research is urgently needed.  (+info)

Effects of truss mattress upon sleep and bed climate. (2/490)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a truss mattress upon sleep and bed climate. The truss mattress which has been designed to decrease the pressure and bed climate humidity was tested. Six healthy female volunteers with a mean age of 23.3 years, served as subjects. The experiment was carried out under two conditions: a truss mattress (T) and a futon (F) (Japanese bedding). The ambient temperature and relative humidity were controlled at 19-20 degrees C, and RH 50-60% respectively. Sleep was monitored by an EEG machine and the rectal temperature, skin temperature and bed climate were also measured continuously. Subjective evaluations of bed and sleep were obtained before and after the recording sessions. No significant difference was observed in the sleep parameters and time spent in each sleep stage. Rectal temperature was significantly lower in T than F. Although there was no significant difference in bed climate over the T/F, the temperature under T/F was significantly higher in T. No significant difference was observed in subjective sleep evaluation. The subjective feeling of the mattress was significantly warmer in F than T before sleep. These results suggest that although T does not disturb the sleep parameters and the bed climate is maintained at the same level as with F, it may affect rectal temperature which can be due to low thermal insulation.  (+info)

Cigarette smoking and other risk factors in relation to p53 expression in breast cancer among young women. (3/490)

p53 mutations may be a fingerprint for cigarette smoking and other environmental carcinogens, including breast carcinogens. This study was undertaken to explore whether p53 mutations are associated with environmental or other suspected or established risk factors for breast cancer. p53 protein detection by immunohistochemistry (which is more easily quantified in large epidemiological studies than are mutations, and are highly correlated with them) was determined for 378 patients from a case-control study of breast cancer. In this population-based sample of women under the age of 45 years, 44.4% (168/378) of the cases had p53 protein detected by immunohistochemistry (p53+). Polytomous logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for p53+ and p53- breast cancer, as compared with the controls, in relation to cigarette smoking and other factors. The ratio of the ORs was used as an indicator of heterogeneity in risk for p53+ versus p53- cancer. The ratio of the ORs in a multivariate model was substantially elevated among women with a greater than high school education [2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.43-4.00], current cigarette smokers (1.96; 95% CI, 1.10-3.52), and users of electric blankets, water beds, or mattresses (1.78; 95% CI, 1.11-2.86). Nonsignificant heterogeneity was noted for family history of breast cancer and ethnicity but not for other known or suspected risk factors. Coupled with the strong biological plausibility of the association, our data support the hypothesis that in breast cancer, as with other tumors, p53 protein immunohistochemical detection may be associated with exposure to environmental carcinogens such as cigarette smoking.  (+info)

Monitoring community response to malaria control using insecticide-impregnated bed nets, curtains and residual spray at Nsukka, Nigeria. (4/490)

A project testing the efficacy of insecticide (permethrin)-impregnated bed nets, compared with impregnated door and window curtains, residual house spraying, and a control group was implemented in 12 village clusters in the Nsukka Local Government Area of Enugu State, Nigeria, using epidemiologic and entomologic indicators. The appropriate materials and services were given free to all families. During the first year of study, three monitoring exercises were carried out in a random selection of homes where children under 5 years of age resided. Information was collected on perceived effectiveness of the interventions, condition of nets and curtains, reasons for not sleeping under nets, and recall of steps required in caring for nets and curtains. Bed nets were perceived as more effective in reducing mosquito bites compared with the two other interventions. At the last monitoring period, which occurred a few weeks before a re-impregnation exercise, respondents also perceived bed nets to be most effective in preventing malaria. These findings coincided with epidemiologic evidence. Curtains, especially those at doors, were more likely to be torn and dirty than bed nets. Although holes would not reduce the effectiveness of the insecticide, they could reduce the 'beauty' of the curtains, a perceived benefit that initially attracted villagers to both curtains and nets. Bed net owners reported significantly less frequent use of other mosquito control measures in their homes than did members of the other groups. Finally, bed net users demonstrated increased knowledge of use and care steps than did those with curtains. These findings suggested a high level of social acceptability of bed nets, and point to the need to test their acceptability further under conditions where people would pay for nets and communities would manage distribution and re-impregnation systems.  (+info)

The impact of charging for insecticide on the Gambian National Impregnated Bednet Programme. (5/490)

During the second year of the Gambian National Impregnated Bednet Programme (NIBP) charges for insecticide ($0.50 per net) were introduced into the half of the primary health care villages in the country where insecticide have been provided free of charge the previous year. Free insecticide was provided in the remaining villages that had acted as controls during the previous year. In villages where insecticide was provided free, 77% of nets were treated with insecticide. In contrast, in villages where charges were made coverage was only 14%. During the first year of the NIBP, mortality in children was significantly lower in villages where insecticide was provided free than in the control villages. Introduction of a charge for insecticide into the first group of villages and the provision of free insecticide in the latter abolished this difference. The cash income of rural Gambians is very limited and payment of even $2-3 for insecticide treatment for all the bednets in a household represents a substantial outlay. Further education on the benefits of treatment of nets and/or the provision of cheaper insecticide will be required before the full benefits of this powerful new malaria control measure can be fully realised in the Gambia.  (+info)

Control of malaria vectors: cost analysis in a province of northern Vietnam. (6/490)

The cost of permethrin-treated bednets (50% EC; 0.2 g/m2, 2 rounds per year) was compared to the cost of residual spraying with lambdacyhalothrin 10% WP (0.03 g/m2, once yearly) in Hoa Binh, a mountainous province in northern Vietnam. Calculations of the amounts of insecticides needed were based on national guidelines, on data from a cross-sectional survey and on district activity reports. The actual cost of insecticide required per person per year was lower for impregnation (US$ 0.26) than for spraying (US$ 0.36), but the difference was smaller than expected. The total cost for impregnated bednets per person per year amounted to US$ 0.90 compared to USS 0.47 for spraying. The determining factor was the cost of the net, amounting to US$ 0.58 per person per year, assuming a 5-year life of the net. Other material (excluding nets), labour and transport combined, accounted for only 17% of the impregnation cost and 23% of spraying expenses. However, for the National Malaria Control Programme of Vietnam, the cost per person per year for impregnated bednets amounted to US$ 0.32 only, because the vast majority of nets are bought by the population. For spraying, the programme had to bear the entire cost.  (+info)

A new strategy for treating nets. Part 1: formulation and dosage. (7/490)

The conventional dosages of pyrethroid insecticides on mosquito nets assume that nets will be retreated at 6-12 month intervals. However, dosage should be related to washing of nets; if nets are only washed once or twice a year, their dosage requirements will be different to those which are washed fortnightly. A 'low-dose, frequent-wash' retreatment system might be technically more appropriate and more affordable where nets are washed frequently, as they are in Dar es Salaam. Moreover, for use as a domestic insecticide, water-based formulations of pyrethroid are preferable to the more commonly used emulsifiable concentrates (ECs). This paper reports laboratory evaluations of three formulations (ECs, Flowable, CS) of three pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, permethrin). Insecticidal activity was tested using serial bioassays at a range of dosages using Anopheles gambiae. The water-based formulations were no less effective than the ECs, even at the lowest dosages. Nets treated with 3 mg/m2 and then repeatedly washed and retreated after each wash with either 3 mg/m2 or 1 mg/m2 were subjected to gas chromatography analysis. This showed that the amounts of pyrethroid in the nets accumulated rapidly over the first few wash-retreatment cycles and then remained fairly stable over subsequent cycles. These nets gave consistently high bioassay mortalities throughout the experiment, while the mortality declined rapidly after several washes with the nets that were treated at 3 mg/m2 but not retreated. Experimental huts were used to compare the effectiveness of these 2 net retreatment regimes and nets which were not retreated. All nets caused high mortality rates amongst Anopheles females, but had negligible effects on culicines; either in killing them or in preventing feeding. Therefore use of a high 'loading' dose for initial treatment with lower 'maintenance' doses for retreatment may be preferable to ensure that net users promptly perceive the benefits of the insecticide against culicines.  (+info)

A new strategy for treating nets. Part 2: users' perceptions of efficacy and washing practices and their implications for insecticide dosage. (8/490)

The conventional way to treat a mosquito net with pyrethroid insecticide is to apply a standard dosage every 6-12 months, and to avoid washing the net until just before retreatment. In some places, nets are normally washed much more often than this, and it may then be more appropriate to apply smaller amounts of insecticide after each wash. The choice of strategy must take into account not only biological effectiveness, but also users' perceptions of this effectiveness and their net-washing habits. We used focus groups to compare users' responses to nets treated with different dosages and chemicals. One hundred current net users in urban Dares-Salaam were each given a net that had been pretreated either with permethrin (200 or 500 mg/m2), or with lambdacyhalothrin (3 or 15 mg/m2), or with water. Neither participants nor investigators knew which group had received which treatment. Focus group discussions were held after 2, 8 and 12 weeks. Participants greatly preferred treated nets. Low doses were perceived to be less effective, especially after 8 and 12 weeks. After 12 weeks most participants had washed their nets, despite requests to the contrary Dirty nets were regarded as unhealthy and socially unacceptable. Few participants experienced side-effects or expressed fears about the safety of treatment. We conclude that asking people to refrain from washing their nets is unrealistic. A 'low-dose frequent-treatment' strategy of insecticide application may be more appropriate in the long run. At first, however, low doses give perceptibly inferior protection. An initial high (loading) dose, followed by frequent lower (maintenance) dosages, might solve this problem.  (+info)