Visual art in hospitals: case studies and review of the evidence. (9/22)

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A pilot study assessing art therapy as a mental health intervention for subfertile women. (10/22)

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The Memory Art Project: medical students and older adults. (11/22)

BACKGROUND: The humanities are increasingly recognized as an important component of medical student education. This study addresses whether early exposure to healthy older adults through the humanities may prepare medical students for positive relationships with aging patients. Few studies have presented a detailed example of a humanistic endeavor organized by medical students to facilitate student interactions with healthy older adults. OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a unique art project organized to promote rapport between medical students and healthy older adults. METHODS: Twelve first- and second-year students at the Medical College of Wisconsin were paired with 12 older adult residents at a local independent living facility. Participation was voluntary, and all participants were asked to complete 3 sessions over the course of 2 months. During the first session, partners met each other and formed a relationship. A professional art instructor provided a lesson and supervised practice in acrylic painting. In the second session, all student and older adult participants created a painting to represent their partner. The third session featured a reception to celebrate the artwork and new friendships. RESULTS: Ten medical student/older adult pairs completed the project. Reactions were positive, and the project was perceived as beneficial to both students and older adults. CONCLUSION: The Memory Art Project effectively promoted positive communication between medical students and an aging population that will need to interact meaningfully with medical professionals in the future.  (+info)

Art therapy may be benefitial for reducing stress--related behaviours in people with dementia--case report. (12/22)

Communication with person with dementia (PWD) is becoming worse and worse during the course of illness, and at the end may be totally lost. Non-pharmacological interventions may be beneficial in increasing the behavioural disturbances which appears frequently during the progression of dementia, and combination of non-pharmacological techniques and drugs is usually more efficacy than psychopharmacs alone. Mr. Zvonko, the PWD diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease of moderate stage, is presented in this case report. Although Mr. Zvonko was treated with antidementia drugs, the behavioural disturbances were present. The introduction of low doses of conventional antipsychotic was accompanied with extrapiramidal side-effects, and atypical antipsychotics were not used due to the FDA warning and non-willingness of caregiver and family to take that risk. After his individual and family status was evaluated, he was advised to attend the daily care centre and to start with art therapy. Despite he was never drawing pictures before developing AD, everybody, including his wife who is also a caregiver, was surprised with his talent and creativity. While drawing the pictures he was calm and satisfied and his behaviour in the daily care centre, but also at home, became much more adequate. There was no need to add psychopharmacs for behavioural disturbances. In this case the art therapy was shown to be an excellent add-on non-pharmacological intervention, beneficial for reducing stress-related behaviours in PWD taking antidementia drugs.  (+info)

'A man paints with his brains and not with his hands' (Michelangelo). (13/22)

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Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial (MATISSE). (14/22)

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Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: multicentre pragmatic randomised trial. (15/22)

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Primary-care based participatory rehabilitation: users' views of a horticultural and arts project. (16/22)

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