Predictors of adherence to occlusion therapy 3 months after cataract extraction in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study. (33/91)

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Fixation control and eye alignment in children treated for dense congenital or developmental cataracts. (34/91)

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The infant aphakia treatment study contact lens experience: one-year outcomes. (35/91)

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Cost of intraocular lens versus contact lens treatment after unilateral congenital cataract surgery: retrospective analysis at age 1 year. (36/91)

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Intraocular lens iris fixation. Clinical and macular OCT outcomes. (37/91)

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Axial elongation following cataract surgery during the first year of life in the infant Aphakia Treatment Study. (38/91)

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Epikeratophakia for aphakia, keratoconus, and myopia. (39/91)

A series of 67 cases of epikeratophakia is presented with an average time from surgery of 12.2 months. For aphakia there was a delay in the recovery of vision, but by nine months 83% of 57 patients achieved an acuity equal to, or within 1 line of, the preoperative value. 57% were corrected to within 3 dioptres of emmetropia, but in the latter part of the series 75% were within this range. Astigmatism and reduced contrast sensitivity, especially in the presence of glare, were important complications. For keratoconus, 86% of seven patients with over two months of follow-up achieved a spectacle corrected acuity of 6/9 or better. One patient had surgery for myopia and obtained the desired refractive correction.  (+info)

Contact lenses for infant aphakia. (40/91)

We prospectively studied for three years the optical correction by contact lenses of 83 aphakic infants (141 eyes) who generally also had systemic and other ocular anomalies: 85% of the patients tolerated the lens wear for the whole study period. Complications occurred in 46 eyes and led to cessation of lens wear in two cases. Ten patients abandoned the lenses for other reasons. Thirty-four eyes needed subsequent intraocular surgery, mostly minor, and nine patients had strabismus surgery. Contact lenses are a versatile, safe, successful, and cost effective treatment for aphakia in infancy against which, before their widespread introduction for primary optical correction of infant aphakia, other methods of aphakic treatment need to be compared.  (+info)