Repair of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm is worthwhile in selected cases. (1/1156)

INTRODUCTION: The risks and benefits of operating on patients with ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) have not been defined. The aim of the present study is to report this unit's experience with operations performed for ruptured TAAA over a 10-year period. METHODS: Interrogation of a prospectively gathered computerised database. PATIENTS: Between 1 January 1983 and 30 June 1996, 188 consecutive patients with TAAA were operated on, of whom 23 (12%) were operated for rupture. RESULTS: There were nine survivors (40%). Patients whose preoperative systolic blood pressure remained above 100 mmHg were significantly more likely to survive (4/8 vs. 13/15, p = 0.03 by Fisher's exact test). Survival was also related to Crawford type: type I (two of three survived); II (none of six); III (two of six); and IV (five of eight). All non-type II, non-shocked patients survived operation. Survivors spent a median of 28 (range 10-66) postoperative days in hospital, of which a median of 6 (range 2-24) days were spent in the intensive care unit. Survivor morbidity comprised prolonged ventilation (> 5 days) (n = 3); tracheostomy (n = 1); and temporary haemofiltration (n = 2). No survivor developed paraplegia or required permanent dialysis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients in shock with a Crawford type II aneurysm have such a poor prognosis that intervention has to be questioned except in the most favourable of circumstances. However, patients with types I, III and IV who are not shocked on presentation can be salvaged and, where possible, should be transferred to a unit where appropriate expertise and facilities are available.  (+info)

Rupture of aortic aneurysm with right-sided haemothorax. (2/1156)

A 62-yr-old male with a history of high blood pressure was admitted for persistent dyspnoea and a right-sided pleural effusion, complicated by a recent episode of shock. There was no history of trauma and the patient denied any thoracic pain. A chest tube was inserted which released nonclotting bloody fluid. A thoracic computed tomographic scan of the chest revealed an aneurysm of the inferior third of the descending thoracic aorta. The patient underwent a successful prosthetic graft replacement. We emphasize that rupture of aortic aneurysms should be considered in the evaluation of spontaneous haemothorax even if it is right-sided and not associated with pain.  (+info)

The value of late computed tomographic scanning in identification of vascular abnormalities after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. (3/1156)

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of late arterial abnormalities after aortic aneurysm repair and thus to suggest a routine for postoperative radiologic follow-up examination and to establish reference criteria for endovascular repair. METHODS: Computed tomographic (CT) scan follow-up examination was obtained at 8 to 9 years after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair on a cohort of patients enrolled in the Canadian Aneurysm Study. The original registry consisted of 680 patients who underwent repair of nonruptured AAA. When the request for CT scan follow-up examination was sent in 1994, 251 patients were alive and potentially available for CT scan follow-up examination and 94 patients agreed to undergo abdominal and thoracic CT scanning procedures. Each scan was interpreted independently by two vascular radiologists. RESULTS: For analysis, the aorta was divided into five defined segments and an aneurysm was defined as a more than 50% enlargement from the expected normal value as defined in the reporting standards for aneurysms. With this strict definition, 64.9% of patients had aneurysmal dilatation and the abnormality was considered as a possible indication for surgical repair in 13.8%. Of the 39 patients who underwent initial repair with a tube graft, 12 (30.8%) were found to have an iliac aneurysm and six of these aneurysms (15.4%) were of possible surgical significance. Graft dilatation was observed from the time of operation (median graft size of 18 mm) to a median size of 22 mm as measured by means of CT scanning at follow-up examination. Fluid or thrombus was seen around the graft in 28% of the cases, and bowel was believed to be intimately associated with the graft in 7%. CONCLUSION: Late follow-up CT scans after AAA repair often show vascular abnormalities. Most of these abnormalities are not clinically significant, but, in 13.8% of patients, the thoracic or abdominal aortic segment was aneurysmal and, in 15.4% of patients who underwent tube graft placement, one of the iliac arteries was significantly abnormal to warrant consideration for surgical repair. On the basis of these findings, a routine CT follow-up examination after 5 years is recommended. This study provides a population-based study for comparison with the results of endovascular repair.  (+info)

Endovascular repair of a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm: a tip for systemic pressure reduction. (4/1156)

A proposed technique for systemic pressure reduction during deployment of a stent graft was studied. A 67-year-old man, who had a descending thoracic aneurysm, was successfully treated with an endovascular procedure. An occluding balloon was introduced into the inferior vena cava (IVC) through the femoral vein. The balloon volume was manipulated with carbon dioxide gas to reduce the venous return, resulting in a transient and well-controlled hypotension. This IVC-occluding technique for systemic pressure reduction may be safe and convenient to minimize distal migration of stent grafts.  (+info)

Endovascular stent graft repair of aortopulmonary fistula. (5/1156)

Two patients who had aortopulmonary fistula of postoperative origin with hemoptysis underwent successful repair by means of an endovascular stent graft procedure. One patient had undergone repeated thoracotomies two times, and the other one time to repair anastomotic aneurysms of the descending aorta after surgery for Takayasu's arteritis. A self-expanding stainless steel stent covered with a Dacron graft was inserted into the lesion through the external iliac or femoral artery. The patients recovered well, with no signs of infection or recurrent hemoptysis 8 months after the procedure. Endovascular stent grafting may be a therapeutic option for treating patients with aortopulmonary fistula.  (+info)

Intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography as an adjuvant to fluoroscopy during endovascular thoracic aortic repair. (6/1156)

OBJECTIVES: To define the utility of intraoperative transeophageal echocardiography (TEE) during endovascular thoracic aortic repair. DESIGN: Retrospective study. MATERIALS: Five patients underwent six transluminal endovascular stent-graft procedures for repair of thoracic aortic disease. METHODS: After induction of anaesthesia, a multiplane or biplane TEE probe was placed to obtain views of the diseased aorta. Both transverse and longitudinal planes of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic segments were imaged. The aortic pathology was confirmed by TEE and the proximal and distal extents of the intrathoracic lesion were defined. Doppler and colour-flow imaging was used to identify flow patterns through the aorta before and after stent-graft deployment. RESULTS: Visualisation and confirmation of the aortic pathology by ultrasonography was accomplished in all patients. TEE was able to confirm proper placement of the endograft relative to the aortic lesion after deployment and was able to confirm exclusion of blood flow into the aneurysm sacs. CONCLUSIONS: TEE may facilitate repair by confirming aortic pathology, identifying endograft placement, assessment of the adequacy of aneurysm sack isolation, as well as dynamic intraoperative cardiac assessment.  (+info)

The role of radial elastic properties in the development of aortic dissections. (7/1156)

PURPOSE: The response of the upper and lower thoracic aorta to radial tensile stresses was compared with the response to circumferential and longitudinal stresses to understand the role of tensile stress in the tearing phase of an aortic dissection. METHODS: Square tissue samples (1.6 by 1.6 cm) were cut from the upper and lower segments of six porcine thoracic aortas and were elongated in the radial direction with a tensile testing machine. The radial extensibility of the thoracic aorta was compared with adjacent tissue samples that were tested in tension in the circumferential and longitudinal directions based on Young's modulus (ie, the ratio of tensile stress to strain). RESULTS: The elastic properties of the thoracic aorta in the radial direction were markedly different from both the circumferential and longitudinal properties. The average Young's modulus (calculated immediately before failing) was significantly lower in the radial direction for both the upper and lower thoracic segments (61.4 +/- 4.3 kPa, SEM) than the Young's modulus of corresponding segments in the circumferential and longitudinal directions that were not tested to failure (151.1 +/- 8.6 kPa and 112.7 +/- 9.2 kPa, respectively; P <. 05). Sections 7 micrometer thick were collected from four samples obtained from one upper thoracic aorta that were strained at 0, 1.0, 2.5, and 4.0 and then stained either with Movat's pentachrome or with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological analysis of the samples stressed in the radial direction revealed that smooth muscle cells were torn loose from their attachments to each other and to adjacent elastin. CONCLUSION: Although the aorta normally functions under radial compressive stresses associated with lumen blood pressure, these results show that the aorta tears radially at a much lower value of stress than would have been predicted from previous studies that have reported longitudinal and circumferential Young's modulus. This could explain why dissections propagate readily once the initial tear occurs.  (+info)

Chronic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta presenting with right pleural effusion and left phrenic paralysis. (8/1156)

A 62-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with chronic dysphagia and lower back pain. Chest radiography revealed a wide mediastinal shadow and an elevated left diaphragm, which proved to be secondary to left phrenic paralysis. The patient was diagnosed with an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta and was admitted to the hospital. After the patient was admitted, the aneurysm ruptured into the right chest. The patient underwent an emergency operation to replace the ruptured segment with a synthetic graft. Postoperative recovery and follow-up were uneventful. This report describes an unusual presentation of a thoracic aortic aneurysm. Hemidiaphragmatic paralysis caused by compression of the phrenic nerve is an unusual complication that, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported.  (+info)