Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) infection in red foxes fed infected bird carcasses. (25/90)

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Heterologous replacement of the supposed host determining region of avihepadnaviruses: high in vivo infectivity despite low infectivity for hepatocytes. (26/90)

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Phylogenetic analysis of the non-structural (NS) gene of influenza A viruses isolated from mallards in Northern Europe in 2005. (27/90)

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Costs of reproduction in a long-lived bird: large clutch size is associated with low survival in the presence of a highly virulent disease. (28/90)

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Migration of whooper swans and outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus in eastern Asia. (29/90)

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Developmental basis for telencephalon expansion in waterfowl: enlargement prior to neurogenesis. (30/90)

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Pathology of whooper swans (Cygnus cygnus) infected with H5N1 avian influenza virus in Akita, Japan, in 2008. (31/90)

Two (1 adult and 1 young bird) of 4 H5N1-highly-pathogenic-avian-influenza (HPAI)-virus-infected whooper swans in Akita, Japan, in 2008 were investigated pathologically. Macroscopically, white spots with hemorrhages were scattered in the pancreas in the adult bird. Histologically, the adult bird had severe necrotizing pancreatitis and mild nonpurulent encephalitis. The young bird had severe nonpurulent encephalitis and nonpurulent enteric ganglionitis, and intestinal venous wall thickening. Virus antigens were detected in the lesions of pancreatitis in the adult bird and of encephalitis in adult and young birds. These findings suggest that the swans died or became moribund due to neurological disorders and necrotizing pancreatitis caused by H5N1 HPAI virus infection.  (+info)

Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from waterfowl in the upper midwest region of the United States. (32/90)

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