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(1/1718) Colon and rectal anastomoses do not require routine drainage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

OBJECTIVE: Many surgeons continue to place a prophylactic drain in the pelvis after completion of a colorectal anastomosis, despite considerable evidence that this practice may not be useful. The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to determine if placement of a drain after a colonic or rectal anastomosis can reduce the rate of complications. METHODS: A search of the Medline database of English-language articles published from 1987 to 1997 was conducted using the terms "colon," "rectum," "postoperative complications," "surgical anastomosis," and "drainage." A manual search was also conducted. Four randomized controlled trials, including a total of 414 patients, were identified that compared the routine use of drainage of colonic and/or rectal anastomoses to no drainage. Two reviewers assessed the trials independently. Trial quality was critically appraised using a previously published scale, and data on mortality, clinical and radiologic anastomotic leakage rate, wound infection rate, and major complication rate were extracted. RESULTS: The overall quality of the studies was poor. Use of a drain did not significantly affect the rate of any of the outcomes examined, although the power of this analysis to exclude any difference was low. Comparison of pooled results revealed an odds ratio for clinical leak of 1.5 favoring the control (no drain) group. Of the 20 observed leaks among all four studies that occurred in a patient with a drain in place, in only one case (5%) did pus or enteric content actually appear in the effluent of the existing drain. CONCLUSIONS: Any significant benefit of routine drainage of colon and rectal anastomoses in reducing the rate of anastomotic leakage or other surgical complications can be excluded with more confidence based on pooled data than by the individual trials alone. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials would further reinforce this conclusion.  (+info)

(2/1718) Is early post-operative treatment with 5-fluorouracil possible without affecting anastomotic strength in the intestine?

Early post-operative local or systemic administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is under investigation as a means to improve outcome after resection of intestinal malignancies. It is therefore quite important to delineate accurately its potentially negative effects on anastomotic repair. Five groups (n = 24) of rats underwent resection and anastomosis of both ileum and colon: a control group and four experimental groups receiving daily 5-FU, starting immediately after operation or after 1, 2 or 3 days. Within each group, the drug (or saline) was delivered either intraperitoneally (n = 12) or intravenously (n = 12). Animals were killed 7 days after operation and healing was assessed by measurement of anastomotic bursting pressure, breaking strength and hydroxyproline content. In all cases, 5-FU treatment from the day of operation or from day 1 significantly (P<0.025) and severely suppressed wound strength; concomitantly, the anastomotic hydroxyproline content was reduced. Depending on the location of the anastomosis and the route of 5-FU administration, even a period of 3 days between operation and first dosage seemed insufficient to prevent weakening of the anastomosis. The effects of intravenous administration, though qualitatively similar, were quantitatively less dramatic than those observed after intraperitoneal delivery. Post-operative treatment with 5-FU, if started within the first 3 days after operation, is detrimental to anastomotic strength and may compromise anastomotic integrity.  (+info)

(3/1718) Right atrial bypass grafting for central venous obstruction associated with dialysis access: another treatment option.

PURPOSE: Central venous obstruction is a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo maintenance hemodialysis. We studied the use of right atrial bypass grafting in nine cases of central venous obstruction associated with upper extremity venous hypertension. To better understand the options for managing this condition, we discuss the roles of surgery and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement. METHODS: All patients had previously undergone placement of bilateral temporary subclavian vein dialysis catheters. Severe arm swelling, graft thrombosis, or graft malfunction developed because of central venous stenosis or obstruction in the absence of alternative access sites. A large-diameter (10 to 16 mm) externally reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex) graft was used to bypass the obstructed vein and was anastomosed to the right atrial appendage. This technique was used to bypass six lesions in the subclavian vein, two lesions at the innominate vein/superior vena caval junction, and one lesion in the distal axillary vein. RESULTS: All patients except one had significant resolution of symptoms without operative mortality. Bypass grafts remained patent, allowing the arteriovenous grafts to provide functional access for 1.5 to 52 months (mean, 15.4 months) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Because no mortality directly resulted from the procedure and the morbidity rate was acceptable, this bypass grafting technique was adequate in maintaining the dialysis access needed by these patients. Because of the magnitude of the procedure, we recommend it only for the occasional patient in whom all other access sites are exhausted and in whom percutaneous dilation and/or stenting has failed.  (+info)

(4/1718) Endovascular stent graft repair of aortopulmonary fistula.

Two patients who had aortopulmonary fistula of postoperative origin with hemoptysis underwent successful repair by means of an endovascular stent graft procedure. One patient had undergone repeated thoracotomies two times, and the other one time to repair anastomotic aneurysms of the descending aorta after surgery for Takayasu's arteritis. A self-expanding stainless steel stent covered with a Dacron graft was inserted into the lesion through the external iliac or femoral artery. The patients recovered well, with no signs of infection or recurrent hemoptysis 8 months after the procedure. Endovascular stent grafting may be a therapeutic option for treating patients with aortopulmonary fistula.  (+info)

(5/1718) Factors influencing the development of vein-graft stenosis and their significance for clinical management.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of clinical and graft factors on the development of stenotic lesions. In addition the implications of any significant correlation for duplex surveillance schedules or surgical bypass techniques was examined. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a prospective three centre study, preoperative and peroperative data on 300 infrainguinal autologous vein grafts was analysed. All grafts were monitored by a strict duplex surveillance program and all received an angiogram in the first postoperative year. A revision was only performed if there was evidence of a stenosis of 70% diameter reduction or greater on the angiogram. RESULTS: The minimum graft diameter was the only factor correlated significantly with the development of a significant graft stenosis (PSV-ratio > or = 2.5) during follow-up (p = 0.002). Factors that correlated with the development of event-causing graft stenosis, associated with revision or occlusion, were minimal graft diameter (p = 0.001), the use of a venovenous anastomosis (p = 0.005) and length of the graft (p = 0.025). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the minimal graft diameter was the only independent factor that significantly correlated with an event-causing graft stenosis (p = 0.009). The stenosis-free rates for grafts with a minimal diameter < 3.5 mm, between 3.5-4.5 and > or = 4.5 mm were 40%, 58% and 75%, respectively (p = < 0.05). Composite vein and arm-vein grafts with minimal diameters > or = 3.5 mm were compared with grafts which consisted of a single uninterrupted greater saphenous vein with a minimal diameter of < 3.5 mm. One-year secondary patency rates in these categories were of 94% and 76%, respectively (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: A minimal graft diameter < 3.5 mm was the only factor that significantly correlated with the development of a graft-stenosis. However, veins with larger diameters may still develop stenotic lesions. Composite vein and arm-vein grafts should be used rather than uninterrupted small caliber saphenous veins.  (+info)

(6/1718) Cylindrical or T-shaped silicone rubber stents for microanastomosis--technical note.

The ostium of the recipient artery and the orifice of the donor artery must be clearly visualized for the establishment of microvascular anastomosis. Specially designed colored flexible cylindrical or T-shaped silicone rubber stents were made in various sizes (400 or 500 microns diameter and 5 mm length) and applied to bypass surgery in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease such as moyamoya disease and internal carotid artery occlusion. The colored flexible stents facilitated confirmation of the ostium of the artery even in patients with moyamoya disease and allowed precise microvascular anastomosis without problems caused by the stent.  (+info)

(7/1718) Subclavian artery resection and reconstruction for thoracic inlet cancers.

PURPOSE: We previously described an original transcervical approach to resect primary or secondary malignant diseases that invade the thoracic inlet (TI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and long-term results of the resection and revascularization of the subclavian artery (SA). METHODS: Between 1986 and 1998, 34 patients (mean age, 49 years) underwent en bloc resection of TI cancer that had invaded the SA. The surgical approach was an L-shaped transclavicular cervicotomy in 33 patients. In 14 of these patients, this approach was associated with a posterolateral thoracotomy (n = 10) or a posterior midline approach (n = 4). In one patient, the procedure was achieved with a single posterolateral thoracotomy approach. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed in 16 patients. In one patient, a subclavian-left common carotid artery transposition was performed. In one other patient, an end-to-end anastomosis was performed between the proximal innominate artery and the SA. The right carotid artery was transposed into the SA in an end-to-side fashion. In 16 patients, prosthetic revascularization with a polytetrafluoroethylene graft was performed. Thirty-three patients underwent postoperative radiation therapy. RESULTS: There were no cases of perioperative death, neurologic sequelae, graft infections or occlusions, or limb ischemia. There were two delayed asymptomatic polytetrafluoroethylene graft occlusions at 12 and 31 months. The 5-year patency rate was 85%. During this study, 20 patients died: 18 died of tumor recurrence (5 local and systemic and 13 systemic), one of respiratory failure, and one of an unknown cause at 74 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 36%, and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 18%. CONCLUSION: Tumor arterial invasion per se should not be a contraindication to TI cancer resection. This study shows that cancers that invade the SA can be resected through an L-shaped transclavicular cervicotomy, with good results with a concomitant revascularization of the SA.  (+info)

(8/1718) Laparoscopic aortofemoral bypass grafting: human cadaveric and initial clinical experiences.

PURPOSE: Postoperative complications are mainly related to the surgical trauma derived from the extensive abdominal incision and dissection after a conventional aortofemoral bypass grafting procedure. In an attempt to reduce postoperative complications, a concept of video-endoscopic vascular surgery on the infrarenal aortoiliac artery has been developed. On the basis of our experience with the practicability of video-endoscopic vascular surgery in the pelvic region in an animal study and in a pilot study of human cadavers, the purpose of this report was to describe three different methods that we evaluated on human cadavers and that we partly applied to patients. METHODS: In this experimental study, three different approaches were used to perform video-endoscopic aortofemoral bypass grafting. We performed an observational trial on human corpses (n = 24) with the transabdominal-retroperitoneal approach (TARA), the extraperitoneal approach (EPA), and the transabdominal left paracolic approach (TAPA). The EPA also was applied to patients with aortoiliac occlusive diseases. RESULTS: The TARA on cadavers (n = 4) soon was abandoned because it caused a burdensome sliding of the intestine into the operative field adjacent to the renal vessels, particularly in cases with obese subjects. In comparison, the TAPA (n = 6) with right-sided positioning of the patient retained the intestine in the right upper abdomen throughout the procedure. Until a surgeon actually is acquainted with the anatomic landmarks and the laparoscopic preparation technique, the EPA (n = 14) is a challenging procedure that necessitates thorough training. As with the TAPA, the EPA represents a procedure that reveals constant exposure of the operating field, even in cases with obese subjects. In the clinical observational study (n = 7), aortobifemoral bypass grafting was achieved totally laparoscopically with the EPA. The mean operating time was 6.5 hours and ranged from 3 to 10 hours. Blood transfusions were necessary after surgery in three patients (range, 1 to 3 red packed blood cells). One patient, who had had occlusion of the inferior mesenteric artery, died of ischemic colitis at postoperative day 10. The other patients had uneventful postoperative courses with minor wound discomfort. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic vascular surgery seems to be a promising procedure to minimize postoperative complications. On the basis of our experience, we do not favor the TARA. Because it necessitates steep Trendelenburg positioning to displace intra-abdominal organs, the TARA is not an appropriate approach, particularly in obese and cardiopulmonary frail cases. Contrarily, the TAPA and the EPA deliver potentially better results in terms of exposing the operative field and thus reducing operating time and perioperative morbidity rates. A prospective cadaveric and clinical trial may be justified to further evaluate the use of these surgical techniques.  (+info)