Hybridization in large-bodied New World primates. (9/27)

Well-documented cases of natural hybridization among primates are not common. In New World primates, natural hybridization has been reported only for small-bodied species, but no genotypic data have ever been gathered that confirm these reports. Here we present genetic evidence of hybridization of two large-bodied species of neotropical primates that diverged approximately 3 MYA. We used species-diagnostic mitochondrial and microsatellite loci and the Y chromosome Sry gene to determine the hybrid status of 36 individuals collected from an area of sympatry in Tabasco, Mexico. Thirteen individuals were hybrids. We show that hybridization and subsequent backcrosses are directionally biased and that the only likely cross between parental species produces fertile hybrid females, but fails to produce viable or fertile males. This system can be used as a model to study gene interchange between primate species that have not achieved complete reproductive isolation.  (+info)

Circulation of antibodies against yellow fever virus in a simian population in the area of Porto Primavera Hydroelectric Plant, Sao Paulo, Brazil. (10/27)

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Vaccinia virus infection in monkeys, Brazilian Amazon. (11/27)

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Yellow fever virus maintenance in Trinidad and its dispersal throughout the Americas. (12/27)

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Isolation and genetic characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii from a red-handed howler monkey (Alouatta belzebul), a jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi), and a black-eared opossum (Didelphis aurita) from Brazil. (13/27)

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Structural adaptation of trabecular bone revealed by position resolved analysis of proximal femora of different primates. (14/27)

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Isolation of yellow fever virus (YFV) from naturally infected Haemagogus (Conopostegus) leucocelaenus (diptera, cukicudae) in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, 2009. (15/27)

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Seroepidemiological monitoring in sentinel animals and vectors as part of arbovirus surveillance in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. (16/27)

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