(1/476) A performance-based lottery to improve residential care and training by institutional staff.

Two experiments were conducted on four units of a residential facility for the multiply-handicapped retarded in an attempt to improve daily care and training services. Experiment I compared the effects of two procedures in maintaining the work performance of attendants, using an A-B design on two units. One procedure consisted of implementing specific staff-resident assignments, the other consisted of allowing attendants who had met performance criteria to be eligible for a weekly lottery in which they could win the opportunity to rearrange their days off for the following week. Results showed that the lottery was a more effective procedure as measured by the per cent of time attendants engaged in predefined target behaviors, and by their frequency of task completion in several areas of resident care. Experiment II replicated and extended these results to the area of work quality on two additional units, using a multiple-baseline design. The performance lottery was found to be an effective econimical procedure that could be implemented by supervisory staff on a large scale.  (+info)

(2/476) Use of SoloShot autodestruct syringes compared with disposable syringes, in a national immunization campaign in Indonesia.

Autodestruct syringes can reduce the improper reuse of syringes, which present a significant risk in the transmission of bloodborne pathogens in developing countries, especially during immunization campaigns owing to the high number of injections given per session. SoloShot is an autodestruct syringe, distributed by UNICEF, which has been shown to be safer and easier to use than standard syringes. This study analyses the accuracy and dose-efficiency of SoloShot, compared with disposable syringes, during a national tetanus toxoid immunization campaign on the Indonesian island of Lombok. Observation and dose measurements revealed that SoloShot syringes delivered more precise and consistent doses and 15% more doses per vial than disposable syringes. Vaccine savings may partially be offset by the higher price of SoloShot. Vaccinators preferred SoloShot, describing it as easier to use, faster, and more accurate than the disposable syringe. The study indicates that SoloShot is highly appropriate for use in immunization campaigns by reducing vaccine wastage and improving injection safety.  (+info)

(3/476) Evaluation of technician supervised treadmill exercise testing in a cardiac chest pain clinic.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy and safety of trained cardiac technicians independently performing treadmill exercise stress tests as part of the assessment of patients with suspected angina pectoris. DESIGN: Retrospective comparison of 250 exercise tests performed by cardiac technicians and 225 tests performed by experienced cardiology clinical assistants (general practitioners who perform regular NHS cardiology duties), and consultant cardiologists over the same time period. SETTING: Regional cardiac centre with a dedicated cardiac chest pain clinic. PATIENTS: All patients were referred by their general practitioners with a history of recent onset of chest pain, which was suspected to be angina pectoris. OUTCOME MEASURES: Peak workload achieved, symptoms, indications for termination, complications. RESULTS: The diagnostic yield of technician supervised tests (percentage positive or negative) was similar to that of medically supervised tests (76% v 69%, NS). The average peak workload achieved by patients was less by 1.2 mets (p < 0.005). This was probably due to more tests being terminated earlier due to chest pain and ST segment depression in the technician group compared with doctors (10% and 16% v 5% and 11% respectively, p = 0.06 and 0.07). One patient in the technician supervised group developed a supraventricular tachycardia during the recovery phase of the exercise test. CONCLUSIONS: Technician supervised stress testing is associated with a high diagnostic rate and low complication rate in patients with suspected ischaemic heart disease. Its efficacy is comparable to tests supervised by experienced doctors and its use should be encouraged.  (+info)

(4/476) Primary health care, community participation and community-financing: experiences of two middle hill villages in Nepal.

Although community involvement in health related activities is generally acknowledged by international and national health planners to be the key to the successful organization of primary health care, comparatively little is known about its potential and limitations. Drawing on the experiences of two middle hill villages in Nepal, this paper reports on research undertaken to compare and contrast the scope and extent of community participation in the delivery of primary health care in a community run and financed health post and a state run and financed health post. Unlike many other health posts in Nepal these facilities do provide effective curative services, and neither of them suffer from chronic shortage of drugs. However, community-financing did not appear to widen the scope and the extent of participation. Villagers in both communities relied on the health post for the treatment of less than one-third of symptoms, and despite the planners' intentions, community involvement outside participation in benefits was found to be very limited.  (+info)

(5/476) Resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: is survival dependent on who is available at the scene?

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is influenced by the on-scene availability of different grades of ambulance personnel and other health professionals. DESIGN: Population based, retrospective, observational study. SETTING: County of Nottinghamshire with a population of one million. SUBJECTS: All 2094 patients who had resuscitation attempted by Nottinghamshire Ambulance Service crew from 1991 to 1994; study of 1547 patients whose arrest were of cardiac aetiology. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival to hospital admission and survival to hospital discharge. RESULTS: Overall survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains poor: 221 patients (14.3%) survived to reach hospital alive and only 94 (6.1%) survived to be discharged from hospital. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the chances of those resuscitated by technician crew reaching hospital alive were poor but were greater when paramedic crew were either called to assist technicians or dealt with the arrest themselves (odds ratio 6.9 (95% confidence interval 3.92 to 26.61)). Compared to technician crew, survival to hospital discharge was only significantly improved with paramedic crew (3.55 (1.62 to 7.79)) and further improved when paramedics were assisted by either a health professional (9.91 (3.12 to 26.61)) or a medical practitioner (20.88 (6.72 to 64.94)). CONCLUSIONS: Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains poor despite attendance at the scene of the arrest by ambulance crew and other health professionals. Patients resuscitated by a paramedic from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by cardiac disease were more likely to survive to hospital discharge than when resuscitation was provided by an ambulance technician. Resuscitation by a paramedic assisted by a medical practitioner offers a patient the best chances of surviving the event.  (+info)

(6/476) Patient education in nuclear medicine technology practice.

This is the second article of a two-part series on patient education. This article builds on the first one by discussing some of the unique considerations in providing patient education in the nuclear medicine department. Concrete strategies for nuclear medicine technology practice are discussed here. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to: (a) describe the affective and technical aspects of the nuclear medicine technologist's role as a patient educator; (b) identify some strategies that nuclear medicine technologists can use to become better teachers; and (c) describe factors that affect patient learning in the nuclear medicine department and some approaches to overcome or minimize learning barriers.  (+info)

(7/476) Practical aspects of radiation safety for using fluorine-18.

The use of positron-emitting nuclides is becoming routine in nuclear medicine departments today. Introducing these nuclides into the nuclear medicine department can be a smooth transition by instituting educational lectures, radiation safety protocols and patient education. The radiation safety concerns of the technical staff, physicians and ancillary personnel are important and must be addressed. Nuclear medicine departments can be optimistic about implementing PET imaging while staying well within ALARA guidelines. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to: (a) describe at least three ways to reduce the radiation dose to the technologist during the performance of PET imaging procedures with 18F; (b) discuss the relationships between gamma-ray energy, the amount of activity administered to a patient, exposure time and occupational dose; and (c) describe one strategy to minimize the radiation dose to the bladder in patients who have received 18F.  (+info)

(8/476) Mapping the literature of perfusion.

Perfusionists select and operate the equipment necessary for monitoring, supporting, or temporarily replacing the patient's circulatory or respiratory function. There are over 3,000 perfusionists working in U.S. hospitals, medical and perfusionist groups, and as independent contractors. The purpose of this study was to identify the core literature of perfusion and to determine which major databases provide the most thorough access to this literature. This paper is part of the Medical Library Association Nursing and Allied Health Resource Section's project to map the literature of the allied health professions. It uses a bibliometric methodology to identify core journals. A group of forty-three journals was determined to make up the core journal literature of perfusion. MEDLINE provided the best overall indexing coverage for these journals, but librarians and perfusionists will wish to supplement its use with the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature in order to access the journals written primarily for perfusionists. The study results can guide purchasing and database searching decisions of collection development and reference librarians, encourage the database producer to increase coverage of titles that are unindexed or underindexed, and advise perfusionists of the best access to their core literature.  (+info)