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(1/199) Sexual victimization and reproductive health outcomes in urban youth.

OBJECTIVE: Adolescents and adults with a history of sexual victimization (SV) are at increased risk of engaging in sexual risk behaviors. This study seeks to examine race- and gender-based differences in SV as well as the association between SV and reproductive health outcomes (pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections [STIs]) among young adults from an urban community with high rates of both outcomes. METHODS: This study used cross-sectional data from the Young Adult Survey of the Baltimore Prevention Program's intervention trials. Participants initially enrolled as first graders were interviewed for the Young Adult Survey as they entered adulthood. A total of 1698 participants were asked about SV, pregnancy, and STIs. Data were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: History of SV did not vary by racial background, but female participants were more likely to report SV than their male peers. Results for models predicting STIs revealed a significant interaction between gender and SV. Adolescent girls who reported a SV were significantly more likely to have an STI than adolescent girls who did not report victimization. Both adolescent boys and girls who reported SV were more likely to report involvement in a pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Youth in urban communities with a history of SV are far more likely than those without victimization histories to have a pregnancy or STI before young adulthood. Further research is needed to explore the mediators of these outcomes and the value of sexual safety and child protection programs for pregnancy and STI prevention in urban environments.  (+info)

(2/199) Severity of childhood trauma is predictive of cocaine relapse outcomes in women but not men.

We prospectively examined the gender-specific effects of childhood trauma on cocaine relapse outcomes in an inpatient sample of treatment engaged cocaine dependent adults. Cocaine dependent men (n=70) and women (n=54) participating in inpatient treatment for cocaine dependence were assessed on severity of childhood trauma and followed for 90 days after discharge from treatment. Greater severity of childhood emotional abuse was associated with an increased risk of relapse in women. Severity of emotional abuse, sexual abuse, and overall childhood trauma was associated with the number of days cocaine was used during follow-up in women, as was the association of severity of physical abuse and overall childhood trauma with the average amount of cocaine used per occasion. No associations between childhood trauma and cocaine relapse outcomes were found in men. These findings demonstrate that childhood trauma increases the likelihood of cocaine relapse and drug use escalation after initial relapse in women but not in men. Comprehensive assessments of childhood trauma and specialized treatments that address trauma-related pathophysiology could be of benefit in improving cocaine treatment outcomes in women.  (+info)

(3/199) Childhood abuse or neglect is associated with increased vasomotor symptom reporting among midlife women.

OBJECTIVES: This study tested the hypothesis that women exposed to childhood abuse or neglect would have an increased likelihood of reporting hot flashes and night sweats during the menopausal transition. DESIGN: This hypothesis was evaluated in 332 white and African American women participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study, a prospective investigation of women transitioning through menopause. Childhood abuse and neglect were measured once with the Child Trauma Questionnaire. Vasomotor symptoms (any/none hot flashes, night sweats) were reported annually over 8 years. Associations between maltreatment and vasomotor symptoms were estimated with generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Childhood abuse or neglect was associated with increased reporting of hot flashes (odds ratio = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.23-2.43) and night sweats (odds ratio = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.26-2.43) in age-adjusted models. Results persisted in multivariable models and across several types of abuse and neglect. CONCLUSIONS: The experience of childhood abuse and neglect is associated with increased vasomotor symptom reporting in adulthood. The sequelae of childhood abuse and neglect may persist well into adulthood to influence the occurrence of vasomotor symptoms at midlife.  (+info)

(4/199) Population attributable fractions of psychiatric disorders and suicide ideation and attempts associated with adverse childhood experiences.

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(5/199) Disparities in child abuse victimization in lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women in the Nurses' Health Study II.

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(6/199) Obesity and type 2 diabetes risk in midadult life: the role of childhood adversity.

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(7/199) The association of prenatal cocaine use and childhood trauma with psychological symptoms over 6 years.

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(8/199) Adverse childhood experiences and prescription drug use in a cohort study of adult HMO patients.

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