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(1/587) Crystal structure of the cytoplasmic domain of the type I TGF beta receptor in complex with FKBP12.

Activation of the type I TGFbeta receptor (TbetaR-I) requires phosphorylation of a regulatory segment known as the GS region, located upstream of the serine/threonine kinase domain in the cytoplasmic portion of the receptor. The crystal structure of a fragment of unphosphorylated TbetaR-I, containing both the GS region and the catalytic domain, has been determined in complex with the FK506-binding protein FKBP12. TbetaR-I adopts an inactive conformation that is maintained by the unphosphorylated GS region. FKBP12 binds to the GS region of the receptor, capping the TbetaR-II phosphorylation sites and further stabilizing the inactive conformation of TbetaR-I. Certain structural features at the catalytic center of TbetaR-I are characteristic of tyrosine kinases rather than Ser/Thr kinases.  (+info)

(2/587) Transforming growth factor-beta induces formation of a dithiothreitol-resistant type I/Type II receptor complex in live cells.

Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) binds to and signals via two serine-threonine kinase receptors, the type I (TbetaRI) and type II (TbetaRII) receptors. We have used different and complementary techniques to study the physical nature and ligand dependence of the complex formed by TbetaRI and TbetaRII. Velocity centrifugation of endogenous receptors suggests that ligand-bound TbetaRI and TbetaRII form a heteromeric complex that is most likely a heterotetramer. Antibody-mediated immunofluorescence co-patching of epitope-tagged receptors provides the first evidence in live cells that TbetaRI. TbetaRII complex formation occurs at a low but measurable degree in the absence of ligand, increasing significantly after TGF-beta binding. In addition, we demonstrate that pretreatment of cells with dithiothreitol, which inhibits the binding of TGF-beta to TbetaRI, does not prevent formation of the TbetaRI.TbetaRII complex, but increases its sensitivity to detergent and prevents TGF-beta-activated TbetaRI from phosphorylating Smad3 in vitro. This indicates that either a specific conformation of the TbetaRI. TbetaRII complex, disrupted by dithiothreitol, or direct binding of TGF-beta to TbetaRI is required for signaling.  (+info)

(3/587) Interaction of 5-lipoxygenase with cellular proteins.

5-Lipoxygenase (5LO) plays a pivotal role in cellular leukotriene synthesis. To identify proteins interacting with human 5LO, we used a two-hybrid approach to screen a human lung cDNA library. From a total of 1.5 x 10(7) yeast transformants, nine independent clones representing three different proteins were isolated and found to specifically interact with 5LO. Four 1.7- to 1.8-kb clones represented a 16-kDa protein named coactosin-like protein for its significant homology with coactosin, a protein found to be associated with actin in Dictyostelium discoideum. Coactosin-like protein thus may provide a link between 5LO and the cytoskeleton. Two other yeast clones of 1.5 kb encoded transforming growth factor (TGF) type beta receptor-I-associated protein 1 partial cDNA. TGF type beta receptor-I-associated protein 1 recently has been reported to associate with the activated form of the TGF beta receptor I and may be involved in the TGF beta-induced up-regulation of 5LO expression and activity observed in HL-60 and Mono Mac 6 cells. Finally, three identical 2.1-kb clones contained the partial cDNA of a human protein with high homology to a hypothetical helicase K12H4. 8 from Caenorhabditis elegans and consequently was named DeltaK12H4. 8 homologue. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence revealed the presence of a RNase III motif and a double-stranded RNA binding domain, indicative of a protein of nuclear origin. The identification of these 5LO-interacting proteins provides additional approaches to studies of the cellular functions of 5LO.  (+info)

(4/587) Dominant-negative Smad2 mutants inhibit activin/Vg1 signaling and disrupt axis formation in Xenopus.

Smads are central mediators of signal transduction for the TGFbeta superfamily. However, the precise functions of Smad-mediated signaling pathways in early development are unclear. Here we demonstrate a requirement for Smad2 signaling in dorsoanterior axis formation during Xenopus development. Using two point mutations of Smad2 previously identified in colorectal carcinomas, we show that Smad2 ushers Smad4 to the nucleus to form a transcriptional activation complex with the nuclear DNA-binding protein FAST-1 and that the mutant proteins interact normally with FAST-1 but fail to recruit Smad4 into the nucleus. This mechanism of inhibition specifically restricts the dominant-negative activity of these mutants to the activin/Vg1 signaling pathway without inhibiting BMPs. Furthermore, expression of these mutants in Xenopus animal caps inhibits but does not abolish activin and Vg1 induction of mesoderm and in the embryo results in a truncated dorsoanterior axis. These studies define a mechanism through which mutations in Smad2 may block TGFbeta-dependent signaling and suggest a critical role for inductive signaling mediated by the Smad2 pathway in Xenopus organizer function.  (+info)

(5/587) A short loop on the ALK-2 and ALK-4 activin receptors regulates signaling specificity but cannot account for all their effects on early Xenopus development.

Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily, signals through a heteromeric complex of type I and type II serine-threonine kinase receptors. The two activin type I receptors previously identified, ALK-2 (ActR-I) and ALK-4 (ActR-IB), have distinct effects on gene expression, differentiation and morphogenesis in the Xenopus animal cap assay. ALK-4 reproduces the effects of activin treatment including the dose-dependent induction of progressively more dorso-anterior mesodermal and endodermal markers, whereas ALK-2 induces only ventral mesodermal markers and counteracts the effects of ALK-4. To identify regions of the receptors that determine signaling specificity we have generated chimeras of the constitutively active ALK-2 and ALK-4 receptors (termed ALK-2* and ALK-4*). The effects of these chimeric receptors on gene expression and morphogenetic movements implicate the loop between kinase subdomains IV and V in mediating the strong dorsal gene-inducing properties of ALK-4*; when the seven amino acids comprising this loop are transferred from ALK-4* to ALK-2*, the resulting chimeric receptor is capable of inducing the expression of dorsal-specific genes. In contrast, when the equivalent region of ALK-2* is transferred to the ALK-4* backbone it cannot effectively counteract the dorsalizing effects of ALK-4*, suggesting that other regions of type I receptors are also involved in determining signal specificity.  (+info)

(6/587) TAKs, thylakoid membrane protein kinases associated with energy transduction.

The phosphorylation of proteins within the eukaryotic photosynthetic membrane is thought to regulate a number of photosynthetic processes in land plants and algae. Both light quality and intensity influence protein kinase activity via the levels of reductants produced by the thylakoid electron transport chain. We have isolated a family of proteins called TAKs, Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane threonine kinases that phosphorylate the light harvesting complex proteins. TAK activity is enhanced by reductant and is associated with the photosynthetic reaction center II and the cytochrome b6f complex. TAKs are encoded by a gene family that has striking similarity to transforming growth factor beta receptors of metazoans. Thus thylakoid protein phosphorylation may be regulated by a cascade of reductant-controlled membrane-bound protein kinases.  (+info)

(7/587) The type I serine/threonine kinase receptor ActRIA (ALK2) is required for gastrulation of the mouse embryo.

ActRIA (or ALK2), one of the type I receptors of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily, can bind both activin and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in conjunction with the activin and BMP type II receptors, respectively. In mice, ActRIA is expressed primarily in the extraembryonic visceral endoderm before gastrulation and later in both embryonic and extraembryonic cells during gastrulation. To elucidate its function in mouse development, we disrupted the transmembrane domain of ActRIA by gene targeting. We showed that embryos homozygous for the mutation were arrested at the early gastrulation stage, displaying abnormal visceral endoderm morphology and severe disruption of mesoderm formation. To determine in which germ layer ActRIA functions during gastrulation, we performed reciprocal chimera analyses. (1) Homozygous mutant ES cells injected into wild-type blastocysts were able to contribute to all three definitive germ layers in chimeric embryos. However, a high contribution of mutant ES cells in chimeras disrupted normal development at the early somite stage. (2) Consistent with ActRIA expression in the extraembryonic cells, wild-type ES cells failed to rescue the gastrulation defect in chimeras in which the extraembryonic ectoderm and visceral endoderm were derived from homozygous mutant blastocysts. Furthermore, expression of HNF4, a key visceral endoderm-specific transcription regulatory factor, was significantly reduced in the mutant embryos. Together, our results indicate that ActRIA in extraembryonic cells plays a major role in early gastrulation, whereas ActRIA function is also required in embryonic tissues during later development in mice.  (+info)

(8/587) Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP)-dependent and -independent effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) on endochondral bone formation.

Previously, we showed that expression of a dominant-negative form of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor in skeletal tissue resulted in increased hypertrophic differentiation in growth plate and articular chondrocytes, suggesting a role for TGF-beta in limiting terminal differentiation in vivo. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) has also been demonstrated to regulate chondrocyte differentiation in vivo. Mice with targeted deletion of the PTHrP gene demonstrate increased endochondral bone formation, and misexpression of PTHrP in cartilage results in delayed bone formation due to slowed conversion of proliferative chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Since the development of skeletal elements requires the coordination of signals from several sources, this report tests the hypothesis that TGF-beta and PTHrP act in a common signal cascade to regulate endochondral bone formation. Mouse embryonic metatarsal bone rudiments grown in organ culture were used to demonstrate that TGF-beta inhibits several stages of endochondral bone formation, including chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation, and matrix mineralization. Treatment with TGF-beta1 also stimulated the expression of PTHrP mRNA. PTHrP added to cultures inhibited hypertrophic differentiation and matrix mineralization but did not affect cell proliferation. Furthermore, terminal differentiation was not inhibited by TGF-beta in metatarsal rudiments from PTHrP-null embryos; however, growth and matrix mineralization were still inhibited. The data support the model that TGF-beta acts upstream of PTHrP to regulate the rate of hypertrophic differentiation and suggest that TGF-beta has both PTHrP-dependent and PTHrP-independent effects on endochondral bone formation.  (+info)