RAB23 mutations in Carpenter syndrome imply an unexpected role for hedgehog signaling in cranial-suture development and obesity. (57/135)

Carpenter syndrome is a pleiotropic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance, the cardinal features of which include craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and cardiac defects. Using homozygosity mapping, we found linkage to chromosome 6p12.1-q12 and, in 15 independent families, identified five different mutations (four truncating and one missense) in RAB23, which encodes a member of the RAB guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) family of vesicle transport proteins and acts as a negative regulator of hedgehog (HH) signaling. In 10 patients, the disease was caused by homozygosity for the same nonsense mutation, L145X, that resides on a common haplotype, indicative of a founder effect in patients of northern European descent. Surprisingly, nonsense mutations of Rab23 in open brain mice cause recessive embryonic lethality with neural-tube defects, suggesting a species difference in the requirement for RAB23 during early development. The discovery of RAB23 mutations in patients with Carpenter syndrome implicates HH signaling in cranial-suture biogenesis--an unexpected finding, given that craniosynostosis is not usually associated with mutations of other HH-pathway components--and provides a new molecular target for studies of obesity.  (+info)

Apert p.Ser252Trp mutation in FGFR2 alters osteogenic potential and gene expression of cranial periosteal cells. (58/135)

Apert syndrome (AS), a severe form of craniosynostosis, is caused by dominant gain-of-function mutations in FGFR2. Because the periosteum contribution to AS cranial pathophysiology is unknown, we tested the osteogenic potential of AS periosteal cells (p.Ser252Trp mutation) and observed that these cells are more committed toward the osteoblast lineage. To delineate the gene expression profile involved in this abnormal behavior, we performed a global gene expression analysis of coronal suture periosteal cells from seven AS patients (p.Ser252Trp), and matched controls. We identified 263 genes with significantly altered expression in AS samples (118 upregulated, 145 downregulated; SNR >or= |0.4|, P +info)

Crouzons syndrome: a case report. (59/135)

Human skull is made up of many bone joints connected by sutures. The sutures fuse in later life after the complete growth of the brain. If any of these sutures closes early, it may interfere with the normal growth of the brain. The developing brain may exert pressure on the skull and may grow in the direction of the other open sutures. Premature sutural fusion may occur alone or together with other anomalies, making up various syndromes. Crouzons syndrome is an example of such a syndrome that is associated with premature synostosis of the sutures of the skull. Presented in this article is a case of Crouzons syndrome seen in a boy aged 9 years.  (+info)

An intraoperative unexpected respiratory problem in a patient with Apert syndrome. (60/135)

We present a case of a 5-year-old child who underwent four operations (three for syndactyly of the hands and one for craniofacial corrections). At the third hour of his craniofacial operation, his EtCO2 started to increase and airway resistance was encountered during manual ventilation. The position of the head and neck was checked. An increase in secretion with oral and endotracheal aspiration and a decrease in saturation were observed. When breath sounds disappeared, the patient was reintubated orally. The nasal tube was obstructed with a mucolytic plug. There was no problem during the other operations. This case is presented since anaesthesiologists should be aware of the high incidence of respiratory complications in Apert syndrome.  (+info)

Unravelling the molecular control of calvarial suture fusion in children with craniosynostosis. (61/135)

BACKGROUND: Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of calvarial sutures, is a common craniofacial abnormality. Causative mutations in more than 10 genes have been identified, involving fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and Eph/ephrin signalling pathways. Mutations affect each human calvarial suture (coronal, sagittal, metopic, and lambdoid) differently, suggesting different gene expression patterns exist in each human suture. To better understand the molecular control of human suture morphogenesis we used microarray analysis to identify genes differentially expressed during suture fusion in children with craniosynostosis. Expression differences were also analysed between each unfused suture type, between sutures from syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis patients, and between unfused sutures from individuals with and without craniosynostosis. RESULTS: We identified genes with increased expression in unfused sutures compared to fusing/fused sutures that may be pivotal to the maintenance of suture patency or in controlling early osteoblast differentiation (i.e. RBP4, GPC3, C1QTNF3, IL11RA, PTN, POSTN). In addition, we have identified genes with increased expression in fusing/fused suture tissue that we suggest could have a role in premature suture fusion (i.e. WIF1, ANXA3, CYFIP2). Proteins of two of these genes, glypican 3 and retinol binding protein 4, were investigated by immunohistochemistry and localised to the suture mesenchyme and osteogenic fronts of developing human calvaria, respectively, suggesting novel roles for these proteins in the maintenance of suture patency or in controlling early osteoblast differentiation. We show that there is limited difference in whole genome expression between sutures isolated from patients with syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis and confirmed this by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, distinct expression profiles for each unfused suture type were noted, with the metopic suture being most disparate. Finally, although calvarial bones are generally thought to grow without a cartilage precursor, we show histologically and by identification of cartilage-specific gene expression that cartilage may be involved in the morphogenesis of lambdoid and posterior sagittal sutures. CONCLUSION: This study has provided further insight into the complex signalling network which controls human calvarial suture morphogenesis and craniosynostosis. Identified genes are candidates for targeted therapeutic development and to screen for craniosynostosis-causing mutations.  (+info)

Case report: multiple fractures in a patient with mutations of TWIST1 and TNSALP. (62/135)

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The study of abnormal bone development in the Apert syndrome Fgfr2+/S252W mouse using a 3D hydrogel culture model. (63/135)

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Monoblock craniofacial internal distraction in a child with Pfeiffer syndrome: a case report. (64/135)

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