Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Emergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Air Ambulances: Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems: The use of communication systems, such as telecommunication, to transmit emergency information to appropriate providers of health services.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Transportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.Emergency Nursing: The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Mobile Health Units: Movable or portable facilities in which diagnostic and therapeutic services are provided to the community.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)First Aid: Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.Ambulance Diversion: The practice of redirecting ambulances and patients seeking urgent care from one emergency department to others for various reasons such as overcrowding and shortage of skilled staff.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Coronary Care Units: The hospital unit in which patients with acute cardiac disorders receive intensive care.EnglandTime and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.Patient Transfer: Interfacility or intrahospital transfer of patients. Intrahospital transfer is usually to obtain a specific kind of care and interfacility transfer is usually for economic reasons as well as for the type of care provided.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Heat Stroke: A condition caused by the failure of body to dissipate heat in an excessively hot environment or during PHYSICAL EXERTION in a hot environment. Contrast to HEAT EXHAUSTION, the body temperature in heat stroke patient is dangerously high with red, hot skin accompanied by DELUSIONS; CONVULSIONS; or COMA. It can be a life-threatening emergency and is most common in infants and the elderly.Fee Schedules: A listing of established professional service charges, for specified dental and medical procedures.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Crowding: An excessive number of individuals, human or animal, in relation to available space.BerlinElectric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Aircraft: A weight-carrying structure for navigation of the air that is supported either by its own buoyancy or by the dynamic action of the air against its surfaces. (Webster, 1973)Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.