Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Theft: Unlawful act of taking property.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Criminals: Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Police: Agents of the law charged with the responsibility of maintaining and enforcing law and order among the citizenry.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.National Socialism: The doctrines and policies of the Nazis or the National Social German Workers party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933-1945. These doctrines and policies included racist nationalism, expansionism, and state control of the economy. (from Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. and American Heritage College Dictionary, 3d ed.)Criminology: The study of crime and criminals with special reference to the personality factors and social conditions leading toward, or away from crime.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Urban Renewal: The planned upgrading of a deteriorating urban area, involving rebuilding, renovation, or restoration. It frequently refers to programs of major demolition and rebuilding of blighted areas.Forensic Sciences: Disciplines that apply sciences to law. Forensic sciences include a wide range of disciplines, such as FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY; FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY; FORENSIC MEDICINE; FORENSIC DENTISTRY; and others.Environment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Forensic Genetics: The application of genetic analyses and MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES to legal matters and crime analysis.Forensic Psychiatry: Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Holocaust: A massive slaughter, especially the systematic mass extermination of European Jews in Nazi concentration camps prior to and during World War II.Architecture as Topic: The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.Forensic Pathology: The application of pathology to questions of law.Milieu Therapy: A treatment program based on manipulation of the patient's environment by the medical staff. The patient does not participate in planning the treatment regimen.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.PrisonersInfanticide: The killing of infants at birth or soon after.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.EponymsFiresetting Behavior: A compulsion to set fires.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Blood Stains: Antigenic characteristics and DNA fingerprint patterns identified from blood stains. Their primary value is in criminal cases.Capital Punishment: The use of the death penalty for certain crimes.Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Prisons: Penal institutions, or places of confinement for war prisoners.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Lie Detection: Ascertaining of deception through detection of emotional disturbance as manifested by changes in physiologic processes usually using a polygraph.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.World War II: Global conflict involving countries of Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America that occurred between 1939 and 1945.City Planning: Comprehensive planning for the physical development of the city.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.