Cardiac sympathetic activity estimated by 123I-MIBG myocardial imaging in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy after beta-blocker or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy. (1/4352)

Impaired cardiac sympathetic activity can be evaluated by 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging. METHODS: We studied the significance of MIBG imaging for 24 patients (age 58+/-12 y) with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We compared 12 patients (group A) treated with metoprolol (dose from 30-60 mg/d) with 12 patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Patients were studied before treatment, after 5 mo of treatment (only in group A) and after 1 y of treatment. Cardiac MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart-to-mediastinum activity ratio (H/M) and total defect score (TDS) from anterior planar and SPECT MIBG images, which were acquired in 4 h after tracer injection. New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) calculated by echocardiography were also assessed. RESULTS: TDS decreased in both groups (in group A, from 30+/-7 through 23+/-9 to 18+/-10; P < 0.01, in group B, from 30+/-6 to 24+/-8; P < 0.01) and H/M was increased in both groups (in group A, from 1.87+/-0.31 through 2.03+/-0.28 to 2.14+/-0.29; P < 0.01, in group B, from 1.82+/-0.28 to 1.94+/-0.26; P < 0.05). But TDS and H/M were more improved in group A than in group B (P < 0.05). LVEF was significantly increased in only group A (from 38+/-6 through 43+/-8 to 49%+/-9%; P < 0.01). NYHA improved in both groups (in group A, from mean 2.5 through 2.1 to 1.8; P < 0.01, in group B, from mean 2.6 to 2.1; P < 0.05) but was more improved in group A than in group B (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Cardiac function, symptom and cardiac sympathetic activity evaluated by MIBG images improved after the beta-blocker therapy more than with the treatment that used ACE inhibitors.  (+info)

Enhanced myocardial glucose use in patients with a deficiency in long-chain fatty acid transport (CD36 deficiency). (2/4352)

CD36 is a multifunctional, 88 kDa glycoprotein that is expressed on platelets and monocytes/macrophages. CD36 also has high homology with the long-chain fatty acid (LFA) transporter in the myocardium. Although platelet and monocyte CD36 levels can indicate a CD36 deficiency, they cannot predict specific clinical manifestations in the myocardium of a given person. We examined the hypothesis that a deficiency in LFA transport augments myocardial glucose uptake in patients with a type I CD36 deficiency. METHODS: Seven fasting patients with a type I CD36 deficiency and 9 controls were assessed by cardiac radionuclide imaging using beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) as a LFA tracer and by PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). RESULTS: None of the patients with a CD36 deficiency showed myocardial uptake of BMIPP. The percentage dose uptake of BMIPP in these subjects was significantly lower than that in normal controls (1.31+/-0.24 versus 2.90+/-0.2; P < 0.005). PET studies revealed that myocardial FDG accumulation was substantially increased in patients with a CD36 deficiency. Quantitative analysis showed that the percentage dose uptake of FDG in patients with a CD36 deficiency was significantly higher than that in normal controls (1.28+/-0.35 versus 0.43+/-0.22; P< 0.01). CONCLUSION: CD36 functions as a major myocardial LFA transporter and its absence may cause a compensatory upregulation of myocardial glucose uptake.  (+info)

Parametric mapping of cerebral blood flow deficits in Alzheimer's disease: a SPECT study using HMPAO and image standardization technique. (3/4352)

This study assessed the accuracy and reliability of Automated Image Registration (AIR) for standardization of brain SPECT images of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Standardized cerebral blood flow (CBF) images of patients with AD and control subjects were then used for group comparison and covariance analyses. METHODS: Thirteen patients with AD at an early stage (age 69.8+/-7.1 y, Clinical Dementia Rating Score 0.5-1.0, Mini-Mental State Examination score 19-23) and 20 age-matched normal subjects (age 69.5+/-8.3 y) participated in this study. 99mTc-hexamethyl propylenamine oxime (HMPAO) brain SPECT and CT scans were acquired for each subject. SPECT images were transformed to a standard size and shape with the help of AIR. Accuracy of AIR for spatial normalization was evaluated by an index calculated on SPECT images. Anatomical variability of standardized target images was evaluated by measurements on corresponding CT scans, spatially normalized using transformations established by the SPECT images. Realigned brain SPECT images of patients and controls were used for group comparison with the help of statistical parameter mapping. Significant differences were displayed on the respective voxel to generate three-dimensional Z maps. CT scans of individual subjects were evaluated by a computer program for brain atrophy. Voxel-based covariance analysis was performed on standardized images with ages and atrophy indices as independent variables. RESULTS: Inaccuracy assessed by functional data was 2.3%. The maximum anatomical variability was 4.9 mm after standardization. Z maps showed significantly decreased regional CBF (rCBF) in the frontal, parietal and temporal regions in the patient group (P < 0.001). Covariance analysis revealed that the effects of aging on rCBF were more pronounced compared with atrophy, especially in intact cortical areas at an early stage of AD. Decrease in rCBF was partly due to senility and atrophy, however these two factors cannot explain all the deficits. CONCLUSION: AIR can transform SPECT images of AD patients with acceptable accuracy without any need for corresponding structural images. The frontal regions of the brain, in addition to parietal and temporal lobes, may show reduced CBF in patients with AD even at an early stage of dementia. The reduced rCBF in the cortical regions cannot be explained entirely by advanced atrophy and fast aging process.  (+info)

Integrated visualization of functional and anatomic brain data: a validation study. (4/4352)

Two-dimensional SPECT display and three methods for integrated visualization of SPECT and MRI patient data are evaluated in a multiobserver study to determine whether localization of functional data can be improved by adding anatomical information to the display. METHODS: SPECT and MRI data of 30 patients were gathered and presented using four types of display: one of SPECT in isolation, two integrated two-dimensional displays and one integrated three-dimensional display. Cold and hot spots in the peripheral cortex were preselected and indicated on black-and-white hard copies of the image data. Nuclear medicine physicians were asked to assign the corresponding spots in the image data on the computer screen to a lobe and a gyrus and give a confidence rating for both localizations. Interobserver agreement using kappa statistics and average confidence ratings were assessed to interpret the reported observations. RESULTS: Both the interobserver agreement and the confidence of the observers were greater for the integrated two-dimensional displays than for the two-dimensional SPECT display. An additional increase in agreement and confidence was seen with the integrated three-dimensional display. CONCLUSION: Integrated display of SPECT and MR brain images provides better localization of cerebral blood perfusion abnormalities in the peripheral cortex in relation to the anatomy of the brain than single-modality display and increases the confidence of the observer.  (+info)

Using vascular structure for CT-SPECT registration in the pelvis. (5/4352)

The authors outline a method for three-dimensional registration of pelvic CT and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibody capromab pendetide (111In MoAb 7E11.C5) images using 99mTc-labeled red blood cell SPECT data. METHODS: This method of CT-SPECT registration relies on the identification of major blood vessels in the CT and 99mTc SPECT images. The vessels are segmented from the image datasets by outlining them on transverse planar slices using a mouse-based drawing tool. Stacking the transverse outlines provides a three-dimensional representation of the vascular structures. Registration is performed by matching the surfaces of the segmented volumes. Dual isotope acquisition of 111In and 99mTc activities provides precise SPECT-SPECT registration so that registration in three dimensions of the 111In MoAb and CT images is achieved by applying the same transformation obtained from the 99mTc SPECT-CT registration. RESULTS: This method provided accurate registration of pelvic structures and significantly improved interpretation of 111In MoAb 7E11.C5 exams. Furthermore, sites of involvement by prostate cancer suggested by the 111In MoAb examination could be interpreted with the bony and soft tissue (nodal) anatomy seen on CT. CONCLUSION: This method is a general clinical tool for the registration of pelvic CT and SPECT imaging data. There are immediate applications in conformal radiation therapy treatment planning for certain prostate cancer patients.  (+info)

MIRD pamphlet no. 16: Techniques for quantitative radiopharmaceutical biodistribution data acquisition and analysis for use in human radiation dose estimates. (6/4352)

This report describes recommended techniques for radiopharmaceutical biodistribution data acquisition and analysis in human subjects to estimate radiation absorbed dose using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. The document has been prepared in a format to address two audiences: individuals with a primary interest in designing clinical trials who are not experts in dosimetry and individuals with extensive experience with dosimetry-based protocols and calculational methodology. For the first group, the general concepts involved in biodistribution data acquisition are presented, with guidance provided for the number of measurements (data points) required. For those with expertise in dosimetry, highlighted sections, examples and appendices have been included to provide calculational details, as well as references, for the techniques involved. This document is intended also to serve as a guide for the investigator in choosing the appropriate methodologies when acquiring and preparing product data for review by national regulatory agencies. The emphasis is on planar imaging techniques commonly available in most nuclear medicine departments and laboratories. The measurement of the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals is an important aspect in calculating absorbed dose from internally deposited radionuclides. Three phases are presented: data collection, data analysis and data processing. In the first phase, data collection, the identification of source regions, the determination of their appropriate temporal sampling and the acquisition of data are discussed. In the second phase, quantitative measurement techniques involving imaging by planar scintillation camera, SPECT and PET for the calculation of activity in source regions as a function of time are discussed. In addition, nonimaging measurement techniques, including external radiation monitoring, tissue-sample counting (blood and biopsy) and excreta counting are also considered. The third phase, data processing, involves curve-fitting techniques to integrate the source time-activity curves (determining the area under these curves). For some applications, compartmental modeling procedures may be used. Last, appendices are included that provide a table of symbols and definitions, a checklist for study protocol design, example formats for quantitative imaging protocols, temporal sampling error analysis techniques and selected calculational examples. The utilization of the presented approach should aid in the standardization of protocol design for collecting kinetic data and in the calculation of absorbed dose estimates.  (+info)

Chronic compartment syndrome affecting the lower limb: MIBI perfusion imaging as an alternative to pressure monitoring: two case reports. (7/4352)

Intracompartmental pressure monitoring remains the primary method of diagnosing chronic compartment syndrome. MIBI perfusion imaging is widely available and offers a radionuclear imaging technique for diagnosing this condition. Although the results are not identical with those from pressure monitoring, MIBI may offer a useful screening test for this condition.  (+info)

Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with high exercise tolerance. (8/4352)

BACKGROUND: Although high exercise tolerance is associated with an excellent prognosis, the significance of abnormal myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in patients with high exercise tolerance has not been established. This study retrospectively compares the utility of MPI and exercise ECG (EECG) in these patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Of 388 consecutive patients who underwent exercise MPI and reached at least Bruce stage IV, 157 (40.5%) had abnormal results and 231 (59.5%) had normal results. Follow-up was performed at 18+/-2.7 months. Adverse events, including revascularization, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death, occurred in 40 patients. Nineteen patients had revascularization related to the MPI results or the patient's condition at the time of MPI and were not included in further analysis. Seventeen patients (12.2%) with abnormal MPI and 4 (1.7%) with normal MPI had adverse cardiac events (P<0.001). Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis showed that MPI was an excellent predictor of cardiac events (global chi2=13.2; P<0.001; relative risk=8; 95% CI=3 to 23) but EECG had no predictive power (global chi2=0.05; P=0.8; relative risk=1; 95% CI=0.4 to 3.0). The addition of Duke's treadmill score risk categories did not improve the predictive power of EECG (global chi2=0.17). The predictive power of the combination of EECG (including Duke score categories) and MPI was no better than that of MPI alone (global chi2=13.5). CONCLUSIONS: Unlike EECG, MPI is an excellent prognostic indicator for adverse cardiac events in patients with known or suspected CAD and high exercise tolerance.  (+info)