(1/2377) The developmental basis for allometry in insects.

Within all species of animals, the size of each organ bears a specific relationship to overall body size. These patterns of organ size relative to total body size are called static allometry and have enchanted biologists for centuries, yet the mechanisms generating these patterns have attracted little experimental study. We review recent and older work on holometabolous insect development that sheds light on these mechanisms. In insects, static allometry can be divided into at least two processes: (1) the autonomous specification of organ identity, perhaps including the approximate size of the organ, and (2) the determination of the final size of organs based on total body size. We present three models to explain the second process: (1) all organs autonomously absorb nutrients and grow at organ-specific rates, (2) a centralized system measures a close correlate of total body size and distributes this information to all organs, and (3) autonomous organ growth is combined with feedback between growing organs to modulate final sizes. We provide evidence supporting models 2 and 3 and also suggest that hormones are the messengers of size information. Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of allometry will come through the integrated study of whole tissues using techniques from development, genetics, endocrinology and population biology.  (+info)

(2/2377) The homeobox gene Pitx2: mediator of asymmetric left-right signaling in vertebrate heart and gut looping.

Left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is controlled by activities emanating from the left lateral plate. How these signals get transmitted to the forming organs is not known. A candidate mediator in mouse, frog and zebrafish embryos is the homeobox gene Pitx2. It is asymmetrically expressed in the left lateral plate mesoderm, tubular heart and early gut tube. Localized Pitx2 expression continues when these organs undergo asymmetric looping morphogenesis. Ectopic expression of Xnr1 in the right lateral plate induces Pitx2 transcription in Xenopus. Misexpression of Pitx2 affects situs and morphology of organs. These experiments suggest a role for Pitx2 in promoting looping of the linear heart and gut.  (+info)

(3/2377) A Drosophila doublesex-related gene, terra, is involved in somitogenesis in vertebrates.

The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene encodes a transcription factor that mediates sex determination. We describe the characterization of a novel zebrafish zinc-finger gene, terra, which contains a DNA binding domain similar to that of the Drosophila dsx gene. However, unlike dsx, terra is transiently expressed in the presomitic mesoderm and newly formed somites. Expression of terra in presomitic mesoderm is restricted to cells that lack expression of MyoD. In vivo, terra expression is reduced by hedgehog but enhanced by BMP signals. Overexpression of terra induces rapid apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that a tight regulation of terra expression is required during embryogenesis. Terra has both human and mouse homologs and is specifically expressed in mouse somites. Taken together, our findings suggest that terra is a highly conserved protein that plays specific roles in early somitogenesis of vertebrates.  (+info)

(4/2377) Evidence for a correlation between the number of marginal band microtubules and the size of vertebrate erthrocytes.

In 23 species of vertebrates the dimensions of erythrocytes and the number of their marginal band microtubules were examined. A positive correlation was found between the size of erythrocytes and the number of microtubules. The absence of microtubules in diskoid erythrocytes of mammals-Camelidae-is discussed.  (+info)

(5/2377) The GTPase activating factor for transducin in rod photoreceptors is the complex between RGS9 and type 5 G protein beta subunit.

Proteins of the regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) family modulate the duration of intracellular signaling by stimulating the GTPase activity of G protein alpha subunits. It has been established that the ninth member of the RGS family (RGS9) participates in accelerating the GTPase activity of the photoreceptor-specific G protein, transducin. This process is essential for timely inactivation of the phototransduction cascade during the recovery from a photoresponse. Here we report that functionally active RGS9 from vertebrate photoreceptors exists as a tight complex with the long splice variant of the G protein beta subunit (Gbeta5L). RGS9 and Gbeta5L also form a complex when coexpressed in cell culture. Our data are consistent with the recent observation that several RGS proteins, including RGS9, contain G protein gamma-subunit like domain that can mediate their association with Gbeta5 (Snow, B. E., Krumins, A. M., Brothers, G. M., Lee, S. F., Wall, M. A., Chung, S., Mangion, J., Arya, S., Gilman, A. G. & Siderovski, D. P. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 13307-13312). We report an example of such a complex whose cellular localization and function are clearly defined.  (+info)

(6/2377) DNA replication in vertebrates requires a homolog of the Cdc7 protein kinase.

CDC7 is an essential gene required for DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cdc7p homologs have recently been identified in vertebrates, but their role in DNA replication has not yet been addressed. Here we show that antibodies to the Xenopus laevis homolog, xCdc7, interfere with DNA replication in vivo in developing embryos and in vitro in cycling egg extracts. We also demonstrate cell cycle-dependent association of xCdc7 with the Mcm complex, which binds to replication origins and also is required for DNA synthesis. Taken together, these data indicate that the function of xCdc7 is conserved from fungi to vertebrates. xCdc7 protein accumulates after stimulation of resting oocytes with progesterone, suggesting a molecular explanation for previous observations that the development of the capacity for DNA replication requires protein synthesis late in meiosis I.  (+info)

(7/2377) Preservation of key biomolecules in the fossil record: current knowledge and future challenges.

We have developed a model based on the analyses of modern and Pleistocene eggshells and mammalian bones which can be used to understand the preservation of amino acids and other important biomolecules such as DNA in fossil specimens. The model is based on the following series of diagenetic reactions and processes involving amino acids: the hydrolysis of proteins and the subsequent loss of hydrolysis products from the fossil matrix with increasing geologic age; the racemization of amino acids which produces totally racemized amino acids in 10(5)-10(6) years in most environments on the Earth; the introduction of contaminants into the fossil that lowers the enantiomeric (D:L) ratios produced via racemization; and the condensation reactions between amino acids, as well as other compounds with primary amino groups, and sugars which yield humic acid-like polymers. This model was used to evaluate whether useful amino acid and DNA sequence information is preserved in a variety of human, amber-entombed insect and dinosaur specimens. Most skeletal remains of evolutionary interest with respect to the origin of modern humans are unlikely to preserve useful biomolecular information although those from high latitude sites may be an exception. Amber-entombed insects contain well-preserved unracemized amino acids, apparently because of the anhydrous nature of the amber matrix, and thus may contain DNA fragments which have retained meaningful genetic information. Dinosaur specimens contain mainly exogenous amino acids, although traces of endogenous amino acids may be present in some cases. Future ancient biomolecule research which takes advantage of new methologies involving, for example, humic acid cleaving reagents and microchip-based DNA-protein detection and sequencing, along with investigations of very slow biomolecule diagenetic reactions such as the racemization of isoleucine at the beta-carbon, will lead to further enhancements of our understanding of biomolecule preservation in the fossil record.  (+info)

(8/2377) Biochemical characterization of Wnt-frizzled interactions using a soluble, biologically active vertebrate Wnt protein.

Biochemical studies of Wnt signaling have been hampered by difficulties in obtaining large quantities of soluble, biologically active Wnt proteins. In this paper, we report the production in Drosophila S2 cells of biologically active Xenopus Wnt8 (XWnt8). Epitope- or alkaline phosphatase-tagged XWnt8 proteins are secreted by concentrated S2 cells in a form that is suitable for quantitative biochemical experiments with yields of 5 and 0.5 mg per liter, respectively. Conditions also are described for the production in 293 cells of an IgG fusion of the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of mouse Frizzled 8 with a yield of 20 mg/liter. We demonstrate the use of these proteins for studying the interactions between soluble XWnt8 and various Frizzled proteins, membrane anchored or secreted CRDs, and a set of insertion mutants in the CRD of Drosophila Frizzled 2. In a solid phase binding assay, the affinity of the XWnt8-alkaline phosphatase fusion for the purified mouse Frizzled 8-CRD-IgG fusion is approximately 9 nM.  (+info)