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(1/9164) Myocardial uptake of digoxin in chronically digitalized dogs.

1 The time course of myocardial uptake of digoxin, increase in contractility and changes in myocardial potassium concentration was studied for 90 min following an intravenous digoxin dose to long-term digitalized dogs. 2 Nineteen dogs were investigated by the use of a biopsy technique which allowed sampling before and after administration of digoxin. 3 Ten minutes after administration of digoxin the myocardial concentration increased from 60 to 306 nmol/kg tissue, the myocardial concentration of digoxin was significantly lower (250 nmol/kg tissue) after 30 min and then increased again. 4 The transmural myocardial distribution of digoxin was uniform before and 90 min after administration of digoxin in long-term digitalized dogs but at 10 min after administration, both the subepicardial and the subendocardial concentration of digoxin were significantly lower than that of the mesocardial layer. 5 During the first 10 min the dp/dtmax increased to 135% of the control level. The increase remained unchanged during the rest of the study. 6 Myocardial potassium decreased throughout the study. 7 The M-configuration of the myocardial uptake curve and the non-uniformity of myocardial distribution of digoxin observed at 10 min after administrating digoxin to long-term digitalized dogs indicate that the distribution of myocardial blood flow may be changed during chronic digitalization.  (+info)

(2/9164) Ventricular pressure-volume curve indices change with end-diastolic pressure.

Many indices have been proposed to describee the diastolic pressure-volume curve mathematically and permit quantification of the elastic properties of the myocardium itself in hopes that changes in the muscle caused by disease would b.e reflected in the diastolic pressure-volume curve. To date, none of the proposed indices has been shown convincingly to discriminate one group of patients from another. While this situation in part arises from the relatively large amount of noise introduced by the technical difficulties of measuring synchronous pressures and volumes during diastole in man, ther is a more fundamental difficulty. In practice, one can measure only a short segment of the entire pressure-volume curve, and the values of all diastolic pressure-volume curve parameters investigated change significantly when one uses different segments of the same pressure-volume curve to compute them. These results were derived from relatively noise-free pressure-volume curves obtained by filling nine excised dog left ventricles at a known rate and monitoring pressure-volume curve used to compute the parameter. Merely increasing measurement fidelity will not resolve this problem, because none of these parameters accurately characterizes the entire diastolic pressure-volume curbe from a segment like that which one can reasonably expect to obtain from humans.  (+info)

(3/9164) The effect of cardiac contraction on collateral resistance in the canine heart.

We determined whether the coronary collateral vessels develop an increased resistance to blood flow during systole as does the cognate vascular bed. Collateral resistance was estimated by measuring retrograde flow rate from a distal branch of the left anterior descending coronary artery while the main left coronary artery was perfused at a constant pressure. Retrograde flow rate was measured before and during vagal arrest. We found that in 10 dogs the prolonged diastole experienced when the heart was stopped caused no significant change in the retrograde flow rate, which indicated that systole has little effect on the collateral resistance. However, when left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was altered by changing afterload or contractility, a direct relationship between end-diastolic pressure and collateral resistance was noted.  (+info)

(4/9164) Evaluation of the force-frequency relationship as a descriptor of the inotropic state of canine left ventricular myocardium.

The short-term force-frequency characteristics of canine left ventricular myocardium were examined in both isolated and intact preparations by briefly pertubing the frequency of contraction with early extrasystoles. The maximum rate of rise of isometric tension (Fmas) of the isolated trabeculae carneae was potentiated by the introduction of extrasystoles. The ratio of Fmas of potentiated to control beats (force-frequency ratio) was not altered significantly by a change in muscle length. However, exposure of the trabeculae to isoproterenol (10(-7)M) significantly changed the force-frequency ratio obtained in response to a constant frequency perturbation. Similar experiments were performed on chronically instrumented conscious dogs. Left ventricular minor axis diameter was measured with implanted pulse-transit ultrasonic dimension transducers, and intracavitary pressure was measured with a high fidelity micromanometer. Atrial pacing was performed so that the end-diastolic diameters of the beats preceding and following the extrasystole could be made identical. Large increases in the maximum rate of rise of pressure (Pmas) were seen in the contraction after the extrasystole. The ratio of Pmax of the potentiated beat to that of the control beat was not changed by a 9% increase in the end-diastolic diameter, produced by saline infusion. Conversely, isoproterenol significantly altered this relationship in the same manner as in the isolated muscle. Thus, either in vitro or in situ, left ventricular myocardium exhibits large functional changes in response to brief perturbations in rate. The isoproterenol and length data indicate that the force-frequency ratio reflects frequency-dependent changes in the inotropic state, independent of changes in length.  (+info)

(5/9164) Adenoviral gene transfer of the human V2 vasopressin receptor improves contractile force of rat cardiomyocytes.

BACKGROUND: In congestive heart failure, high systemic levels of the hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) result in vasoconstriction and reduced cardiac contractility. These effects are mediated by the V1 vasopressin receptor (V1R) coupled to phospholipase C beta-isoforms. The V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R), which promotes activation of the Gs/adenylyl cyclase system, is physiologically expressed in the kidney but not in the myocardium. Expression of a recombinant V2R (rV2R) in the myocardium could result in a positive inotropic effect via the endogenous high concentrations of AVP in heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: A recombinant adenovirus encoding the human V2R (Ad-V2R) was tested for its ability to modulate the cardiac Gs/adenylyl cyclase system and to potentiate contractile force in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes and in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Ad-V2R infection resulted in a virus concentration-dependent expression of the transgene and led to a marked increase in cAMP formation in rV2R-expressing cardiomyocytes after exposure to AVP. Single-cell shortening measurements showed a significant agonist-induced contraction amplitude enhancement, which was blocked by the V2R antagonist, SR 121463A. Pretreatment of Ad-V2R-infected cardiomyocytes with AVP led to desensitization of the rV2R after short-term agonist exposure but did not lead to further loss of receptor function or density after long-term agonist incubation, thus demonstrating resistance of the rV2R to downregulation. CONCLUSIONS: Adenoviral gene transfer of the V2R in cardiomyocytes can modulate the endogenous adenylyl cyclase-signal transduction cascade and can potentiate contraction amplitude in cardiomyocytes. Heterologous expression of cAMP-forming receptors in the myocardium could lead to novel strategies in congestive heart failure by bypassing the desensitized beta-adrenergic receptor signaling.  (+info)

(6/9164) Myocardial oxygenation during high work states in hearts with postinfarction remodeling.

BACKGROUND: Postinfarction left ventricular remodeling (LVR) is associated with reductions in myocardial high-energy phosphate (HEP) levels, which are more severe in animals that develop overt congestive heart failure (CHF). During high work states, further HEP loss occurs, which suggests demand-induced ischemia. This study tested the hypothesis that inadequate myocyte oxygen availability is the basis for these HEP abnormalities. METHODS AND RESULTS: Myocardial infarction was produced by left circumflex coronary artery ligation in swine. Studies were performed in 20 normal animals, 14 animals with compensated LVR, and 9 animals with CHF. Phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP was determined with 31P NMR and deoxymyoglobin (Mb-delta) with 1H NMR in myocardium remote from the infarct. Basal PCr/ATP tended to be decreased in postinfarct hearts, and this was significant in animals with CHF. Infusion of dobutamine (20 microg x kg-1 x min-1 IV) caused doubling of the rate-pressure product in both normal and LVR hearts and resulted in comparable significant decreases of PCr/ATP in both groups. This decrease in PCr/ATP was not associated with detectable Mb-delta. In CHF hearts, rate-pressure product increased only 40% in response to dobutamine; this attenuated response also was not associated with detectable Mb-delta. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the decrease of PCr/ATP during dobutamine infusion is not the result of insufficient myocardial oxygen availability. Furthermore, in CHF hearts, the low basal PCr/ATP and the attenuated response to dobutamine occurred in the absence of myocardial hypoxia, indicating that the HEP and contractile abnormalities were not the result of insufficient oxygen availability.  (+info)

(7/9164) Hemodialysis with high-calcium dialysate impairs cardiac relaxation.

BACKGROUND: During hemodialysis (HD), serum ionized calcium is directly related to the dialysate calcium concentration. We have recently shown an acute induction of hypercalcemia to impair left ventricular (LV) relaxation. In the current study we sought to establish whether changes in serum Ca++ also affect LV function during HD. METHODS: We echocardiographically examined the LV relaxation and systolic function of 12 patients with end-stage renal disease before and after three HD treatments with dialysate Ca++ concentrations of 1.25 mmol/liter (dCa++1.25), 1.5 mmol/liter (dCa++1.50), and 1.75 mmol/liter (dCa++1.75), respectively. Age- and sex-matched healthy controls were also examined echocardiographically. RESULTS: The LV posterior wall thickness and the interventricular septum thickness, and the LV end-diastolic dimension and the end-systolic dimensions were significantly greater in the patients when compared with the controls, and the LV fractional shortening, the ratio of peak early to peak late diastolic velocities (E/Amax), and the isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT) showed impairment of LV relaxation and systolic function in the patients. Serum ionized calcium increased significantly during the dCa++1.5 HD (1.24 +/- 0.10 vs. 1.34 +/- 0.06 mmol/liter, P = 0. 004) and dCa++1.75 HD (1.19 +/- 0.10 vs. 1.47 +/- 0.06 mmol/liter, P = 0.002), and plasma intact parathyroid hormone decreased significantly during the dCa++1.75 HD (medians 8.2 vs. 2.7 pmol/liter, P = 0.002). LV systolic function was not altered during any of the treatments. The changes in E/Amax and IVRT suggested impairment of relaxation during all sessions, but only during the dCa++1.75 HD was the impairment statistically significant (E/Amax 1. 153 +/- 0.437 vs. 0.943 +/- 0.352, P < 0.05; IVRT 147 +/- 29 vs. 175 +/- 50 msecond, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HD with high-calcium (dCa++1. 75 mmol/liter) dialysate impairs LV relaxation when compared with lower calcium dialysate (dCa++1.25 and dCa++1.5 mmol/liter) treatments.  (+info)

(8/9164) Simultaneous assessment of effects of coronary vasodilators on the coronary blood flow and the myocardial contractility by using the blood-perfused canine papillary muscle.

Effects of 6 coronary vasodilators on the coronary blood flow and the contractile force of the ventricular muscle were examined simultaneously by injecting these drugs to the arterially blood-perfused canine papillary muscle preparation. All compounds produced a dose-dependent increase in blood flow rate, and relative potencies determined on the basis of doses producing a 100% increase in blood flow rate, ED100, were in the descending order : nifedipine greater than verapamil greater than diltiazem greater than dilazep greater than dipyridamole greater than carbochromen, and approximately 1 : 1/12 : 1/26 : 1/100 : 1/300 : 1/500. All drugs except for dipyridamole caused a dose-dependent decrease in the developed tension of the papillary muscle, although nifedipine and diltiazem in low doses produced a slight increase. Relative potencies determined on the basis of doses producing a 50% decrease in developed tension, ID50, were as follows: nifedipine (1), verapamil (1/13), diltiazem (1/40), dilazep (1/100), and carbochromen (1/270). Ratios of the ID50 to ED100 were as follows: diltiazem (5.2), nifedipine (3.5), verapamil (3.5), dilazep (2.5), and carbochromen (1.8). The higher the value the more predominant on the coronary vascular bed or the less depressant on the myocardial contractility were their actions.  (+info)