(1/1401) Candidate noninfectious disease conditions.

Important micronutrient deficiencies in at-risk populations can be addressed simultaneously with programmatically cost-effective results. Because of the interaction between many micronutrients, this would also be biologically effective. With adequate investment and political support, the chances of eliminating iodine deficiency as a problem in women of reproductive age and young children and of eliminating vitamin A deficiency as a problem in young children in the future are high. To eliminate iron deficiency and folic-acid-dependent neural tube defects (FADNTDs) in low-income populations, a new set of approaches will have to be developed. These same approaches, if successful, could be used to tackle other important micronutrient deficiencies.  (+info)

(2/1401) Effect of iron-, iodine-, and beta-carotene-fortified biscuits on the micronutrient status of primary school children: a randomized controlled trial.

BACKGROUND: Deficiencies of iron, iodine, and vitamin A are prevalent worldwide and can affect the mental development and learning ability of schoolchildren. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of micronutrient-fortified biscuits on the micronutrient status of primary school children. DESIGN: Micronutrient status was assessed in 115 children aged 6-11 y before and after consumption of biscuits (fortified with iron, iodine, and beta-carotene) for 43 wk over a 12-mo period and was compared with that in a control group (n = 113) who consumed nonfortified biscuits. Cognitive function, growth, and morbidity were assessed as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: There was a significant between-group treatment effect on serum retinol, serum ferritin, serum iron, transferrin saturation, and urinary iodine (P <0.0001) and in hemoglobin and hematocrit (P <0.05). The prevalence of low serum retinol concentrations (<0.70 micromol/L) decreased from 39.1% to 12.2%, of low serum ferritin concentrations (<20 microg/L) from 27.8% to 13.9%, of anemia (hemoglobin <120 g/L) from 29.6% to 15.6%, and of low urinary iodine concentrations (<100 microg/L) from 97.5% to 5.4%. There was a significant between-group treatment effect (P <0.05) in cognitive function with the digit span forward task (short-term memory). Fewer school days were missed in the intervention than in the control group because of respiratory- (P = 0.097) and diarrhea-related (P = 0.013) illnesses. The intervention had no effect on anthropometric status [corrected]. CONCLUSIONS: Fortified biscuits resulted in a significant improvement in the micronutrient status of primary school children from a poor rural community and also appeared to have a favorable effect on morbidity and cognitive function [corrected].  (+info)

(3/1401) Enteral nutritional supplementation with key nutrients in patients with critical illness and cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials comparing enteral nutritional support supplemented with key nutrients versus standard enteral nutritional support to determine effects on morbidity and mortality rates and hospital stay. BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have shown that malnutrition occurs in up to 30% of patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery, resulting in an increased risk of postoperative complications and death. With the realization that key nutrients can modulate inflammatory, metabolic, and immune processes, enteral nutritional regimens (supplemented with large amounts of key nutrients) have been developed for clinical use. METHODS: Eleven prospective, randomized controlled trials evaluating 1009 patients treated with combinations of key nutrients (Impact, Immun-Aid) were evaluated. Outcome measures examined were the incidences of pneumonia, infectious complications, and death, and length of hospital stay. Meta-analyses were undertaken to obtain the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for incidences of infectious complications, pneumonia, and death, and the weighted mean difference and 95% confidence interval for length of hospital stay. RESULTS: The provision of nutritional support supplemented with key nutrients to patients with critical illness resulted in a decrease in infectious complications when compared with patients receiving standard nutritional support and a significant reduction in overall hospital stay. Similar results were documented in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. However, there were no differences between patient groups for either pneumonia or death. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis has demonstrated that nutritional support supplemented with key nutrients results in a significant reduction in the risk of developing infectious complications and reduces the overall hospital stay in patients with critical illness and in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. However, there is no effect on death. These data have important implications for the management of such patients.  (+info)

(4/1401) The effect of folic acid fortification on plasma folate and total homocysteine concentrations.

BACKGROUND: In 1996, the Food and Drug Administration issued a regulation requiring all enriched grain products to be fortified with folic acid to reduce the risk of neural-tube defects in newborns. Fortification (140 microg per 100 g) began in 1996, and the process was essentially complete by mid-1997. METHODS: To assess the effect of folic acid fortification on folate status, we measured plasma folate and total homocysteine concentrations (a sensitive marker of folate status) using blood samples from the fifth examination (January 1991 to December 1994) of the Framingham Offspring Study cohort for baseline values and the sixth examination (January 1995 to August 1998) for follow-up values. We divided the cohort into two groups on the basis of the date of their follow-up examination: the study group consisted of 350 subjects who were seen after fortification (September 1997 to March 1998), and the control group consisted of 756 subjects who were seen before fortification (January 1995 to September 1996). RESULTS: Among the subjects in the study group who did not use vitamin supplements, the mean folate concentrations increased from 4.6 to 10.0 ng per milliliter (11 to 23 nmol per liter) (P<0.001) from the baseline visit to the follow-up visit, and the prevalence of low folate concentrations (<3 ng per milliliter [7 nmol per liter]) decreased from 22.0 to 1.7 percent (P< 0.001). The mean total homocysteine concentration decreased from 10.1 to 9.4 micromol per liter during this period (P<0.001), and the prevalence of high homocysteine concentrations (>13 micromol per liter) decreased from 18.7 to 9.8 percent (P<0.001). In the control group, there were no statistically significant changes in concentrations of folate or homocysteine. CONCLUSIONS: The fortification of enriched grain products with folic acid was associated with a substantial improvement in folate status in a population of middle-aged and older adults.  (+info)

(5/1401) Estimated folate intakes: data updated to reflect food fortification, increased bioavailability, and dietary supplement use.

BACKGROUND: There is a critical need to estimate dietary folate intakes for nutrition monitoring and food safety evaluations, but available intake data are seriously limited by several factors. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to update 2 national food consumption surveys to reflect folate intakes as a result of the recently initiated food fortification program and to correct folate intakes for the apparently higher bioavailability of synthetic folic acid (SFA; ie, folate added to foods or from dietary supplements) than of naturally occurring folate so as to express intakes as dietary folate equivalents. DESIGN: It was not possible to chemically analyze foods, so adjustments were made to food-composition data by using information about food ingredients and characteristics. Total folate intakes were estimated for several sex and age groups by using the modified data coupled with dietary supplement use. RESULTS: Within the limitations of the data, our findings suggested that 67-95% of the population met or surpassed the new estimated average requirement, depending on the sex and age group and survey. Nonetheless, some subgroups had estimated intakes below these standards. Estimated SFA intakes suggested that approximately 15-25% of children aged 1-8 y, depending on the survey, had intakes above the newly established tolerable upper intake level. We estimated that 68-87% of females of childbearing age had SFA intakes below the recommended intake of 400 microgram/d, depending on the age group and survey. CONCLUSION: There is a need to explore ways to improve folate intakes in targeted subgroups, including females of childbearing age, while not putting other population groups at risk of excessive intakes.  (+info)

(6/1401) Fortification with low amounts of folic acid makes a significant difference in folate status in young women: implications for the prevention of neural tube defects.

BACKGROUND: Mandatory fortification of grain products with folic acid was introduced recently in the United States, a policy expected to result in a mean additional intake of 100 microgram/d. One way of predicting the effectiveness of this measure is to determine the effect of removing a similar amount of folic acid as fortified food from the diets of young women who had been electively exposed to chronic fortification. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the effect on folate status of foods fortified with low amounts of folic acid. DESIGN: We investigated the changes in dietary intakes and in red blood cell and serum concentrations of folate in response to removing folic acid-fortified foods for 12 wk from the diets of women who reportedly consumed such foods at least once weekly (consumers). RESULTS: Consumers (n = 21) had higher total folate intakes (P = 0.002) and red blood cell folate concentrations (P = 0.023) than nonconsumers (women who consumed folic acid-fortified foods less than once weekly; n = 30). Of greater interest, a 12-wk intervention involving the exclusion of these foods resulted in a decrease in folate intake of 78 +/- 56 microgram/d (P < 0.001), which was reflected in a significant reduction in red blood cell folate concentrations (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cessation of eating folic acid-fortified foods resulted in removing 78 microgram folic acid/d from the diet. Over 12 wk this resulted in a lowering of red blood cell folate concentrations by 111 nmol/L (49 microgram/L). This magnitude of change in folate status in women can be anticipated as a result of the new US fortification legislation and is predicted to have a significant, although not optimal, effect in preventing neural tube defects.  (+info)

(7/1401) Effect of fortification on the osmolality of human milk.

AIM: To evaluate the effect of fortification on the osmolality of human milk. METHODS: The osmolality of 47 samples of human milk was determined at baseline, just after, and 24 hours after supplementation with five different human milk fortifiers (HMF) at 4 degrees C. RESULTS: Ten minutes after HMF supplementation the osmolality of human milk was significantly higher than the sum of the respective values of HMF dissolved in water and human milk, measured separately at baseline (p<0.0001), with the exception of the HMF containing only proteins. After 24 hours a further increase in osmolality was observed. Linear regression analysis showed that total dextrin content (r=0.84) was the main determinant of the increase. CONCLUSIONS: Human milk and HMF interact to induce a rapid increase in osmolality higher than would be expected from composition alone. This rise could be explained by the amylase activity of human milk, inducing hydrolysis of the dextrin content of HMF, leading to small osmotically active molecules of oligosaccharides. The high osmolality of fortified human milk should be considered in the nutritional management of preterm infants.  (+info)

(8/1401) Iron fortified follow on formula from 9 to 18 months improves iron status but not development or growth: a randomised trial.

AIMS: Iron deficiency anaemia is associated, in observational studies, with developmental disadvantage. This study tested the hypothesis that feeding iron supplemented formula from 9 to 18 months of age would improve developmental performance. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 493 healthy children aged 9 months being fed pasteurised cows' milk were recruited from three UK centres. They were randomised to: cows' milk as before, formula containing 0.9 mg/litre iron, or formula containing 1.2 mg/litre iron, until 18 months of age. Bayley mental and psychomotor developmental indices were measured at 18 months, as were growth and haematological indices. RESULTS: Children fed iron fortified formula had higher plasma ferritin concentrations, but there were no significant intergroup differences in development or growth. CONCLUSIONS: There are no developmental or growth advantages in children given iron supplemented formula, but a benefit for a minority who were anaemic, or the possibility that a benefit may emerge at a later age, cannot be excluded.  (+info)