(1/503) Risk factors for severe hemorrhagic cystitis following BMT.

Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common toxicity of preparative regimens for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Severe HC often requires prolonged and expensive hospitalization, and occasionally can result in death. To investigate the risk factors for severe HC, we conducted a retrospective study among 1908 patients who received BMTs at the University of Minnesota during 1974 to 1993. A previous report from our institution reported on 977 of these patients. We identified all patients with genitourinary complication within 100 days post-BMT from the BMT database. Medical charts for these patients were reviewed to determine whether the patient had HC and also the grade of HC. A total of 208 HC cases were identified during the study period. Of them, 92 patients had severe HC, an incidence of 5% (95% CI = 4-6%). We found that grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease (RR = 2.56; 95% CI = 1.43-4.56), use of busulfan (RR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.35-5.35), and age at transplant (RR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.27-3.81, for age of 10-30 compared to age of 0-9) were related to an increased risk of HC. In contrast, transplant year was inversely associated with the risk of HC (trend test, P < 0.01). We did not find any significant difference in HC with the use of prophylactic Mesna.  (+info)

(2/503) Adenovirus infection after pediatric bone marrow transplantation.

Retrospective analysis of 206 patients undergoing 215 consecutive bone marrow transplants (BMT) at St Jude Children's Research Hospital between November 1990 and December 1994 identified 6% (seven male, six female) with adenovirus infection. The affected patients had a median age of 7.9 years (range 3-24 years) at time of transplantation. Although transplants were performed for hematologic malignancies, solid tumors or nonmalignant conditions, only patients with hematologic malignancies had adenoviral infections. Adenovirus was first detected at a median of 54 days (range -4 to +333) after BMT. Adenovirus developed in eight of 69 (11.6%) patients receiving grafts from matched unrelated or mismatched related donors, in four of 52 (7.7%) receiving grafts from HLA-matched siblings, and in one of 93 (1.1%) receiving autografts. The most common manifestation of adenovirus infection was hemorrhagic cystitis, followed by gastroenteritis, pneumonitis and liver failure. The incidence of adenovirus infection in pediatric BMT patients at our institution is similar to that reported in adult patients. Using univariate analysis, use of total body irradiation and type of bone marrow graft were significant risk factors for adenovirus infection. Only use of total body irradiation remained as a factor on multiple logistic regression analysis.  (+info)

(3/503) Urinary tract infections in adults.

Urinary tract infections remain a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. Recent studies have helped to better define the population groups at risk for these infections, as well as the most cost-effective management strategies. Initially, a urinary tract infection should be categorized as complicated or uncomplicated. Further categorization of the infection by clinical syndrome and by host (i.e., acute cystitis in young women, acute pyelonephritis, catheter-related infection, infection in men, asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly) helps the physician determine the appropriate diagnostic and management strategies. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections are caused by a predictable group of susceptible organisms. These infections can be empirically treated without the need for urine cultures. The most effective therapy for an uncomplicated infection is a three-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complicated infections are diagnosed by quantitative urine cultures and require a more prolonged course of therapy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria rarely requires treatment and is not associated with increased morbidity in elderly patients.  (+info)

(4/503) Increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease, obstructive bronchiolitis, and alopecia with busulfan versus total body irradiation: long-term results of a randomized trial in allogeneic marrow recipients with leukemia. Nordic Bone Marrow Transplantation Group.

Leukemic patients receiving marrow from HLA-identical sibling donors were randomized to treatment with either busulfan 16 mg/kg (n = 88) or total body irradiation ([TBI] n = 79) in addition to cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg. The patients were observed for a period of 5 to 9 years. Busulfan-treated patients had an increased risk of veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver (12% v 1%, P =.01) and hemorrhagic cystitis (32% v 10%, P =.003). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was similar in the two groups, but the 7-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 59% in the busulfan-treated group versus 47% in the TBI group (P =.05). Death from GVHD was more common in the busulfan group (22% v 3%, P <.001). Obstructive bronchiolitis occurred in 26% of the busulfan patients but in only 5% of the TBI patients (P <.01). Complete alopecia developed in 8 busulfan patients and partial alopecia in 17, versus five with partial alopecia in the TBI group (P <.001). Cataracts occurred in 5 busulfan-treated patients and 16 TBI patients (P =.02). The incidence of relapse after 7 years was 29% in both groups. Seven-year transplant-related mortality (TRM) in patients with early disease was 21% in the busulfan group and 12% in the TBI group. In patients with more advanced disease, the corresponding figures were 64% and 22%, respectively (P =.004). Leukemia-free survival (LFS) in patients with early disease was 68% in busulfan-treated patients and 66% in TBI patients. However, 7-year LFS in patients with more advanced disease was 17% in the busulfan group versus 49% in the TBI group (P <.01). In patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in first chronic phase, 7-year LFS was 72% and 83% in the two groups, respectively.  (+info)

(5/503) Evaluation of uroprotective efficacy of amifostine against cyclophosphamide induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

The role of amifostine in the prevention of cyclophosphamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) was evaluated in the rat model. Urinary bladders from control rats that received no drugs (group I) were compared with those from rats receiving cyclophosphamide alone at a dose of 150 mg/kg (group II), and two other groups receiving amifostine at 100 mg/kg (group III) and 200 mg/kg (group IV), 15 min prior to cyclophosphamide. Bladders were assessed macroscopically and histologically at 24 h and after 7 days. All the animals that received cyclophosphamide alone developed severe HC. On the basis of the scores of macroscopic and histologic changes, animals that received amifostine showed excellent uroprotection. Only 2/6 rats in group III and 1/6 rats in group IV developed mild HC at 24 h. None of the rats in either of these groups showed any evidence of HC at 7 days. It is concluded that amifostine protects the urothelium against cyclophosphamide-induced HC.  (+info)

(6/503) A trial comparing low-dose, short-course ciprofloxacin and standard 7 day therapy with co-trimoxazole or nitrofurantoin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection.

The study was undertaken to compare the safety and efficacy of twice-daily ciprofloxacin for 3 days with standard 7 day therapy with either co-trimoxazole or nitrofurantoin in the treatment of women with acute, uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). This multicentre, prospective, randomized, double-blind trial compared oral ciprofloxacin (100 mg bd) for 3 days with co-trimoxazole (160/800 mg bd) or nitrofurantoin (100 mg bd) for 7 days. Bacteriological and clinical evaluations were performed at study entry, during therapy and 4-10 days and 4-6 weeks after the completion of therapy. The primary efficacy parameter was eradication of the causative organism 4-10 days following treatment. Of 713 women enrolled and evaluable for safety, 521 were evaluable for efficacy (168 ciprofloxacin, 174 co-trimoxazole, 179 nitrofurantoin). Escherichia coli (83%) was the most frequently isolated pathogen in all treatment groups. Bacteriological eradication was reported in 88% of ciprofloxacin patients, 93% of co-trimoxazole patients and 86% of nitrofurantoin patients. At the 4-6 week follow-up, ciprofloxacin had statistically significantly higher eradication rates (91%) than co-trimoxazole (79%; 95% confidence limit (CL) = -20.6%, -3.9%) and nitrofurantoin (82%; 95% CL = -17.1%, -0.9%). Clinical resolution 4-10 days after therapy and at the 4-6 week follow-up was similar among the three treatment groups. The overall incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was not significantly different (P = 0.093) among the three drug regimens, although co-trimoxazole was associated with a greater number of adverse events than ciprofloxacin (P < or = 0.05). Ciprofloxacin also caused fewer episodes of nausea than either of the other agents (P < or = 0.01).  (+info)

(7/503) Short-course therapy of acute cystitis: a brief review of therapeutic strategies.

Acute cystitis is one of the commonest medical problems encountered by primary care physicians. It affects more women than men (8:1), but the incidence among men is increasing. Uncomplicated cystitis by definition occurs in healthy patients with a normal urinary tract, whereas complicated cystitis implies a predisposing or underlying condition. A narrow range of aetiological agents is responsible for most uncomplicated cystitis in women (Escherichia coli in 80% of cases). Recently, however, pathogens usually associated with sexually transmitted disease have been implicated. In women with typical symptoms of acute uncomplicated cystitis, an abbreviated laboratory work-up followed by empirical therapy is recommended. Single-dose and 3 day regimens of co-trimoxazole and the quinolones are as effective as longer regimens and have a higher eradication rate than other commonly used antimicrobials. Relapse rates are slightly higher with single-dose therapy. With this success rate plus the reduced cost and improved patient compliance, these regimens have replaced traditional 5 to 14 day courses of treatment. With increasing resistance of the common urinary pathogens to amoxycillin and, now, co-trimoxazole, the quinolones are a logical choice for empirical therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections.  (+info)

(8/503) Haemorrhagic cystitis: incidence and risk factors in a transplant population using hyperhydration.

Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is the syndrome of haematuria and symptoms of lower urinary tract irritability in the absence of bacterial infection. We report a low incidence of HC (18.2%) in 681 haemopoietic stem cell transplant patients, using a prophylactic regimen of hyperhydration and forced diuresis. The incidence of grade 3-4 disease is 3.4%. There was a marked difference in incidence between allogeneic and autologous transplant populations, 24.2% vs. 3.5% (P<0.0005). Busulphan conditioning, acute GVHD, interstitial pneumonitis and use of methotrexate and cyclosporin immune suppression were associated with significantly increased incidence of HC in the allogeneic population. This may reflect the numerous factors that contribute to the greater immunosuppression and consequent increased risk for HC in allogeneic transplantation.  (+info)