(1/3820) Cloning of a novel gene specifically expressed in clonal mouse chondroprogenitor-like EC cells, ATDC5.

We cloned a full-length cDNA encoding a novel mouse protein, A-C2, by differential display method using mouse embryonic fibroblast C3H10T1/2 cells and mouse chondroprogenitor-like EC cells, ATDC5. The deduced amino acid sequence of A-C2 consisted of 106 amino acids with no significant homology to the sequences previously reported. Northern blot analysis showed two major bands of 2.1 and 1.8 kb sizes. Expression of A-C2 mRNA was exclusive to ATDC5 cells at their undifferentiated stage. None of ATDC5 cells at their differentiated stage and adult mice tissues examined expressed A-C2 gene.  (+info)

(2/3820) Inhibition of transforming growth factor beta production by nitric oxide-treated chondrocytes: implications for matrix synthesis.

OBJECTIVE: Nitric oxide (NO) is generated copiously by articular chondrocytes activated by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). If NO production is blocked, much of the IL-1beta inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis is prevented. We tested the hypothesis that this inhibitory effect of NO on proteoglycan synthesis is secondary to changes in chondrocyte transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta). METHODS: Monolayer, primary cultures of lapine articular chondrocytes and cartilage slices were studied. NO production was determined as nitrite accumulation in the medium. TGFbeta bioactivity in chondrocyte- and cartilage-conditioned medium (CM) was measured with the mink lung epithelial cell bioassay. Proteoglycan synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate into macromolecules separated from unincorporated label by gel filtration on PD-10 columns. RESULTS: IL-1beta increased active TGFbeta in chondrocyte CM by 12 hours; by 24 hours, significant increases in both active and latent TGFbeta were detectable. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMA) potentiated the increase in total TGFbeta without affecting the early TGFbeta activation. IL-1beta stimulated a NO-independent, transient increase in TGFbeta3 at 24 hours; however, TGFbeta1 was not changed. When NO synthesis was inhibited with L-NMA, IL-1beta increased CM concentrations of TGFbeta1 from 24-72 hours of culture. L-arginine (10 mM) reversed the inhibitory effect of L-NMA on NO production and blocked the increases in TGFbeta1. Anti-TGFbeta1 antibody prevented the restoration of proteoglycan synthesis by chondrocytes exposed to IL-1beta + L-NMA, confirming that NO inhibition of TGFbeta1 in IL-1beta-treated chondrocytes effected, in part, the decreased proteoglycan synthesis. Furthermore, the increase in TGFbeta and proteoglycan synthesis seen with L-NMA was reversed by the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamide. Similar results were seen with cartilage slices in organ culture. The autocrine increase in CM TGFbeta1 levels following prior exposure to TGFbeta1 was also blocked by NO. CONCLUSION: NO can modulate proteoglycan synthesis indirectly by decreasing the production of TGFbeta1 by chondrocytes exposed to IL-1beta. It prevents autocrine-stimulated increases in TGFbeta1, thus potentially diminishing the anabolic effects of this cytokine in chondrocytes.  (+info)

(3/3820) Expression of both P1 and P2 purine receptor genes by human articular chondrocytes and profile of ligand-mediated prostaglandin E2 release.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the expression and function of purine receptors in articular chondrocytes. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to screen human chondrocyte RNA for expression of P1 and P2 purine receptor subtypes. Purine-stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from chondrocytes, untreated or treated with recombinant human interleukin-1alpha (rHuIL-1alpha), was assessed by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: RT-PCR demonstrated that human articular chondrocytes transcribe messenger RNA for the P1 receptor subtypes A2a and A2b and the P2 receptor subtype P2Y2, but not for the P1 receptor subtypes A1 and A3. The P1 receptor agonists adenosine and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine did not change PGE2 release from chondrocytes. The P2Y2 agonists ATP and UTP stimulated a small release of PGE2 that was potentiated after pretreatment with rHuIL-1alpha. PGE2 release in response to ATP and UTP cotreatment was not additive, but release in response to coaddition of ATP and bradykinin (BK) or UTP and BK was additive, consistent with ATP and UTP competition for the same receptor site. The potentiation of PGE2 release in response to ATP and UTP after rHuIL-1alpha pretreatment was mimicked by phorbol myristate acetate. CONCLUSION: Human chondrocytes express both P1 and P2 purine receptor subtypes. The function of the P1 receptor subtype is not yet known, but stimulation of the P2Y2 receptor increases IL-1-mediated PGE2 release.  (+info)

(4/3820) Molecular cloning of mouse and bovine chondromodulin-II cDNAs and the growth-promoting actions of bovine recombinant protein.

We previously determined the complete primary sequence of a heparin-binding growth-promoting factor, chondromodulin-II (ChM-II), which stimulated the growth of chondrocytes and osteoblasts in culture. Bovine ChM-II was a 16-kDa basic protein with 133 amino acid residues and exhibited a significant sequence similarity to the repeats of the chicken mim-1 gene product. Here we report the nucleotide sequences of bovine and mouse ChM-II cDNAs. The cDNAs each contained an open-reading frame corresponding to the ChM-II precursor with 151 amino acid residues. The N-terminus of the precursor included a secretory signal sequence of 18 amino acids prior to the mature ChM-II sequence. Unlike MIM-1, there was no repeat structure in the precursor protein, indicating that ChM-II was encoded as a gene product distinct from MIM-1. We then expressed recombinant bovine ChM-II protein which was purified to homogeneity. The recombinant protein stimulated the growth of rabbit growth plate chondrocytes, mouse MC3T3-E1 cells and rat UMR-106 osteoblastic cells in vitro.  (+info)

(5/3820) Gene transfer of cytokine inhibitors into human synovial fibroblasts in the SCID mouse model.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of retrovirus-based gene delivery of inhibitory cytokines and cytokine inhibitors into human synovial fibroblasts in the SCID mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The MFG vector was used for gene delivery of tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor (TNFalphaR) p55, viral interleukin-10 (IL-10), and murine IL-10 into RA synovial fibroblasts. The effect on invasion of these cells into human articular cartilage and on perichondrocytic cartilage degradation was examined after 60 days of coimplantation into the SCID mouse. RESULTS: TNFalphaR p55 gene transfer showed only a limited effect on inhibition of RA synovial fibroblast invasiveness and cartilage degradation. In contrast, invasion of the RA synovial fibroblasts into the coimplanted cartilage was strongly inhibited by both viral and murine IL-10. Perichondrocytic cartilage degradation was not affected by either form of IL-10. CONCLUSION: The data show that cytokines can be successfully inserted into the genome of human RA synovial fibroblasts using a retroviral vector delivery system, and that the SCID mouse model of human RA is a valuable tool for examining the effects of gene transfer. In addition, inhibition of more than one cytokine pathway may be required to inhibit both synovial- and chondrocyte-mediated cartilage destruction in RA.  (+info)

(6/3820) Transduction mechanisms of porcine chondrocyte inorganic pyrophosphate elaboration.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate cellular signaling mechanisms that influence chondrocyte production of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), which promotes calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition. METHODS: Articular chondrocyte and cartilage cultures were stimulated with protein kinase C (PKC) activator and adenyl cyclase activator. Generation of extracellular PPi was measured. RESULTS: Adenyl cyclase activation resulted in diminished pyrophosphate generation. PKC activation stimulated pyrophosphate elaboration. CONCLUSION: Two signaling pathways, cAMP and PKC, modulate generation of extracellular pyrophosphate by cartilage and chondrocytes. They are novel targets for potentially diminishing extracellular pyrophosphate elaboration that leads to CPPD crystal deposition.  (+info)

(7/3820) COL9A3: A third locus for multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia, is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by mild short stature and early-onset osteoarthritis. The phenotypic spectrum includes the mild Ribbing type, the more severe Fairbank type, and some unclassified forms. Linkage studies have identified two loci for MED. One of these, EDM1, is on chromosome 19, in a region that contains the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene. Mutations have been identified in this gene in patients with the Ribbing type, the Fairbank type, and unclassified forms of MED. The second locus, EDM2, maps to chromosome 1, in a region spanning COL9A2. Recently, a splice-site mutation was found in COL9A2, causing skipping of exon 3 in one family with MED. Because of the exclusion of the EDM1 and EDM2 loci in some families, the existence of a third locus has been postulated. We report here one family with MED, evaluated clinically and radiologically and tested for linkage with candidate genes, including COMP, COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3. No linkage was found with COMP, COL9A1, or COL9A2, but an inheritance pattern consistent with linkage was observed with COL9A3. Mutation analysis of COL9A3 identified an A-->T transversion in the acceptor splice site of intron 2 in affected family members. The mutation led to skipping of exon 3 and an in-frame deletion of 12 amino acid residues in the COL3 domain of the alpha3(IX) chain and thus appeared to be similar to that reported for COL9A2. This is the first disease-causing mutation identified in COL9A3. Our results also show that COL9A3, located on chromosome 20, is a third locus for MED.  (+info)

(8/3820) Multilineage potential of adult human mesenchymal stem cells.

Human mesenchymal stem cells are thought to be multipotent cells, which are present in adult marrow, that can replicate as undifferentiated cells and that have the potential to differentiate to lineages of mesenchymal tissues, including bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, muscle, and marrow stroma. Cells that have the characteristics of human mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from marrow aspirates of volunteer donors. These cells displayed a stable phenotype and remained as a monolayer in vitro. These adult stem cells could be induced to differentiate exclusively into the adipocytic, chondrocytic, or osteocytic lineages. Individual stem cells were identified that, when expanded to colonies, retained their multilineage potential.  (+info)