(1/1047) Malaria prophylaxis using azithromycin: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Irian Jaya, Indonesia.

New drugs are needed for preventing drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The prophylactic efficacy of azithromycin against P. falciparum in malaria-immune Kenyans was 83%. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine the prophylactic efficacy of azithromycin against multidrug-resistant P. falciparum malaria and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax malaria in Indonesian adults with limited immunity. After radical cure therapy, 300 randomized subjects received azithromycin (148 subjects, 750-mg loading dose followed by 250 mg/d), placebo (77), or doxycycline (75, 100 mg/d). The end point was slide-proven parasitemia. There were 58 P. falciparum and 29 P. vivax prophylaxis failures over 20 weeks. Using incidence rates, the protective efficacy of azithromycin relative to placebo was 71.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.3-83.8) against P. falciparum malaria and 98.9% (95% CI, 93.1-99.9) against P. vivax malaria. Corresponding figures for doxycycline were 96.3% (95% CI, 85.4-99.6) and 98% (95% CI, 88.0-99.9), respectively. Daily azithromycin offered excellent protection against P. vivax malaria but modest protection against P. falciparum malaria.  (+info)

(2/1047) Infections associated with dental procedures in total hip arthroplasty.

Dental procedures may lead to a transient bacteraemia lasting for up to 30 minutes. Of the numerous cases of total hip arthroplasty (THA) reported which have been infected from haematogenous sources, dental procedures have been involved only infrequently. We reviewed the records of 2973 patients after THA. Of the late infections identified in 52 patients, three (6%) were strongly associated with a dental procedure. Infection was diagnosed by culture from the affected joint; Streptococcus viridans was identified in two cases and Peptostreptococcus in one. One patient had diabetes mellitus and another rheumatoid arthritis, both conditions predisposing to infection. The dental operations all lasted for more than 45 minutes and no patient received perioperative antibiotics. Infection of a THA after dental procedures is more common than has been previously suspected. Patients with systemic disease, or who are undergoing extensive procedures, should be considered for prophylactic antibiotic treatment.  (+info)

(3/1047) Liposomal amphotericin B for empirical therapy in patients with persistent fever and neutropenia. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group.

BACKGROUND: In patients with persistent fever and neutropenia, amphotericin B is administered empirically for the early treatment and prevention of clinically occult invasive fungal infections. However, breakthrough fungal infections can develop despite treatment, and amphotericin B has substantial toxicity. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial comparing liposomal amphotericin B with conventional amphotericin B as empirical antifungal therapy. RESULTS: The mean duration of therapy was 10.8 days for liposomal amphotericin B (343 patients) and 10.3 days for conventional amphotericin B (344 patients). The composite rates of successful treatment were similar (50 percent for liposomal amphotericin B and 49 percent for conventional amphotericin B) and were independent of the use of antifungal prophylaxis or colony-stimulating factors. The outcomes were similar with liposomal amphotericin B and conventional amphotericin B with respect to survival (93 percent and 90 percent, respectively), resolution of fever (58 percent and 58 percent), and discontinuation of the study drug because of toxic effects or lack of efficacy (14 percent and 19 percent). There were fewer proved breakthrough fungal infections among patients treated with liposomal amphotericin B (11 patients [3.2 percent]) than among those treated with conventional amphotericin B (27 patients [7.8 percent], P=0.009). With the liposomal preparation significantly fewer patients had infusion-related fever (17 percent vs. 44 percent), chills or rigors (18 percent vs. 54 percent), and other reactions, including hypotension, hypertension, and hypoxia. Nephrotoxic effects (defined by a serum creatinine level two times the upper limit of normal) were significantly less frequent among patients treated with liposomal amphotericin B (19 percent) than among those treated with conventional amphotericin B (34 percent, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Liposomal amphotericin B is as effective as conventional amphotericin B for empirical antifungal therapy in patients with fever and neutropenia, and it is associated with fewer breakthrough fungal infections, less infusion-related toxicity, and less nephrotoxicity.  (+info)

(4/1047) Infective endocarditis and dentistry: outcome-based research.

Antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of infective endocarditis has long been recommended for patients receiving dental care. Two studies of patients with endocarditis found limited risk associated with dental treatment. It is imperative that guidelines for therapy be based on outcome studies and on evidence of safety, efficacy and cost effectiveness.  (+info)

(5/1047) Review article: antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

This review examines the evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopan-creatography (ERCP), and provides detailed advice about suitable antibiotic regimens in appropriate high-risk patients. Ascending cholangitis and infective endocarditis are potential complications of endoscopic ERCP. The pathophysiology of these two complications is quite separate and different sub-groups of patients require prophylaxis with appropriate antibiotic regimens. Ascending cholangitis results from bacterial infection of an obstructed biliary system, usually from enteric Gram-negative microorganisms, resulting in bacteraemia. There is incomplete drainage of the biliary system after ERCP in up to 10% of patients who require stenting. Antibiotics started in these patients will probably reduce the frequency of cholangitis by 80%. If antibiotics are restricted to this group, approximately 90% of all patients having an ERCP will avoid antibiotics, but 80% of cholangitic episodes will be prevented. Infective endocarditis may result from the bacteraemia caused at the time of the ERCP in patients with an abnormal heart valve. Antibiotic prophylaxis, in particular covering alpha-haemolytic streptococci, should be started before the procedure in this defined high-risk group.  (+info)

(6/1047) Implementing a policy for pneumococcal prophylaxis in a haematology unit after splenectomy.

People who have had a splenectomy for any reason are 40 times more likely to have an overwhelming infection, especially pneumococcal infection, and 17 times more likely to suffer fatal sepsis. The incidence of such life threatening infections is reduced by prophylactic immunisation with polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine and long term antibiotic prophylaxis or instituting prompt antibiotic treatment in the event of fever. This haematology unit agreed a policy of immunisation and antibiotic prophylaxis in June 1988 for all patients undergoing elective splenectomy. The success of this policy was audited in July 1993 by a retrospective analysis of patients' case notes. Seventy four patients were identified as having had a splenectomy, 54 (73%) before June 1988, of whom only 13 (24%) had received both pneumococcal immunisation and antibiotic prophylaxis before implementation of the agreed policy. At the time of audit, 46/74 (62%) patients were recorded as having received immunisation and 64/74 (86%) as receiving antibiotic prophylaxis or a supply of antibiotics to take in the event of a fever. All but one of the 20 patients who had a splenectomy after June 1988, since implementation of the agreed policy, received immunisation and antibiotic prophylaxis. The authors conclude that establishment of a formal agreed policy for pneumococcal prophylaxis for patients undergoing splenectomy has improved the quality of care.  (+info)

(7/1047) Neutropenic infections in 100 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or Hodgkin's disease treated with high-dose BEAM chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell transplant: out-patient treatment is a viable option.

A retrospective analysis was performed on 100 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n = 75) or Hodgkin's disease (HD, n = 25) who underwent peripheral blood progenitor cell transplant (PBPCT) following high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan (BEAM) between March 1994 and June 1997. Following PBPCT and until engraftment all patients received oral ciprofloxacin and fluconazole, patients with positive Herpes simplex virus serology received acyclovir and 91 patients received filgrastim. The median days of neutropenia and days to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) >500/mm3 were 6 and 9, respectively. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 68 patients. Gram-positive bacteremia occurred in 14 patients. No gram-negative infections, invasive fungal infections, intensive care visits or deaths occurred during the period of neutropenia or in the first 30 days following transplant. In multivariate logistic regression the risk of development of any infection was associated only with the duration of neutropenia (P = 0.02) and the risk of bacteremia was associated only with the number of CD34+ cells infused (P = 0.046). Among 49 patients treated in the outpatient setting, 14 (28%) were never admitted. High-dose chemotherapy with BEAM supported by PBPCT, prophylactic antibiotics and filgrastim resulted in a low incidence of infections and no acute mortality. WBC engraftment occurred rapidly allowing for a predictable course during which lengthy hospital stays and amphotericin therapy could be avoided.  (+info)

(8/1047) Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: prevalence, incidence, and indications for antibiotic prophylaxis.

BACKGROUND: The literature on infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is virtually confined to case reports. Consequently, the risk of endocarditis in HCM remains undefined. METHODS AND RESULTS: We assessed the occurrence of endocarditis in 810 HCM patients evaluated between 1970 and 1997. Endocarditis was diagnosed in 10 patients, 2 of whom were excluded from analysis of prevalence and incidence because they were referred for acute endocarditis. At first evaluation, echocardiographic features consistent with prior endocarditis were identified in 3 of 808 patients, a prevalence of 3.7 per 1000 patients (95% CI, 0.8 to 11). Of 681 patients who were followed, 5 developed endocarditis, an incidence of 1.4 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 0.5 to 3.2); outflow obstruction was present in each of these 5 patients and was associated with the risk of endocarditis (P=0.006). In the 224 obstructive patients, incidence of endocarditis was 3.8 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.6 to 8.9) and probability of endocarditis 4. 3% at 10 years. Left atrial size was also associated with the risk of endocarditis (P=0.007). In patients with both obstruction and atrial dilatation (>/=50 mm), incidence of endocarditis increased to 9.2 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 2.5 to 23.5). Analysis of all 10 patients with endocarditis identified outflow obstruction in each and atrial dilatation in 7. CONCLUSIONS: Endocarditis in HCM is virtually confined to patients with outflow obstruction and is more common in those with both obstruction and atrial dilatation. These results indicate that antibiotic prophylaxis is required only in patients with obstructive HCM.  (+info)