(1/17) Pulsed radiofrequency of the second cervical ganglion (C2) for the treatment of cervicogenic headache.

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(2/17) A new method for induction of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia in non-inducible cases.

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(3/17) Pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulation prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats.

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(4/17) Combination therapy of radiofrequency lumbar facet joint denervation and epidural spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome.

An 81-year-old woman with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) was treated using a combination of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) lumbar zygapophysial joint denervation and epidural spinal cord stimulation (SCS). She had undergone a staged laminectomy for narrowing of the spinal canal from L1 to S1 and degenerative spondylolisthesis at the L3-4 level. Postoperatively, in addition to low back pain (LBP) induced by dynamic motion, she began to experience intractable leg pain with a burning sensation, presumably caused by damage to the cauda equina. She initially underwent RF lumbar zygapophysial joint denervation for the LBP and subsequently underwent SCS via dual electrode leads for the leg pain. This combination therapy of RF denervation and SCS relieved the LBP almost entirely and relieved the leg pain by approximately 50%. The combination of these two minimally invasive interventions is particularly effective for severe leg pain and LBP in elderly patients or medically compromised cases with contraindications against general anesthesia, as well as in patients with FBSS.  (+info)

(5/17) Pulsed radiofrequency therapy versus greater occipital nerve block in the management of refractory cervicogenic headache - a pilot study.

The aim of this pilot study was to compare the efficacy of pulsed radiofrequency to the greater occipital nerve versus a greater occipital nerve block with a mixture of local anaesthetic and steroid in the management of refractory cervicogenic headache. We enrolled 30 patients suffering from refractory cervicogenic headache. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of fifteen. A greater occipital nerve block with steroid was utilised in group A, while a pulsed radiofrequency treatment was employed in group B. Success of both procedures was evaluated by comparing pre and post intervention Visual Analogue Scale of pain, Medication Quantification Scale - III. and Global Perceived Effect at three and 9 months after the procedures. At three months post therapy a significant decrease in Visual Analogue Scale (p<0.001) was identified (3.2 points in group A, 3.3 points in group B respectively). In group B pain remained reduced even after 9 months (p<0.001) when compared to pre treatment scores. The consumption of analgesic medication was reduced significantly in both groups at three months (p<0.001) and 9 months (p<0.01), respectively. No serious complication was noted. Greater occipital nerve block is a safe, efficient technique in the management of cervicogenic headaches. Despite the lack of high quality scientific evidence (level III or IV) in the literature, we have extensive experience with steroid application and pulsed radiofrequency to the greater occipital nerve and report the beneficial results in our study.  (+info)

(6/17) Surgical treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia: comparison of the effectiveness between MVD and MVD+PSR in a series of 210 patients.

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(7/17) Cold radiofrequency plasma treatment modifies wettability and germination speed of plant seeds.

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(8/17) Radiofrequency-targeted vertebral augmentation versus traditional balloon kyphoplasty: radiographic and morphologic outcomes of an ex vivo biomechanical pilot study.

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