(1/9962) An improved method for the structural profiling of keratan sulfates: analysis of keratan sulfates from brain and ovarian tumors.

A previously developed method for the structural fingerprinting of keratan sulfates (Brown et al., Glycobiology, 5, 311-317, 1995) has been adapted for use with oligosaccharides fluorescently labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid following keratanase II digestion. The oligosaccharides are separated by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography on a Dionex AS4A-SC column. This methodology permits quantitative analysis of labeled oligosaccharides which can be detected at the sub-nanogram ( approximately 100 fmol) level. Satisfactory calibration of this method can be achieved using commercial keratan sulfate standards. Keratan sulfates from porcine brain phosphocan and human ovarian tumors have been examined using this methodology, and their structural features are discussed.  (+info)

(2/9962) Role of dexamethasone dosage in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists for prophylaxis of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

Dexamethasone (20 mg) or its equivalent in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists appears to be the gold-standard dose for antiemetic prophylaxis. Additional to concerns about the use of corticosteroids with respect to enhanced tumour growth or impaired killing of the tumour cells, there is evidence that high-dosage dexamethasone impairs the control of delayed nausea and emesis, whereas lower doses appear more beneficial. To come closer to the most adequate dose, we started a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial investigating additional dosage of 8 or 20 mg dexamethasone to tropisetron (Navoban), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in cis-platinum-containing chemotherapy. After an interim analysis of 121 courses of chemotherapy in 69 patients, we have been unable to detect major differences between both treatment alternatives. High-dose dexamethasone (20 mg) had no advantage over medium-dose dexamethasone with respect to objective and subjective parameters of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting. In relation to concerns about the use of corticosteroids in non-haematological cancer chemotherapy, we suggest that 8 mg or its equivalent should be used in combination with 5-HT3 antagonists until further research proves otherwise.  (+info)

(3/9962) Cancer risk in close relatives of women with early-onset breast cancer--a population-based incidence study.

Inherited susceptibility to breast cancer is associated with an early onset and bilateral disease. The extent of familial risks has not, however, been fully assessed in population-based incidence studies. The purpose of the study was to quantify the risks for cancers of the breast, ovary and other sites of close relatives of women in whom breast cancer was diagnosed at an early age. Records collected between 1943 and 1990 at the Danish Cancer Registry were searched, and 2860 women were found in whom breast cancer was diagnosed before age 40. Population registers and parish records were used to identify 14 973 parents, siblings and offspring of these women. Cancer occurrence through to 31 December 1993 was determined within the Cancer Registry's files and compared with national incidence rates. Women with early-onset breast cancer were at a nearly fourfold increased risk of developing a new cancer later in life (268 observed vs. 68.9 expected). The excess risk was most evident for second cancer of the breast (181 vs. 24.5) and for ovarian cancer (20 vs. 3.3). For mothers and sisters, risks for cancers of the breast and ovary were significantly increased by two- to threefold. Bilateral breast cancer and breast-ovarian cancer were very strong predictors of familial risks, with one in four female relatives predicted to develop breast and/or ovarian cancer by age 75. Mothers had a slightly increased risk of colon cancer, but not endometrial cancer. The risk for breast cancer was also increased among fathers (standardized incidence ratio 2.5; 95% CI 0.5-7.4) and especially brothers (29; 7.7-74), although based on small numbers. The risk for prostatic cancer was unremarkable. In this large population-based survey, the first-degree relatives of women who developed breast cancer before age 40 were prone to ovarian cancer as well as male and female breast cancer, but not other tumours that may share susceptibility genes with breast cancer.  (+info)

(4/9962) Frequent silencing of the GPC3 gene in ovarian cancer cell lines.

GPC3 encodes a glypican integral membrane protein and is mutated in the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, an X-linked condition, is characterized by pre- and postnatal overgrowth as well as by various other abnormalities, including increased risk of embryonal tumors. The GPC3 gene is located at Xq26, a region frequently deleted in advanced ovarian cancers. To determine whether GPC3 is a tumor suppressor in ovarian neoplasia, we studied its expression and mutational status in 13 ovarian cancer cell lines. No mutations were found in GPC3, but its expression was lost in four (31%) of the cell lines analyzed. In an of the cases where GPC3 expression was lost, the GPC3 promoter was hypermethylated, as demonstrated by Southern analysis. Expression of GPC3 was restored by treatment of the cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. A colony-forming assay confirmed that ectopic GPC3 expression inhibited the growth of ovarian cancer cell lines. Our results show that GPC3, a gene involved in the control of organ growth, is frequently inactivated in a subset of ovarian cancers and suggest that it may function as a tumor suppressor in the ovary.  (+info)

(5/9962) Survival in familial, BRCA1-associated, and BRCA2-associated epithelial ovarian cancer. United Kingdom Coordinating Committee for Cancer Research (UKCCCR) Familial Ovarian Cancer Study Group.

The natural history of hereditary and BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated epithelial ovarian cancer may differ from that of sporadic disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated hereditary ovarian cancer, hereditary ovarian cancer with no identified BRCA1/2 mutation, and ovarian cancer in population-based controls. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing was carried out on index cases from 119 families with site-specific epithelial ovarian cancer or breast-ovarian cancer. We estimated overall survival in 151 patients from 57 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation families and compared it with that in 119 patients from 62 families in which a BRCA1/2 mutation was not identified. We compared clinical outcome and data on tumor histopathology, grade, and stage. We also compared survival in familial epithelial ovarian cancer, whether or not a mutation was identified, with that of an age-matched set of population control cases. Overall survival at 5 years was 21% (95% confidence interval, 14-28) in cases from BRCA1 mutation families, 25% (8-42) in BRCA2 mutation families, and 19% (12-26) in families with no identified mutation (P = 0.91). Survival in familial ovarian cancer cases as a whole was significantly worse than for population controls (P = 0.005). In the familial cases, we found no differences in histopathological type, grade, or stage according to mutation status. Compared to population control cases, mucinous tumors occurred less frequently in the familial cases (2 versus 12%, P<0.001), and a greater proportion of the familial cases presented with advanced disease (83% stage III/IV versus 56%; P = 0.001). We have shown that survival in familial ovarian cancer cases is worse than that in sporadic cases, whether or not a BRCA1/2 mutation was identified, perhaps reflecting a difference in biology analogous to that observed in breast cancer.  (+info)

(6/9962) Survival after breast cancer in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

BACKGROUND: Studies of survival following breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers have yielded conflicting results. We undertook an analysis of a community-based study of Ashkenazi Jews to investigate the effect of three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 on survival among patients with breast or ovarian cancer. METHODS: We collected blood samples and questionnaire data from 5318 Ashkenazi Jewish volunteers. The blood samples were tested for 185delAG (two nucleotide deletion) and 5382insC (single nucleotide insertion) mutations in BRCA1 and the 6174delT (single nucleotide deletion) mutation in BRCA2. To estimate survival differences in the affected relatives according to their BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carrier status, we devised and applied a novel extension of the kin-cohort method. RESULTS: Fifty mutation carriers reported that 58 of their first-degree relatives had been diagnosed with breast cancer and 10 with ovarian cancer; 907 noncarriers reported 979 first-degree relatives with breast cancer and 116 with ovarian cancer. Kaplan-Meier estimates of median survival after breast cancer were 16 years (95% confidence interval [CI] = 11-40) in the relatives of carriers and 18 years (95% CI = 15-22) in the relatives of noncarriers, a difference that was not statistically significant (two-sided P = .87). There was also no difference in survival times among the 126 first-degree relatives with ovarian cancer. We found no survival difference between patients with breast or ovarian cancer who were inferred carriers of BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations and noncarriers. CONCLUSIONS: Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations appeared to have neither better nor worse survival prognosis.  (+info)

(7/9962) In vivo localization of [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide to human ovarian tumor xenografts induced to express the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 using an adenoviral vector.

Adenoviral vectors, encoding genes for cell surface antigens or receptors, have been used to induce their high level expression on tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. These induced antigens and receptors can then be targeted with radiolabeled antibodies or peptides for potential radiotherapeutic applications. The purpose of this study was to determine a dosing schema of an adenoviral vector encoding the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (AdCMVhSSTr2) for achieving the highest tumor localization of [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide, which binds to this receptor, in a human ovarian cancer model as a prelude to future therapy studies. AdCMVhSSTr2 was produced and used to induce hSSTr2 on A427 human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells and on SKOV3.ipl human ovarian cancer cells in vitro, as demonstrated by competitive binding assays using [125I]-Tyr1-somatostatin and [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide. Mice bearing i.p. SKOV3.ip1 tumors administered 1 x 10(9) plaque-forming units of AdCMVhSSTr2 i.p. 5 days after tumor cell inoculation, followed by an i.p. injection of [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide 2 days later, showed a range of 15.3-60.4% median injected dose/gram (ID/g) in tumor at 4 h after injection compared with 3.5% ID/g when [125I]-Tyr1-somatostatin was administered and 0.3% ID/g when the negative control peptide [125I]-mIP-bombesin was administered. Mice administered a control adenoviral vector encoding the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor did not have tumor localization of [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide (<1.6% ID/g), demonstrating specificity of [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide for the AdCMVhSSTr2 induced tumor cells. In another set of experiments, the tumor localization of [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was not different 1, 2, or 4 days after AdCMVhSSTr2 injection (31.8, 37.7, and 40.7% ID/g, respectively; P = 0.88), indicating that multiple injections of radiolabeled peptide can be administered with equivalent uptake over a 4-day period. [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide tumor localization in animals administered AdCMVhSSTr2 on consecutive days or 2 days apart was 22.4% ID/g and 53.2% ID/g, respectively (P = 0.009) when [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was given 1 day after the second AdCMVhSSTr2 injection. There was no difference in [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide localization after a single AdCMVhSSTr2 injection (40.7% ID/g) or two injections of AdCMVhSSTr2 given 1 (45.9% ID/g) or 2 (53.2% ID/g) days apart, where [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was given in each case 4 days after the first AdCMVhSSTr2 injection (P = 0.65). Therefore, two AdCMVhSSTr2 injections did not increase [(111)In]-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide tumor localization compared with one injection, which eliminates concerns about an immune response to a second dose of AdCMVhSSTr2. This will be the basis for a therapeutic protocol with multiple administrations of an octreotide analogue labeled with a therapeutic radioisotope.  (+info)

(8/9962) Combination of theanine with doxorubicin inhibits hepatic metastasis of M5076 ovarian sarcoma.

Theanine is a peculiar amino acid existing in green tea leaves, which was previously indicated to enhance the antitumor activity of doxorubicin. In the present study, the effect of combination of theanine with doxorubicin against hepatic metastasis of M5076 ovarian sarcoma was investigated. The primary tumor was significantly reduced by the combined treatment on M5076 transplanted (s.c.) mice. The liver weight of control mice increased to twice the normal level because of hepatic metastasis of M5076. In contrast, the injection of doxorubicin alone or theanine plus doxorubicin suppressed the increase in liver weight and inhibited hepatic metastasis. Moreover, the liver weights and metastasis scores demonstrated that theanine enhanced the inhibition of hepatic metastasis induced by doxorubicin. Furthermore, in vitro experiments indicated that theanine increased the intracellular concentration of doxorubicin remaining in M5076 cells. This action suggests that theanine leads the enhancement of the suppressive efficacy of doxorubicin on hepatic metastasis in vivo. Therefore, it was proved that theanine increased not only the antitumor activity on primary tumor but also the metastasis-suppressive efficacy of doxorubicin. The effect of theanine on the efficacy of antitumor agents is expected to be applicable in clinical cancer chemotherapy.  (+info)