(1/1592) Disabling injuries of the cervical spine in Argentine rugby over the last 20 years.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and risk factors of disabling injuries to the cervical spine in rugby in Argentina. METHODS: A retrospective review of all cases reported to the Medical Committee of the Argentine Rugby Union (UAR) and Rugby Amistad Foundation was carried out including a follow up by phone. Cumulative binomial distribution, chi 2 test, Fisher test, and comparison of proportions were used to analyse relative incidence and risk of injury by position and by phase of play (Epi Info 6, Version 6.04a). RESULTS: Eighteen cases of disabling injury to the cervical spine were recorded from 1977 to 1997 (0.9 cases per year). The forwards (14 cases) were more prone to disabling injury of the cervical spine than the backs (four cases) (p = 0.03). Hookers (9/18) were at highest risk of injury (p < 0.01). The most frequent cervical injuries occurred at the 4th, 5th, and 6th vertebrae. Seventeen of the injuries occurred during match play. Set scrums were responsible for most of the injuries (11/18) but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.44). The mean age of the injured players was 22. Tetraplegia was initially found in all cases. Physical rehabilitation has been limited to the proximal muscles of the upper limbs, except for two cases of complete recovery. One death, on the seventh day after injury, was reported. CONCLUSIONS: The forwards suffered a higher number of injuries than the backs and this difference was statistically significant. The chance of injury for hookers was statistically higher than for the rest of the players and it was particularly linked to scrummaging. However, the number of injuries incurred in scrums was not statistically different from the number incurred in other phases of play.  (+info)

(2/1592) Ankle arthrodesis using an anterior AO T plate.

We describe a surgical technique for ankle arthrodesis using an anterior approach to the ankle and internal fixation with an anteriorly-placed AO T plate. A total of 33 patients who had ankle arthrodeses have been followed retrospectively. Thirty-one (94%) of the ankles fused although two patients developed tibial stress fractures. Four patients had a superficial infection which did not prevent union. The surgical technique is simple, easily reproducible and gives excellent clinical results with a high rate of union.  (+info)

(3/1592) Hypoglossal nerve injury as a complication of anterior surgery to the upper cervical spine.

Injury to the hypoglossal nerve is a recognised complication after soft tissue surgery in the upper part of the anterior aspect of the neck, e.g. branchial cyst or carotid body tumour excision. However, this complication has been rarely reported following surgery of the upper cervical spine. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman with tuberculosis of C2-3. She underwent corpectomy and fusion from C2 to C5 using iliac crest bone graft, through a left anterior oblique incision. She developed hypoglossal nerve palsy in the immediate postoperative period, with dysphagia and dysarthria. It was thought to be due to traction neurapraxia with possible spontaneous recovery. At 18 months' follow-up, she had a solid fusion and tuberculosis was controlled. The hypoglossal palsy persisted, although with minimal functional disability. The only other reported case of hypoglossal lesion after anterior cervical spine surgery in the literature also failed to recover. It is concluded that hypoglossal nerve palsy following anterior cervical spine surgery is unlikely to recover spontaneously and it should be carefully identified.  (+info)

(4/1592) Acute atraumatic compartment syndrome in the leg.

The compartment syndrome is well recognised as occurring after trauma, but atraumatic acute compartment syndrome is less widely known. We report 3 cases in whom an acute compartment syndrome developed without major injury. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment by decompressive fasciotomy is of vital importance if limb function is to be preserved and complications avoided.  (+info)

(5/1592) Arthroscopy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint.

We carried out 12 arthroscopies of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint in 11 patients over a five-year period. Their mean age was 30 years (15 to 58) and the mean duration of symptoms before surgery was eight months (1 to 24). Six patients had an injury to the joint; all had swelling and tenderness with a reduced range of movement. In six patients, radiographs revealed no abnormality. Under general anaesthesia with a tourniquet the hallux is suspended by a large Chinese finger trap to distract the joint. Using a 1.9 mm 30 degree oblique arthroscope the MTP joint is inspected through dorsomedial and dorsolateral portals with a medial portal if necessary. All patients were found to have intra-articular pathology, which was treated using small instruments. The mean follow-up was 19.3 months (6 to 62) and all patients had no or minimal pain, decreased swelling and an increased range of movement of the affected joint.  (+info)

(6/1592) Congenital convex pes valgus.

Congenital convex pes valgus (congenital vertical talus) is a rare condition. We reviewed ten feet in seven patients who had had surgical correction. All had been operated on by the senior author (JF) and the same surgical technique was used throughout, incorporating transfer of the tibialis anterior to the neck of the talus. The mean age at surgery was 31 months and the mean follow-up was nine years (6 to 14). All patients completed a questionnaire and had clinical, radiological and photographic evaluation performed by an independent examiner. None had required further surgery. All but one were satisfied with the result, and had no functional limitations. They all wore normal shoes. The mean ankle dorsiflexion was 17 degrees and plantar flexion 21 degrees. The mean arc of subtalar motion was 27 degrees. All radiological parameters measured were within the normal range, although irregularity of the talonavicular joint was common. No avascular necrosis of the body of the talus was seen. We conclude that the medium-term results of this procedure are very satisfactory.  (+info)

(7/1592) Autologous versus allogeneic transfusion: patients' perceptions and experiences.

BACKGROUND: Preoperative autologous donation is one way to decrease a patient's exposure to allogeneic blood transfusion. This study was designed to determine patients' perceptions about the autologous blood donation process and their experiences with transfusion. METHODS: To assess patient perception, a questionnaire was administered a few days before surgery to patients undergoing elective cardiac and orthopedic surgery in a Canadian teaching hospital. All patients attending the preoperative autologous donation clinic during a 10-month period were eligible. A convenience sample of patients undergoing the same types of surgery who had not predonated blood were selected from preadmission clinics. Patient charts were reviewed retrospectively to assess actual transfusion practice in all cases. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients underwent cardiac surgery (40 autologous donors, 40 nondonors) and 73 underwent orthopedic surgery (38 autologous donors, 35 nondonors). Of the autologous donors, 75 (96%) attended all scheduled donation appointments, 73 (93%) said that they were "very likely" or "likely" to predonate again, and 75 (96%) said that they would recommend autologous donation to others. There was little difference in preoperative symptoms between the autologous donors and the nondonors, although the former were more likely than the latter to report that their overall health had remained the same during the month before surgery (30 [75%] v. 21 [52%] for the cardiac surgery patients and 30 [79%] v. 18 [51%] for the orthopedic surgery patients). When the autologous donors were asked what they felt their chances would have been of receiving at least one allogeneic blood transfusion had they not predonated, the median response was 80%. When they were asked what their chances were after predonating their own blood, the median response was 0%. The autologous donors were significantly less likely to receive allogeneic blood transfusions (6 [15%] for cardiac surgery and 3 [8%] for orthopedic surgery) than were the nondonors (14 [35%] for cardiac surgery and 16 [46%] for orthopaedic surgery). They were, however, more likely to receive any transfusion (autologous or allogeneic) than were the nondonors (25 [63%] v. 14 [35%] for cardiac surgery and 31 [81%] v. 16 [46%] for orthopedic surgery). INTERPRETATION: Patients who underwent preoperative autologous blood donation were positive about the experience and did not report more symptoms than patients who did not donate blood preoperatively. Autologous donors overestimated their chances of receiving allogeneic blood transfusions had they not predonated and underestimated their chances after they had predonated. They were less likely to receive allogeneic transfusions, but more likely to receive any type of transfusion, than were patients who did not predonate.  (+info)

(8/1592) Impact of the introduction of a daily trauma list on out-of-hours operating.

The British Orthopaedic Association have recommended that all hospitals should have daily, consultant-led, trauma lists. We have prospectively examined the introduction of a daily trauma list on the out-of-hours operating and the management of trauma in one district hospital. The data collected were compared with a corresponding 6-month period in 1996. It was found that the mean usage of the list was 2 h 38 min; 10% of lists were not used. There has been a significant reduction in the number of operations performed out-of-hours, and also a significant reduction in the amount of out-of-hours operating after midnight. More complex cases have also been operated on in normal working hours. The initial introduction of a daily trauma list has had a significant impact on the total amount of out-of-hours operating and has increased consultant supervision of the management of trauma, thereby increasing the quality of care for these patients.  (+info)