(41/106051) The endovascular management of blue finger syndrome.

OBJECTIVES: To review our experience of the endovascular management of upper limb embolisation secondary to an ipsilateral proximal arterial lesion. DESIGN: A retrospective study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over 3 years, 17 patients presented with blue fingers secondary to an ipsilateral proximal vascular lesion. These have been managed using transluminal angioplasty (14) and arterial stenting (five), combined with embolectomy (two) and anticoagulation (three)/anti-platelet therapy (14). RESULTS: All the patients were treated successfully. There have been no further symptomatic embolic episodes originating from any of the treated lesions, and no surgical amputations. Complications were associated with the use of brachial arteriotomy for vascular access. CONCLUSIONS: Endovascular techniques are safe and effective in the management of upper limb embolic phenomena associated with an ipsilateral proximal focal vascular lesion.  (+info)

(42/106051) Infrainguinal revascularisation in the era of vein-graft surveillance--do clinical factors influence long-term outcome?

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the variables affecting the long-term outcome of infrainguinal vein bypass grafts that have undergone postoperative surveillance. DESIGN: A retrospective analysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Details of 299 consecutive infrainguinal vein grafts performed in 275 patients from a single university hospital were collected and analysed. All grafts underwent postoperative duplex surveillance. Factors affecting patency, limb salvage and survival rates were examined. These factors were gender, diabetes, hypertension, aspirin, warfarin, ischaemic heart disease, run-off, graft type, early thrombectomy, level of anastomoses and indication for surgery. RESULTS: The 6-year primary, primary assisted and secondary patency rates were 23, 47, and 57%, respectively. Six-year limb salvage and patient survival were 68 and 45%, respectively. Primary patency was adversely influenced by the use of composite vein grafts. Early thrombectomy was the only factor that significantly influenced secondary patency. Limb salvage was worse in diabetic limbs, limbs with poor run-off and in grafts that required early thrombectomy. Postoperative survival was better in males, claudicants and in patients who took aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: Although co-morbid factors did not influence graft patency rates, diabetes did adversely effect limb salvage. This study, like others before it, confirms that aspirin significantly reduces long-term mortality in patients undergoing infrainguinal revascularisation.  (+info)

(43/106051) Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms: selecting patients for surgery.

OBJECTIVES: Mortality from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) remains high. Despite this, withholding surgery on poor-prognosis patients with RAAA may create a difficult dilemma for the surgeon. Hardman et al. identified five independent, preoperative risk factors associated with mortality and proposed a model for preoperative patient selection. The aim of this study was to test the validity of the same model in an independent series of RAAA patients. METHODS: A consecutive series of patients undergoing surgery for RAAA was analysed retrospectively by case-note review. Thirty-day operative mortality and the presence of the five risk factors: age (> 76 years), creatinine (Cr) (> 190 mumol/l), haemoglobin (Hb) (< 9 g/dl), loss of consciousness and electrocardiographic (ECG) evidence of ischaemia were recorded for each patient. RESULTS: Complete data sets existed for 69 patients (mean age: 73 years, range: 38-86 years, male to female ratio: 6:1). Operative mortality was 43%. The cumulative effect of 0, 1 and 2 risk factors on mortality was 18%, 28% and 48%, respectively. All patients with three or more risk factors died (eight patients). CONCLUSIONS: These results lend support to the validity of the model. The potential to avoid surgery in patients with little or no chance of survival would spare unnecessary suffering, reduce operative mortality and enhance use of scarce resources.  (+info)

(44/106051) Age-related outcome for peripheral thrombolysis.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age-related outcome of peripheral thrombolysis and determine for which patient group this treatment is worthwhile. DESIGN AND METHODS: A combined retrospective and prospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing thrombolysis for acute lower-limb ischaemia was made with respect to age-related outcome and other risk factors. RESULTS: One hundred and two patients underwent thrombolysis for acute limb ischaemia. In the under 60 age group there was a 40% amputation rate. Seventy-three per cent of this group smoked. In the over 80 age group, the amputation rate was 15% and only 8% were smokers. CONCLUSION: Advancing age is not an adverse risk factor for thrombolysis which appears to be safe and effective in this patient group. There is a high incidence of smoking in the younger age group (< 60 years), in whom failed thrombolysis frequently leads to amputation.  (+info)

(45/106051) Perceived health in a randomised trial of treatment for chronic venous ulceration.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in perceived health in patients during a clinical trial of treatments for venous leg ulceration. DESIGN: Randomised prospective factorial trial in patients with venous ulceration. Each patient randomised to a bandage, dressing and a drug. Perceived health assessed at entry and after 24 weeks. SETTING: Outpatient departments and patient's home. PATIENTS: Two hundred patients presenting to two vascular services in Falkirk and Edinburgh with chronic (duration > 2 months) non-healing venous ulceration. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND MAIN RESULTS: Analysis using the Nottingham Health Profile revealed that after 24 weeks there were significant improvements in all subscores (p < 0.01) with the exception of social isolation (p = 0.081). Patients with healed ulceration had improved in energy, pain, emotion, sleep and mobility compared with those whose ulceration failed to heal (p < 0.05). Patients randomised to four layer bandaging had significantly better energy (diff = 7.9, 95% CI 0.2, 15.6, p = 0.04) and mobility (diff = 4.5, 95% CI 0.0, 9.0, p = 0.046). This difference could be explained largely by the improved healing of patients randomised to this bandage system (67/97 vs. 50/103, OR = 2.37, 95% CI 1.31, 4.27). CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in perceived health were significantly greater in patients whose ulcers had completely healed. Methods of treatment which offer improved healing for patients with venous leg ulceration are likely to improve patients' perceived health status.  (+info)

(46/106051) Repair of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm is worthwhile in selected cases.

INTRODUCTION: The risks and benefits of operating on patients with ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) have not been defined. The aim of the present study is to report this unit's experience with operations performed for ruptured TAAA over a 10-year period. METHODS: Interrogation of a prospectively gathered computerised database. PATIENTS: Between 1 January 1983 and 30 June 1996, 188 consecutive patients with TAAA were operated on, of whom 23 (12%) were operated for rupture. RESULTS: There were nine survivors (40%). Patients whose preoperative systolic blood pressure remained above 100 mmHg were significantly more likely to survive (4/8 vs. 13/15, p = 0.03 by Fisher's exact test). Survival was also related to Crawford type: type I (two of three survived); II (none of six); III (two of six); and IV (five of eight). All non-type II, non-shocked patients survived operation. Survivors spent a median of 28 (range 10-66) postoperative days in hospital, of which a median of 6 (range 2-24) days were spent in the intensive care unit. Survivor morbidity comprised prolonged ventilation (> 5 days) (n = 3); tracheostomy (n = 1); and temporary haemofiltration (n = 2). No survivor developed paraplegia or required permanent dialysis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients in shock with a Crawford type II aneurysm have such a poor prognosis that intervention has to be questioned except in the most favourable of circumstances. However, patients with types I, III and IV who are not shocked on presentation can be salvaged and, where possible, should be transferred to a unit where appropriate expertise and facilities are available.  (+info)

(47/106051) Meta-analysis of the reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase type A moclobemide and brofaromine for the treatment of depression.

The reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase type A (RIMAs) are a newer group of antidepressants that have had much less impact on clinical psychopharmacology than another contemporary class of medications, the selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitors (SSRIs). The RIMAs agents are distinguished from the older monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) by their selectivity and reversibility. As a result, dietary restrictions are not required during RIMA therapy, and hypertensive crises are quite rare. In this article, we describe a series of meta-analyses of studies of the two most widely researched RIMAs, moclobemide (MOC; Aurorex) and brofaromine (BRO). Our findings confirm that both BRO and MOC are as effective as the tricyclic antidepressants, and they are better tolerated. However, BRO is not being studied at present for reasons unrelated to efficacy or side effects. MOC, which is available throughout much of the world (but not the United States), is significantly more effective than placebo and, at the least, comparable to the SSRIs in both efficacy and tolerability. For MOC, higher dosages may enhance efficacy for more severe depressions. We also found evidence that supports clinical impressions that MOC is somewhat less effective, albeit better tolerated, than older MAOIs, such as phenelzine or tranylcypromine. Little evidence has yet emerged to suggest that the RIMAs share older MAOIs' utility for treatment of depressions characterized by prominent reverse neurovegetative features. Based on available evidence, the RIMAs appear to have a limited, but useful, role in the differential therapeutics of the depressive disorders.  (+info)

(48/106051) Should prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in solid organ transplant recipients ever be discontinued?

Solid organ transplant recipients are at risk for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), but the risk of PCP beyond 1 year is poorly defined. We identified 25 cases of PCP in 1,299 patients undergoing solid organ transplantation between 1987 and 1996 at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation (4.8 cases per 1,000 person transplant-years [PTY]). Ten (36%) of 28 PCP cases (transplantation was performed before 1987 in three cases) occurred > or = 1 year after transplantation, and no patient developed PCP while receiving prophylaxis for PCP. The incidence of PCP during the first year following transplantation was eight times higher than that during subsequent years. The highest rate occurred among lung transplant recipients (22 cases per 1,000 PTY), for whom the incidence did not decline beyond the first year of transplantation. We conclude that the incidence of PCP is highest during the first year after transplantation and differs by type of solid organ transplant. Extending the duration of PCP prophylaxis beyond 1 year may be warranted for lung transplant recipients.  (+info)