(17/34) The labour pains of biochemical selenology: the history of selenoprotein biosynthesis.

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(18/34) Darwin and the scientific method.

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(19/34) J. J. Thomson goes to America.

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(20/34) Statistical methods for evolutionary trees.

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(21/34) Derivation of the correct waveform of the human electrocardiogram by Willem Einthoven, 1890-1895.

In the period 1890 to 1895, Willem Einthoven greatly improved the quality of tracings that could be directly obtained with the capillary electrometer. He then introduced an ingenious correction for the poor frequency response of these instruments, using differential equations. This method allowed him to predict the correct form of the human electrocardiogram, as subsequently revealed by the new string galvanometer that he introduced in 1902. For Einthoven, who won the Nobel Prize for the development of the electrocardiogram in 1924, one of the most rewarding aspects of the high fidelity recording of the human electrocardiogram was its validation of his earlier theoretical predictions regarding the electrical activity of the heart.  (+info)

(22/34) Chlorpyrifos exposures in Egyptian cotton field workers.

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(23/34) The Brain Prize 2011: From Microcircuit Organization to Constellations of Brain Rhythms.

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(24/34) Role of basic science in the development of new medicines: examples from the eicosanoid field.

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