(25/48) Reality = relevance? Insights from spontaneous modulations of the brain's default network when telling apart reality from fiction.

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(26/48) Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of Semitic languages identifies an Early Bronze Age origin of Semitic in the Near East.

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(27/48) The mystery of Gustave Flaubert's death: could sudden unexpected death in epilepsy be part of the context?

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(28/48) Feelings in literature.

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(29/48) Utopia documents: linking scholarly literature with research data.

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(30/48) Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books.

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(31/48) 'Compulsory creativity': rationales, recipes, and results in the placement of mandatory creative endeavour in a medical undergraduate curriculum.

Since 2004, medical students at the University of Bristol have been required as part of their core curriculum to submit creative works for assessment. This requirement, which we term, ironically, compulsory creativity, may be unique within medical education where arts-based modules are typically elective. Such courses often harness the insights of established artists and writers in the illumination of medical themes. Less commonly students are called upon to link their own creative work with clinical and other life experience. Occasions for students to develop such an interpretative voice are generally sparse but the benefits can be argued theoretically and practically. In this paper we explore the rationale for the inclusion of such opportunities, the ways in which we have woven creativity into the curriculum and the sorts of artistic outputs we have witnessed. Contextualised links to a wide range of original student works from the www.outofourheads.net website are provided, as is a range of student reflection on the creative process ranging from the bemused to the ecstatic. The paper provides a model and a guide for educationalists interested in developing artistic creativity within the medical curriculum.  (+info)

(32/48) Neurofibromatosis type 1 and the "elephant man's" disease: the confusion persists: an ethnographic study.

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