(73/106) Status and trends in poisonings in Denmark 2007-2009.

INTRODUCTION: The Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) provides information to the public and health care professionals on acute poisonings. The DPIC received 41,000 enquiries during the first three years of its existence as an open 24h telephone service. The aim of this data register study was to classify all substance exposures, to gain knowledge of the status and trends in poisonings (toxico-surveillance) and to evaluate the development in the number of contacts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Information and inquiries were continuously entered into a poison-centre database. A new classification system was established during the study to ensure that all agents were properly classified. A total of 41,139 calls were divided into 18 substance categories, each consisting of 3-11 subgroups. RESULTS: The number of contacts per year increased by 70% from 2007 to 2009. Three contacts per thousand individuals in the Danish population were registered in 2009. For all groups, except drugs of abuse, the data showed an increase in the actual number of exposures from 2008 to 2009. Pharmaceuticals represent one third of substance exposures, and analgesics constitute a third of these poisonings. A relative increase in contacts concerning household substances, plants and vitamins was observed. CONCLUSION: The classification gave detailed knowledge of the current poisoning status. Evaluation of subgroups showed a need for a larger number of subgroups to ensure a sufficient level of toxico-surveillance. Compared to other national poison centres, we predict a doubling in enquiries during the next ten years, mainly from the public.  (+info)

(74/106) Maternal exposure to household chemicals and risk of infant leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

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(75/106) Comparison of wipe materials and wetting agents for pesticide residue collection from hard surfaces.

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(76/106) Chemical suicides in automobiles--six states, 2006-2010.

During a 3-month period in 2008 in Japan, 208 persons committed suicide by mixing household chemicals and, while in a confined space, breathing in the resultant poisonous gas. The large number of similar suicides is believed to have resulted from the posting of directions for generating poisonous gas on the Internet. In addition to claiming the suicide victim, lethal gas generated by intentionally mixing household chemicals can leak from confined spaces, triggering evacuations, and exposing bystanders and first responders to injury. Chemical suicides similar to those in Japan in 2008 have been reported increasingly in the United States, with the majority occurring inside automobiles. To characterize such incidents in the United States, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) analyzed reports of chemical suicides and attempted suicides that occurred in automobiles, using 2006--2009 data from states participating in the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system and 2010 data from states participating in the new National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that, during 2006--2010, a total of 10 chemical suicide incidents were reported from six states, resulting in the deaths of nine suicide victims and injuries to four law enforcement officers. When responding to suspected chemical suicide incidents, emergency responders must take precautions to ensure both their safety and the safety of any bystanders in the immediate vicinity.  (+info)

(77/106) A community prevention model to prevent children from inhaling and ingesting harmful legal products.

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(78/106) Endocrine disruptors and asthma-associated chemicals in consumer products.

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(79/106) Hand eczema: correlation of morphologic patterns, atopy, contact sensitization and disease severity.

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(80/106) Heart rate variability in association with frequent use of household sprays and scented products in SAPALDIA.

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