(65/106) Household cleaning product-related injuries treated in US emergency departments in 1990-2006.

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(66/106) Study of Use of Products and Exposure-Related Behaviors (SUPERB): study design, methods, and demographic characteristics of cohorts.

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(67/106) Common household chemicals and the allergy risks in pre-school age children.

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(68/106) Quantitative assessment of airborne exposures generated during common cleaning tasks: a pilot study.

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(69/106) Toxic effects of the easily avoidable phthalates and parabens.

Some environmental toxins like DDT and other chlorinated compounds accumulate in the body because of their fat-soluble nature. Other compounds do not stay long in the body, but still cause toxic effects during the time they are present. For serious health problems to arise, exposure to these rapidly-clearing compounds must occur on a daily basis. Two such classes of compounds are the phthalate plasticizers and parabens, both of which are used in many personal care products, some medications, and even foods and food preservation. The phthalates are commonly found in foods and household dust. Even though they have relatively short half-lives in humans, phthalates have been associated with a number of serious health problems, including infertility, testicular dysgenesis, obesity, asthma, and allergies, as well as leiomyomas and breast cancer. Parabens, which can be dermally absorbed, are present in many cosmetic products, including antiperspirants. Their estrogenicity and tissue presence are a cause for concern regarding breast cancer. Fortunately, these compounds are relatively easy to avoid and such steps can result in dramatic reductions of urinary levels of these compounds.  (+info)

(70/106) Small dose... big poison.

BACKGROUND: It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. OBJECTIVE: This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. DISCUSSION: In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.  (+info)

(71/106) Sources of propylene glycol and glycol ethers in air at home.

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(72/106) Potential for exposure to engineered nanoparticles from nanotechnology-based consumer spray products.

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