(1/202) Low C18 to C20 fatty acid elongase activity and limited conversion of stearidonic acid, 18:4(n-3), to eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5(n-3), in a cell line from the turbot, Scophthalmus maximus.

The TF cell line, derived from a top predatory, carnivorous marine teleost, the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), is known to have a limited conversion of C18 to C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). To illuminate the underlying processes, we studied the conversions of stearidonic acid, 18:4(n-3), and its elongation product, 20:4(n-3), in TF cells and also in a cell line, AS, derived from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), by adding unlabelled (25 microM), U-14C (1 microM) or deuterated (d5; 25 microM) fatty acids. Stearidonic acid, 18:4(n-3), was metabolised to 20:5(n-3) in both cells lines, but more so in AS than in TF cells. Delta5 desaturation was more active in TF cells than in AS cells, whereas C18 to C20 elongation was much reduced in TF as compared to AS cells. Only small amounts of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6(n-3)) were produced by both cell lines, although there was significant production of 22:5(n-3) in both cultures, especially when 20:4(n-3) was supplemented. We conclude that limited elongation of C18 to C20 fatty acids rather than limited fatty acyl Delta5 desaturation accounts for the limited rate of conversion of 18:3(n-3) to 20:5(n-3) in the turbot cell line, as compared to the Atlantic salmon cell line. The results can account for the known differences in conversions of C18 to C20 PUFA by the turbot and the Atlantic salmon in vivo.  (+info)

(2/202) Natural copepods are superior to enriched artemia nauplii as feed for halibut larvae (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) in terms of survival, pigmentation and retinal morphology: relation to dietary essential fatty acids.

Replicate groups of halibut larvae were fed to d 71 post-first feeding (PFF) either the marine copepod, Eurytemora velox, or Artemia nauplii doubly enriched with the marine chromist or golden algae, Schizochytrium sp., (Algamac 2000) and a commercial oil emulsion (SuperSelco). The fatty acid compositions of eyes, brains and livers from larvae fed the two diets were measured, and indices of growth, eye migration and skin pigmentation were recorded along with histological examinations of eye and liver. The docosahexaenoic acid [22:6(n-3); DHA]/eicosapentaenoic acid [20:5(n-3); EPA] ratios in Artemia nauplii enriched with the SuperSelco and Algamac 2000 were 0.4 and 1.0, respectively. The E. velox copepods were divided into two size ranges (125-250 and 250-400 microm) with the smaller size range containing the highest level of (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA). The DHA/EPA ratios for the two size ranges of copepods were 2.0 and 0.9, respectively. The total lipids of eyes, brains and livers of larvae fed copepods had higher levels of DHA and lower levels of EPA than those of larvae fed enriched Artemia. The percentage of survival of the halibut larvae was significantly higher when copepods rather than enriched Artemia nauplii were fed, but larval specific growth rates did not differ. The indices of eye migration were high and not significantly different in larvae fed the two diets, but the percentage of larvae undergoing successful metamorphosis (complete eye migration and dorsal pigmentation) was higher in larvae fed copepods (40%) than in larvae fed enriched Artemia (4%). The rod/cone ratios in histological sections of the retina were 2.5 +/- 0.7 in larvae fed copepods and 1.3 +/- 0.6 in larvae fed enriched Artemia (P < 0.01). Histological examination of the livers and intestines of the larvae were consistent with better assimilation of lipid from copepods than lipid from Artemia nauplii up to 46 d post-first feeding. Thus, marine copepods are superior to enriched Artemia as food for halibut larvae in terms of survival, eye development and pigmentation, and this superiority can be related to the level of DHA in the feed.  (+info)

(3/202) Transmission of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) to yolk-sac larvae of the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus: occurrence of nodavirus in various organs and a possible route of infection.

The susceptibility of the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus yolk-sac larvae to viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) was investigated by waterborne challenge experiments with nodavirus. Transfer of VER was indicated by several lines of evidence. A significantly higher cumulative mortality was observed after challenge with virus compared to mock challenge, and increasing doses of virus resulted in shorter incubation periods. When the challenge was performed on the day after hatching, the time from inoculation to the time when 50% of the larvae were dead (LT50) ranged from 26 to 32 d. Postponement of challenge for 13 d reduced the LT50 to 14 d, indicating that the susceptibility of the larvae to the present nodavirus strain was low during the first 2 wk after hatching. The progression of the infection was monitored by sequential immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. On Day 18 after hatching the initial signs of infection were observed as a prominent focus of immunolabelling in the caudal part of the brain stem. In the same larvae immunolabelled single cell lesions were observed in the stratified epithelium of the cranial part of the intestine. The portal of entry into the larvae may thus have been the intestinal epithelium, while the route of infection to the CNS may have been axonal transport to the brain stem through cranial nerves such as the vagus nerves. Later in the infection, lesions became more severe and widespread and were also found throughout the brain and spinal cord and in the retina, cranial ganglia, intestine, liver, olfactory epithelium, yolk-sac epithelium, gills and pectoral fins. The mortality in all virus-challenged groups was 100%. This study thus demonstrates that the present nodavirus strain is able to replicate and cause VER in Atlantic halibut yolk-sac larvae at temperatures as low as 6 degrees C.  (+info)

(4/202) Arthrobacter rhombi sp. nov., isolated from Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides).

Two strains of a hitherto undescribed Gram-positive coryneform bacterium isolated from Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) were characterized by phenotypic and molecular taxonomic methods. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies demonstrated that the unknown strains constitute a new line within the genus Arthrobacter. The nearest relatives of the bacterium from fish were members of the Arthrobacter nicotianael Arthrobacter sulfureus group. The unknown bacterium was readily distinguished from these species by phenotypic methods. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as Arthrobacter rhombi sp. nov. The type strain of Arthrobacter rhombi is CCUG 38813T.  (+info)

(5/202) Epizoic amoebae from the gills of turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

Species of amoebae belonging to the genera Platyamoeba Page, 1969, Vannella Bovee, 1965 and Flabellula Schaeffer, 1926 were found to accompany Paramoeba sp., the agent of amoebic gill disease (AGD), in clinically diseased turbots. The same community of epizoic gymnamoebae was found on the gills of turbots which revealed no gill abnormalities but slight behavioral signs indicative of suboptimal health status. The assemblage of the above-mentioned free-living amoebae capable of colonizing gill tissue of turbots was supplemented with species recognized in samples fixed from primary isolates for transmission electron microscopy. The pathogenic potential of epizoic gill amoebae in turbots is discussed.  (+info)

(6/202) Experimental susceptibility of turbot Scophthalmus maximus to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus isolated from cultivated turbot.

Juvenile pathogen-free turbot were infected with a viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolate recovered from turbot cultivated on the island of Gigha, West Scotland. Mortality of 100% was recorded in fish infected via the intra-peritoneal (i.p.) route. Horizontal transmission of VHSV in sea water was demonstrated by cohabitation of naive fish with i.p. infected fish at a ratio of 1:1. The total cumulative average mortality in cohabiting fish was 60% by 60 d post-infection. Turbot infected via an immersion route exhibited a cumulative average mortality of 71% by the end of the experiment. VHSV identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was recovered from both organ (kidney and spleen) and brain samples of individual fish that died following infection by all experimental routes. These findings pose significant implications regarding the persistence of VHSV and its role in limiting natural populations of marine fish species. In addition, the establishment of infection models for the transmission of VHSV in sea water is of fundamental importance to the development of anti-VHSV vaccines in important commercial species such as turbot.  (+info)

(7/202) Pathogenicity of nodavirus strains from striped jack Pseudocaranx dentex and Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus, studied by waterborne challenge of yolk-sac larvae of both teleost species.

The present study shows that differences in pathogenicity exist among fish nodavirus strains. In challenge trials, a Japanese strain (SJ93Nag) was highly virulent to larvae of the striped jack Pseudocaranx dentex but replication was not detected in larvae of Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus at 6 degrees C. Conversely, a Norwegian nodavirus strain (AH95NorA) that was highly virulent to the Atlantic halibut larvae did not replicate in striped jack larvae at 20 degrees C. Occurrence of the disease viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) and cumulative mortality were significantly different in the 2 species when challenged with the 2 nodavirus strains. The presence of nodavirus in nervous tissue was monitored by immunohistochemical methods. Our results support the view that the genetic diversity among nodavirus strains reflects the existence of different viral phenotypes which may be adapted to infect different host species and/or for replicating at different temperatures. Fish nodaviruses represent surveyable pathogens well suited for studying the relation between viral genotypic and phenotypic properties such as host specificity, temperature optima, neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence.  (+info)

(8/202) Characterization of the capsid protein gene from a nodavirus strain affecting the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus and design of an optimal reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection assay.

A 1349 nucleotide fragment of the RNA2 from a nodavirus affecting Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus was characterised and the nuclotide sequence (accession no. AJ245641) was employed to develop an optimal reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection assay. The sequenced part of the RNA2 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus (strain AH95NorA) was highly similar in organisation to that of the RNA2 of striped jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV), and comprised features common to all nodaviruses. These characteristics confirmed that the virus that causes viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER) in Atlantic halibut is a nodavirus. The nucleotide sequence of the 1349 nucleotide fragment of Atlantic halibut nodavirus RNA2 was 80% identical to the RNA2 of SJNNV. The T2 region (830 nucleotides) of the RNA2 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus shared 98% of the nucleotide sequence when compared with the homologous region of barfin flounder nervous necrosis virus (BFNNV), while the nucleotide sequence identity to SJNNV in this region was 76%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the T4 region (421 nucleotides) of Atlantic halibut nodavirus and of other fish nodaviruses revealed a close relationship to the nodaviruses of the barfin flounder clad that have been found in other cold-water species (Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus and barfin founder Verasper moseri). The nucleotide sequence of the RNA2 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus included some features that differ from that of SJNNV. The ORF of the RNA2 of Atlantic halibut nodavirus lacked 6 nucleotides through a single deletion and a 5-nucleotide deletion, separated by 4 nucleotides. The 3'-non-encoding region contained a 21 nucleotide insert and a 3 nucleotide deletion when compared with SJNNV. In comparison with the RNA2 of SJNNV, the 3'-non-encoding region showed a nucleotide sequence identity of 84.5%. A primer set based on the Atlantic halibut nodavirus nucleotide sequence was employed in order to design an optimal RT-PCR. The detection limit of the PCR was 10 to 100 copies of plasmid, while the detection limit of the RT-PCR assay was 100 to 1000 copies of in vitro transcribed viral RNA.  (+info)