(1/105) The comparative importance of books: clinical psychology in the health sciences library.

Clinical psychology has received little attention as a subject in health sciences library collections. This study seeks to demonstrate the relative importance of the monographic literature to clinical psychology through the examination of citations in graduate student theses and dissertations at the Fordham Health Sciences Library, Wright State University. Dissertations and theses were sampled randomly; citations were classified by format, counted, and subjected to statistical analysis. Books and book chapters together account for 35% of the citations in clinical psychology dissertations, 25% in nursing theses, and 8% in biomedical sciences theses and dissertations. Analysis of variance indicates that the citations in dissertations and theses in the three areas differ significantly (F = 162.2 with 2 and 253 degrees of freedom, P = 0.0001). Dissertations and theses in biomedical sciences and nursing theses both cite significantly more journals per book than the dissertations in clinical psychology. These results support the hypothesis that users of clinical psychology literature rely more heavily on books than many other users of a health sciences library. Problems with using citation analyses in a single subject to determine a serials to monographs ratio for a health sciences library are pointed out.  (+info)

(2/105) Selected list of books and journals for the small medical library.

This revised list of 446 books and 137 journals is intended as a selection guide for small or medium-sized hospital libraries or for the small medical library serving a specified clientele. Books and journals are categorized by subject, with the books being followed by an author index and the journals by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase by smaller libraries are indicated by an asterisk. To purchase the entire collection of books and to pay for annual subscriptions to all the journals would require an expenditure for about $14,500. The cost of only the asterisked items recommended for first purchase totals approximately $4,100.  (+info)

(3/105) Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals for the small medical library.

After thirty-six years of biennial updates, the authors take great pride in being able to publish the nineteenth version (2001) of the "Brandon/Hill Selected List of Print Books and Journals for the Small Medical Library." This list of 630 books and 143 journals is intended as a selection guide for health sciences libraries or similar facilities. It can also function as a core collection for a library consortium. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals, by an alphabetical title listing. Due to continuing requests from librarians, a "minimal core list" consisting of 81 titles has been pulled out from the 217 asterisked (*) initial-purchase books and marked with daggers (dagger *) before the asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of 630 books and to pay for 143 2001 journal subscriptions would require $124,000. The cost of only the asterisked items, books and journals, totals $55,000. The "minimal core list" book collection costs approximately $14,300.  (+info)

(4/105) Study of the Information Dissemination Service--Health Sciences Library, State University of New York at Buffalo.

The Information Dissemination Service at the Health Sciences Library, State University of New York at Buffalo, was established June 1970 through a three-year grant from the Lakes Area Regional Medical Program, Inc. Analysis of two samples of user request forms yielded results which significantly substantiate findings in prior biomedical literature utilization studies. The findings demonstrate comparable utilization patterns by user group, age of material, journal titles, language, time to process request, source of reference, and size of institution.  (+info)

(5/105) Resource selection for an interdisciplinary field: a methodology.

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland developed and implemented a methodology to evaluate print and digital resources for social work. Although this methodology was devised for the interdisciplinary field of social work, the authors believe it may lend itself to resource selection in other interdisciplinary fields. The methodology was developed in response to the results of two separate surveys conducted in late 1999, which indicated improvement was needed in the library's graduate-level social work collections. Library liaisons evaluated the print collection by identifying forty-five locally relevant Library of Congress subject headings and then using these subjects or synonymous terms to compare the library's titles to collections of peer institutions, publisher catalogs, and Amazon.com. The collection also was compared to social work association bibliographies, ISI Journal Citation Reports, and major social work citation databases. An approval plan for social work books was set up to assist in identifying newly published titles. The library acquired new print and digital social work resources as a result of the evaluation, thus improving both print and digital collections for its social work constituents. Visibility of digital resources was increased by cataloging individual titles in aggregated electronic journal packages and listing each title on the library Web page.  (+info)

(6/105) FROM THE LIBRARY OF THE WILLIAM HEBERDENS.

Several books and documents from the personal library of William Heberden, Sr., and his son, William Heberden, Jr., have been given to the Countway Library through a direct descendant. One of the most interesting items is the senior Heberden's desk copy of his own Commentaries on the History and Cure of Disease, prepared in Latin and assembled by the printer with interleaves for revision. In addition, and English translation of his masterpiece, medical books from his private library, personal documents, and a number of letters are included. The decision for disposition, based upon several factors, was difficult to reach, since at least four libraries in the United States have a substantial collection of Heberden's works and the items could have been properly placed in any one.  (+info)

(7/105) Information gathering over time by breast cancer patients.

BACKGROUND: Unlike many patients of the past, today's health-care users want to become more informed about their illnesses, and they want the most current information. The Internet has become a popular way to access current information, and since its introduction more people are turning to it to find medical information. Studies report that anywhere from 36% to 55% of the American population that use the Internet is using the Internet to research medical information, and these percentages have been rising. Cancer is 1 of the top 2 diseases about which people seek information on the Internet. Some studies have specifically asked whether breast cancer patients access the Internet for medical information; estimates range from 10% to 43% of breast cancer patients who use the Internet, with higher usage being associated with more education, greater income, and younger age. OBJECTIVE: To identify where breast cancer patients find medical information about their illness and to track changes over time, from active treatment to survivorship status. METHODS: Participants were 224 women who had been recently diagnosed with Stage I, Stage II, or Stage III breast cancer. Each woman was contacted approximately 8 months and 16 months after diagnosis and was asked about 10 different information sources they could have used to obtain information or support about their breast cancer. RESULTS: Eight months after diagnosis, the top 3 information sources used by women were books (64%), the Internet (49%), and videos (41%). However, at follow-up (16 months after diagnosis), the most frequently cited information source was the Internet (40%), followed by books (33%), and the American Cancer Society (17%). We found that women continued to use the Internet as a means of gathering information even after their treatment ended. Significant unique predictors of Internet use were more years of formal education and younger ages. Cancer stage was not a significant predictor of Internet use. CONCLUSIONS: Previous research has been mixed about the percentage of cancer patients who use the Internet to gather information about their illnesses. The results of the present study corroborate 2 other data sets of breast cancer patients, as just over 44% of the women reported using the Internet after diagnosis. Sixteen months after diagnosis, the percentage of women using the Internet dropped slightly, but other chief sources dropped sharply at that time. The Internet continues to play an important role for cancer survivors after medical treatment has ended, and health professionals can use this knowledge to provide their patients with Internet advice.  (+info)

(8/105) Selected list of books and journals in allied health.

This list of 396 books and 77 journals is intended as a selection guide to be used in a library supporting allied health educational programs or allied health personnel in either an academic or health care setting. Due to the necessity of limiting the scope of coverage because of the large number and wide range of allied health professions and occupations, the recommended publications are focused primarily on the twenty-eight programs accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, plus physical therapy, dental allied health, medical secretarial, nutrition, and speech pathology/audiology. Books and journals are categorized by subject; the book list is followed by an author/editor index, and the subject list of journals is followed by an alphabetical title listing. Items suggested for initial purchase (194 books and 31 journals) are indicated by asterisks. To purchase the entire collection of books and journals (1992 subscriptions) would require an expenditure of about $22,800. The cost of only the asterisked items totals $10,850.  (+info)