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(1/6999) Ambiguity of the thymidine index.

The observed thymidine indices of seven experimental tumor lines are compared as a function of duration of emulsion exposure. The effects of dose level of tritiated thymidine and background threshold are also evaluated. The results indicate that an arbitrary high background threshold discriminates against "lightly" labeled cells at short periods of exposure but that the chosen threshold becomes less critical with longer exposure. The observed thymidine index increases with increasing duration of emulsion exposure but appears to approach a plateau for all tumor systems. The "thymidine index curves" are significantly different for each tumor. There is an inverse relationship between the dose of tritiated thymidine and the duration of exposure required to recognize the same fraction of cells as labeled in a given tumor. Similar experimental conditions do not necessarily guarantee a valid basis for comparison of observed thymidine indices among tumors.  (+info)

(2/6999) Integrin subunit gene expression is regionally differentiated in adult brain.

Integrins are a diverse family of heterodimeric (alphabeta) adhesion receptors recently shown to be concentrated within synapses and involved in the consolidation of long-term potentiation. Whether neuronal types or anatomical systems in the adult rat brain are coded by integrin type was studied in the present experiments by mapping the relative densities of mRNAs for nine alpha and four beta subunits. Expression patterns were markedly different and in some regions complementary. General results and areas of notable labeling were as follows: alpha1-limited neuronal expression, neocortical layer V, hippocampal CA3; alpha3 and alpha5-diffuse neuronal and glial labeling, Purkinje cells, hippocampal stratum pyramidale, locus coeruleus (alpha3); alpha4- discrete limbic regions, olfactory cortical layer II, hippocampal CA2; alpha6-most prominently neuronal, neocortical subplate, endopiriform, subiculum; alpha7-discrete, all neocortical layers, hippocampal granule cells and CA3, cerebellar granule and Purkinje cells, all efferent cranial nerve nuclei; alpha8-discrete neuronal, deep cortex, hippocampal CA1, basolateral amygdala, striatum; alphaV-all cortical layers, striatum, Purkinje cells; beta4-dentate gyrus granule cells; beta5-broadly distributed, neocortex, medial amygdala, cerebellar granule and Purkinje cells, efferent cranial nerve nuclei; alpha2, beta2, and beta3-mRNAs not detected. These results establish that brain subfields express different balances of integrin subunits and thus different integrin receptors. Such variations will determine which matrix proteins are recognized by neurons and the types of intraneuronal signaling generated by matrix binding. They also could generate important differences in synaptic plasticity across brain systems.  (+info)

(3/6999) Activated macrophages and microglia induce dopaminergic sprouting in the injured striatum and express brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons undergo sprouting around the margins of a striatal wound. The mechanism of this periwound sprouting has been unclear. In this study, we have examined the role played by the macrophage and microglial response that follows striatal injury. Macrophages and activated microglia quickly accumulate after injury and reach their greatest numbers in the first week. Subsequently, the number of both cell types declines rapidly in the first month and thereafter more slowly. Macrophage numbers eventually cease to decline, and a sizable group of these cells remains at the wound site and forms a long-term, highly activated resident population. This population of macrophages expresses increasing amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA with time. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA is also expressed in and around the wound site. Production of this factor is by both activated microglia and, to a lesser extent, macrophages. The production of these potent dopaminergic neurotrophic factors occurs in a similar spatial distribution to sprouting dopaminergic fibers. Moreover, dopamine transporter-positive dopaminergic neurites can be seen growing toward and embracing hemosiderin-filled wound macrophages. The dopaminergic sprouting that accompanies striatal injury thus appears to result from neurotrophic factor secretion by activated macrophages and microglia at the wound site.  (+info)

(4/6999) Development and cytodifferentiation of the rabbit pars intermedia. II. Neonatal to adult.

Material from pars intermedia obtained from rabbits ranging from the second week post-partum to the adult stage, and including specimens from pregnant animals, was studied. The rate of cell division became greatly reduced early in postnatal) development. The commonest type of cell (the pars intermedia-glandular cell) becomes increasingly PAS-positive during the early stages of development. Although by 35 days differentiation of all the ACT-type cells is complete, the pars intermedia-glandular cells take as long as 53 days to mature. The epithelioid border of the hypophysial cleft persists throughout life, commonly containing dark cells. A ciliary fringe frequently appears in neonates and persists in pregnancy. Possible functions of such cilia are discussed. Throughout development the fine structure of the vasculature was studied. Secretory granules resembling those within the cells were seen in and around the blood vessels, and the mode of endocrine secretion in the pars intermedia tissue is discussed. The pars intermedia-glandular cells of the pregnant rabbits appeared hyperactive. The functional significance of the mammalian pars intermedia is discussed.  (+info)

(5/6999) Onset of nucleolar and extranucleolar transcription and expression of fibrillarin in macaque embryos developing in vitro.

Specific aims were to characterize the onset of nucleolar and extranucleolar transcription and expression of the nucleolar protein fibrillarin during preimplantation development in vitro in macaque embryos using autoradiographic and immunocytochemical techniques. Autoradiography was performed on whole embryos cultured with [3H]uridine for assessment of nucleolar (rRNA) and extranucleolar (mRNA) transcription. Expression of fibrillarin was immunocytochemically assessed in whole embryos using a primary antibody against fibrillarin and a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated secondary antibody. Extranucleolar incorporation of [3H]uridine was first detected in 2-cell embryos cultured 6-10 h with [3H]uridine. Culture with alpha-amanitin prevented incorporation of label in 2-cell embryos, and treatment with ribonuclease reduced the signal to background levels, indicating that [3H]uridine was incorporated into mRNA and not rRNA or DNA. Nucleolar incorporation of [3H]uridine was not evident in pronucleate-stage or 2- to 5-cell embryos, but it was detected in one 6-cell embryo and in all 8-cell to blastocyst-stage embryos. Fibrillarin was first expressed in some 6- to 7-cell embryos, but it was consistently expressed in all 8-cell embryos. Fibrillarin was localized to the perimeter of the nucleolar precursor bodies, forming a ring that completely encapsulated these structures. Fibrillarin was not expressed in 8- to 16-cell embryos cultured with alpha-amanitin, indicating that it is transcribed, rather than recruited, at the 8-cell stage. In conclusion, in in vitro-fertilized macaque embryos developing in vitro, extranucleolar synthesis of mRNA is initiated at the 2-cell stage while the onset of nucleolar transcription occurs at the 6- to 8-cell stage, coincident with expression of fibrillarin.  (+info)

(6/6999) The cerebral metabolic consequences of nitric oxide synthase deficiency: glucose utilization in endothelial and neuronal nitric oxide synthase null mice.

Nitric oxide has multiple physiologic roles in the CNS. Inhibiting nitric oxide synthesis might therefore alter functional activity within the brain. We used [14C]-2-deoxyglucose in vivo autoradiography to measure local CMRglc in "knockout" mice lacking the genes for either the endothelial (eNOS) or neuronal (nNOS) isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, and in the progenitor strains (SV129, C57B1/6). Glucose utilization levels did not significantly differ between nNOS and eNOS knockout mice and C57B1/6 mice in any of the 48 brain regions examined, but were relatively lower in some subcortical regions in SV129 mice.  (+info)

(7/6999) Age-related reductions in [3H]WIN 35,428 binding to the dopamine transporter in nigrostriatal and mesolimbic brain regions of the fischer 344 rat.

In the present study, we used the potent cocaine analog [3H]WIN 35, 428 to map and quantify binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT) within the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area in young (6-month-old), middle-aged (12-month-old), and aged (18- and 24-month-old) Fischer 344 rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of indirect [3H]WIN 35,428 saturation curves revealed two-site binding for all four brain regions in every age group. The percentage of binding to the high- or low-affinity sites did not differ with age or region and was approximately 50%. However, significant age-related decreases in the overall density (Bmax) of [3H]WIN 35,428-binding sites were observed in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental area. The Bmax within all brain regions declined by more than 15% every 6 months, with the Bmax in the aged (24-month-old) group being approximately half that measured in the young adult (6-month-old) group. Competition experiments indicated that nomifensine also exhibited two-site binding to the DAT in Fischer 344 rats. No consistent age-related differences in binding affinities were noted with either [3H]WIN 35,428 or nomifensine. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that functional DATs within the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic systems are down-regulated with age, without changing their affinity for ligands.  (+info)

(8/6999) Effect of diabetes and aminoguanidine therapy on renal advanced glycation end-product binding.

BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, and aminoguanidine (AG) has been shown to decrease the accumulation of AGEs in the diabetic kidney. METHODS: This study investigates changes in AGE binding associated with diabetes in the rat kidney using in vitro and in vivo autoradiographic techniques. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control and diabetic groups with and without AG treatment and were sacrificed after three weeks. Frozen kidney sections (20 microm) were incubated with [125I]-AGE-RNase or [125I]-AGE-BSA. To localize the AGE binding site, in vivo autoradiography was performed by injection of 15 microCi of [125I]-AGE-BSA into the abdominal aorta of the rat. RESULTS: Low-affinity binding sites specific for AGEs in the renal cortex (IC50 = 0.28 microm) were detected by in vitro autoradiography. There was a significant increase in [125I]-AGE binding in the diabetic kidney, which was prevented by AG treatment. Emulsion autoradiography revealed that binding was localized primarily to proximal tubules in the renal cortex. Renal AGE levels, as assessed by fluorescence or by radioimmunoassay, were increased after three weeks of diabetes. This increase was attenuated by AG therapy. CONCLUSIONS: AGE binding sites are present within the proximal tubules of the kidney and appear to be modulated by endogenous AGE levels. It remains to be determined if these binding sites represent receptors involved in clearance of AGEs or are linked to pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of diabetic nephropathy.  (+info)