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  • tear
  • An arterial dissection is a tear in the inside lining of an artery in the head or neck that supplies blood flow to the brain. (childrens.com)
  • An aortic dissection -- also referred to as dissecting aorta or dissecting aneurysm -- occurs when the inner layer of the aorta tears and blood is channeled through the tear, causing the inner and middle layers to separate. (uchospitals.edu)
  • Having an aneurysm increases the risk of rupture or an aortic dissection - a tear in the lining of the aorta, shown in the image on the right. (mayoclinic.org)
  • diagnose
  • The Center for Cerebrovascular Disorders in Children offers children and parents a collaborative group of experts that comprehensively diagnose and treat your child's cerebrovascular disease, such as arterial dissection. (childrens.com)
  • routine
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer: a suitable alternative to routine axillary dissection in multi-institutional practice when optimal technique is used. (springer.com)
  • A randomized comparison of sentinel-node biopsy with routine axillary dissection in breast cancer. (springer.com)
  • secondary
  • Cervicocephalic dissections may occur spontaneously or secondary to major or minor trauma. (medscape.com)
  • Tears in the intimal layer result in the propagation of dissection (proximally or distally) secondary to blood entering the intima-media space. (medscape.com)
  • blood
  • In the event of a suspected dissection, our physicians may recommend medications to manage blood pressure in order to prevent the dissection from worsening. (uchospitals.edu)
  • An aortic dissection is a serious condition in which the inner layer of the aorta, the large blood vessel branching off the heart, tears. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Some medications, such as beta blockers and nitroprusside (Nitropress), reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure, which can prevent the aortic dissection from worsening. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Learn
  • Through dissections, learn about the cortex, brain cells, and where the three main subdivisions of memory (working, long-term, and skill memory) take place. (sciencenetlinks.com)