No data available that match "Tamaricaceae"



No data available that match "Tamaricaceae"



(1/19) Use of tritium accelerator mass spectrometry for tree ring analysis.

Public concerns over the health effects associated with low-level and long-term exposure to tritium released from industrial point sources have generated the demand for better methods to evaluate historical tritium exposure levels for these communities. The cellulose of trees accurately reflects the tritium concentration in the source water and may contain the only historical record of tritium exposure. The tritium activity in the annual rings of a tree was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry to reconstruct historical annual averages of tritium exposure. Milligram-sized samples of the annual tree rings from a Tamarix located at the Nevada Test Site are used for validation of this methodology. The salt cedar was chosen since it had a single source of tritiated water that was well-characterized as it varied over time. The decay-corrected tritium activity of the water in which the salt cedar grew closely agrees with the organically bound tritium activity in its annual rings. This demonstrates that the milligram-sized samples used in tritium accelerator mass spectrometry are suited for reconstructing anthropogenic tritium levels in the environment.  (+info)

(2/19) The Wilhelmine W. Key 2002 Invitational Lecture. Phylogeography, haplotype trees, and invasive plant species.

The distribution of genetic variants in plant populations is strongly affected both by current patterns of microevolutionary forces, such as gene flow and selection, and by the phylogenetic history of populations and species. Understanding the interplay of shared history and current evolutionary events is particularly confounding in plants due to the reticulating nature of gene exchange between diverging lineages. Certain gene sequences provide historically ordered neutral molecular variation that can be converted to gene genealogies which trace the evolutionary relationships among haplotypes (alleles). Gene genealogies can be used to understand the evolution of specific DNA sequences and relate sequence variation to plant phenotype. For example, in a study of the RPS2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, resistant phenotypes clustered in one portion of the gene tree. The field of phylogeography examines the distribution of allele genealogies in an explicit geographical context and, when coupled with a nested clade analysis, can provide insight into historical processes such as range expansion, gene flow, and genetic drift. A phylogeographical approach offers insight into practical issues as well. Here we show how haplotype trees can address the origins of invasive plants, one of the greatest global threats to biodiversity. A study of the geographical diversity of haplotypes in invasive Phragmites populations in the United States indicates that invasiveness is due to the colonization and spread of distinct genotypes from Europe ( Saltonstall 2002). Likewise, a phylogeographical analysis of Tamarix populations indicates that hybridization events between formerly isolated species of Eurasia have produced the most common genotype of the second-worst invasive plant species in the United States.  (+info)

(3/19) Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of volatile compounds of Tamarix boveana (Tamaricaceae).

The chemical composition of the Tamarix boveana volatile oils obtained from the whole aerial part, flowers, leaves and stems by steam distillation was analysed using gas chromatograph (GC)-flame ionization detectors (FID) and GC-MS. Sixty-two components were identified. Hexadecanoic acid (18.14%), docosane (13.34%), germacrene D (7.68%), fenchyl acetate (7.34%), Benzyl benzoate (4.11%) were found to be the major components in the whole aerial parts. This composition differed according to the tested part: 2.4 Nonadienal was the main compound in the flowers (12.13%) while germacrene D was the major component in leaves (31.43%) and hexadecanoic acid in the stems (13.94%). To evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity, all volatile oils were tested against six Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi. The T. boveana volatile oils exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity against all strains tested except Pseudomonas aeruginosa but no antifungal activity was detected.  (+info)

(4/19) Drop-size soda lakes: transient microbial habitats on a salt-secreting desert tree.

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(5/19) A new ferulic acid ester and other constituents from Tamarix nilotica leaves.

Phytochemical investigation of the leaves of Tamarix nilotica (Tamaricaceae) has led to isolation of methyl ferulate 3-O-sulphate (1) for the first time from natural sources. In addition, coniferyl alcohol 4-O-sulphate (2), kaempferol 4'-methyl ether (3), tamarixetin (4) and quercetin 3-O-beta-D-glucupyranuronide (5) were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of the extract. The pentacyclic triterpenoid, 3alpha-(3'',4''-dihydroxy-trans-cinnamoyloxy)-D-friedoolean-14-en-28-oic acid (6) was isolated from the n-hexane soluble fraction of the extract. The structures of these compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analyses including 2 dimensional NMR. Compounds 3, 4 and 6 exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with IC(50) values of 35.2, 37.0 and 21.2 muM, respectively.  (+info)

(6/19) 'Candidatus Phytoplasma tamaricis', a novel taxon discovered in witches'-broom-diseased salt cedar (Tamarix chinensis Lour.).

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(7/19) Occurrence of the Tamarix Leafhopper, Opsius stactogalus Fieber (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), in Argentina.

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(8/19) Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite primers in Reaumuria soongorica (Tamaricaceae).

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