Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Parasomnias: Movements or behaviors associated with sleep, sleep stages, or partial arousals from sleep that may impair sleep maintenance. Parasomnias are generally divided into four groups: arousal disorders, sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p191)Clonazepam: An anticonvulsant used for several types of seizures, including myotonic or atonic seizures, photosensitive epilepsy, and absence seizures, although tolerance may develop. It is seldom effective in generalized tonic-clonic or partial seizures. The mechanism of action appears to involve the enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor responses.Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders: Parasomnias characterized by behavioral abnormalities that occur during the transition between wakefulness and sleep (or between sleep and wakefulness).Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Social Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Multiple System Atrophy: A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)Lewy Body Disease: A neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia, mild parkinsonism, and fluctuations in attention and alertness. The neuropsychiatric manifestations tend to precede the onset of bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY, and other extrapyramidal signs. DELUSIONS and visual HALLUCINATIONS are relatively frequent in this condition. Histologic examination reveals LEWY BODIES in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and BRAIN STEM. SENILE PLAQUES and other pathologic features characteristic of ALZHEIMER DISEASE may also be present. (From Neurology 1997;48:376-380; Neurology 1996;47:1113-1124)Olfaction Disorders: Loss of or impaired ability to smell. This may be caused by OLFACTORY NERVE DISEASES; PARANASAL SINUS DISEASES; viral RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; SMOKING; and other conditions.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Social Dominance: Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Pair Bond: In animals, the social relationship established between a male and female for reproduction. It may include raising of young.Aversive Therapy: A treatment that suppresses undesirable behavior by simultaneously exposing the subject to unpleasant consequences.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Acetogenins: Polyketides of up to a few dozen carbons in length, formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES and oxygenated to form tetrahydrofuran and lactone rings along the length of the chain. They are found in ANNONACEAE and other PLANTS. Related compounds cyclize to MACROLIDES.Grooming: An animal's cleaning and caring for the body surface. This includes preening, the cleaning and oiling of feathers with the bill or of hair with the tongue.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Agonistic Behavior: Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Autonomic Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Hierarchy, Social: Social rank-order established by certain behavioral patterns.Oxytocin: A nonapeptide hormone released from the neurohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, POSTERIOR). It differs from VASOPRESSIN by two amino acids at residues 3 and 8. Oxytocin acts on SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, such as causing UTERINE CONTRACTIONS and MILK EJECTION.Arvicolinae: A subfamily of MURIDAE found nearly world-wide and consisting of about 20 genera. Voles, lemmings, and muskrats are members.Starlings: The family Sturnidae, in the order PASSERIFORMES. The starling family also includes mynahs and oxpeckers.Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic: Dyssomnias (i.e., insomnias or hypersomnias) associated with dysfunction of internal sleep mechanisms or secondary to a sleep-related medical disorder (e.g., sleep apnea, post-traumatic sleep disorders, etc.). (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)REM Sleep Parasomnias: Abnormal behavioral or physiologic events that are associated with REM sleep, including REM SLEEP BEHAVIOR DISORDER.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Dominance-Subordination: Relationship between individuals when one individual threatens or becomes aggressive and the other individual remains passive or attempts to escape.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Animal Communication: Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Stereotyped Behavior: Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Receptors, Oxytocin: Cell surface proteins that bind oxytocin with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Oxytocin receptors in the uterus and the mammary glands mediate the hormone's stimulation of contraction and milk ejection. The presence of oxytocin and oxytocin receptors in neurons of the brain probably reflects an additional role as a neurotransmitter.Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome: Excessive periodic leg movements during sleep that cause micro-arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. This condition induces a state of relative sleep deprivation which manifests as excessive daytime hypersomnolence. The movements are characterized by repetitive contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, extension of the toe, and intermittent flexion of the hip, knee and ankle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p387)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Vasotocin: A nonapeptide that contains the ring of OXYTOCIN and the side chain of ARG-VASOPRESSIN with the latter determining the specific recognition of hormone receptors. Vasotocin is the non-mammalian vasopressin-like hormone or antidiuretic hormone regulating water and salt metabolism.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Neurodegenerative Diseases: Hereditary and sporadic conditions which are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction. These disorders are often associated with atrophy of the affected central or peripheral nervous system structures.Role Playing: The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Restless Legs Syndrome: A disorder characterized by aching or burning sensations in the lower and rarely the upper extremities that occur prior to sleep or may awaken the patient from sleep.Parkinsonian Disorders: A group of disorders which feature impaired motor control characterized by bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; and postural instability. Parkinsonian diseases are generally divided into primary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE), secondary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY) and inherited forms. These conditions are associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic or closely related motor integration neuronal pathways in the BASAL GANGLIA.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Reinforcement, Social: The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.Social Distance: The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.GABA Modulators: Substances that do not act as agonists or antagonists but do affect the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor-ionophore complex. GABA-A receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA-A) appear to have at least three allosteric sites at which modulators act: a site at which BENZODIAZEPINES act by increasing the opening frequency of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-activated chloride channels; a site at which BARBITURATES act to prolong the duration of channel opening; and a site at which some steroids may act. GENERAL ANESTHETICS probably act at least partly by potentiating GABAergic responses, but they are not included here.Territoriality: Behavior in defense of an area against another individual or individuals primarily of the same species.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Receptors, Vasopressin: Specific molecular sites or proteins on or in cells to which VASOPRESSINS bind or interact in order to modify the function of the cells. Two types of vasopressin receptor exist, the V1 receptor in the vascular smooth muscle and the V2 receptor in the kidneys. The V1 receptor can be subdivided into V1a and V1b (formerly V3) receptors.Games, Experimental: Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Social Discrimination: Group behavior toward others by virtue of their group membership.Housing, AnimalSleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nonverbal Communication: Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.Pheromones: Chemical substances, excreted by an organism into the environment, that elicit behavioral or physiological responses from other organisms of the same species. Perception of these chemical signals may be olfactory or by contact.Mild Cognitive Impairment: A prodromal phase of cognitive decline that may precede the emergence of ALZHEIMER DISEASE and other dementias. It may include impairment of cognition, such as impairments in language, visuospatial awareness, ATTENTION and MEMORY.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Nerve Degeneration: Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways.Neuropeptides: Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Williams Syndrome: A disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, including the ELASTIN gene. Clinical manifestations include SUPRAVALVULAR AORTIC STENOSIS; MENTAL RETARDATION; elfin facies; impaired visuospatial constructive abilities; and transient HYPERCALCEMIA in infancy. The condition affects both sexes, with onset at birth or in early infancy.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Social Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Socioenvironmental Therapy: Therapy whose primary emphasis is on the physical and social structuring of the environment to promote interpersonal relationships which will be influential in reducing behavioral disturbances of patients.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Illness Behavior: Coordinate set of non-specific behavioral responses to non-psychiatric illness. These may include loss of APPETITE or LIBIDO; disinterest in ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING; or withdrawal from social interaction.Paternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Genetic Phenomena: The processes, properties and biological objects that are involved in maintaining, expressing, and transmitting from one organism to another, genetically encoded traits.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Genetics, Behavioral: The experimental study of the relationship between the genotype of an organism and its behavior. The scope includes the effects of genes on simple sensory processes to complex organization of the nervous system.Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Sublimation: A defense mechanism through which unacceptable impulses and instinctive urges are diverted into personally and socially acceptable channels; e.g., aggression may be diverted through sports activities.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Maternal Deprivation: Prolonged separation of the offspring from the mother.Maze Learning: Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Social Facilitation: Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.Reactive Attachment Disorder: Markedly disturbed and developmentally inappropriate social relatedness that begins before age 5 and is associated with grossly pathological child care. The child may persistently fail to initiate and respond to social interactions in a developmentally appropriate way (inhibited type) or there may be a pattern of diffuse attachments with nondiscriminate sociability (disinhibited type). (From DSM-V)Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Mice, Inbred C57BLPunishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)

*  neurodiversity.com | autism & biomedical concerns
as developmental disorders. http://people.sca.uqam.ca/~sqa/ ... as an autoimmune disorder, in which neuro-autoimmune factors ... lead to some of the behavioral and cellular changes also observed in ... http://kidsource.com/feingold/ADD_and_drug.html. http://autism.org/allergy.html. They are classified as developmental disorders. http://people.sca.uqam.ca/~sqa/treatment.html. http://neuroimmunedr.com/Articles/Autism___PDD/Immune_Connection/immune_con nection.html. http://autism-biomed.org. http://labouroflove.org/education/child-development/autism-is-treatable!/. Autism Research Institute. http://autism.org/. http://trainland.tripod.com/sandraj.htm. http://healing-arts.org/children/autism-overview.htm. http://autismemtl.iquebec.com/congres2/singh_eng.html. In my presentation, I will describe the role of autoimmune pathogenesis and immune therapy for autism. I have studied autism as an autoimmune disorder, in which neuro-autoimmune factors may lead to central nervous system CNS pathology. The hypothesis explo...
http://neurodiversity.com/biomedical.html
*  Narcissistic Rage and the Failure of Empathy: 'Citizen Kane'
in Shame/Narcissism Social Behavior. January 11, 2012 January 13 ... and video about The Social Networ k they felt that the fictional ... personality disorder. In my view, those two labels from ... Narcissistic Rage and the Failure of Empathy: Citizen Kane Joseph Burgo in Shame/Narcissism Social Behavior. January 11, 2012 January 13, 2012. narcissism narcissistic personality disorder narcissistic rage. Joseph Burgo + Joe is the author and the owner of AfterPsychotherapy.com, one of the leading online mental health resources on the internet. September 22, 2015 September 30, 2015. February 15, 2015 February 15, 2015. January 18, 2015 January 18, 2015. 67 comments elaine says: January 11, 2012 at 7:32 am. Reply Joseph Burgo, Ph.D. says: January 11, 2012 at 12:10 pm. Reply. Lorna Anderson says: January 18, 2012 at 6:25 pm. Lorna. Reply Joseph Burgo, Ph.D. says: January 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm. Reply Lorna Anderson says: January 19, 2012 at 5:15 pm. Lorna. Reply Joseph Burgo, Ph.D. says: January 20, 2012 at 5:41 ...
http://afterpsychotherapy.com/citizen-kane/
*  Neuropsychiatric Masquerades | Psychiatric Times
: ADHD. Bipolar Disorder. Blogs. Major Depressive Disorder ... Topics ADHD Bipolar Disorder Blogs Major Depressive Disorder ... : ADHD. Bipolar Disorder. Blogs. Major Depressive Disorder...
http://psychiatrictimes.com/articles/neuropsychiatric-masquerades?pageNumber=2
*  Title page for ETD etd-06182009-120305
Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy. Committee Chair. ... Member. Keywords social skills behavior problems ... Autism Spectrum Disorders ASD and epilepsy in an adult population ... Title page for ETD etd-06182009-120305. Title page for ETD etd-06182009-120305. Type of Document Dissertation. Author Smith, Kimberly Robin Michelle. Author's Email Address kimberlysmith15@gmail.com. URN etd-06182009-120305. Title The Assessment of and Differences among Intellectually Disabled Adults with Comorbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy. Degree Doctor of Philosophy Ph.D. Department Psychology. Advisory Committee Advisor Name Title. Johnny L. Matson. Committee Chair. Emily M. Elliott. Committee Member. Thompson E. Davis, III. Committee Member. Wm. Drew Gouvier. Committee Member. John R. Battista. Dean's Representative. Keywords social skills behavior problems psychopathology epilepsy autism intellectual disability. Date of Defense 2009-05-04. Availability unrestricted. Abstract The goal of this study was to sy...
http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd-06182009-120305/
*  Positive Effects of Methylphenidate on Social Communication and Self-Regulation in Children with Per
Methylphenidate on Social Communication and Self-Regulation in ... Developmental Disorders and Hyperactivity. Article Positive ... Methylphenidate on Social Communication and Self-Regulation in...
http://researchgate.net/publication/23218708_Positive_Effects_of_Methylphenidate_on_Social_Communication_and_Self-Regulation_in_Children_with_Pervasive_Developmental_Disorders_and_Hyperactivity
*  Current Studies | Psychiatry | Washington University
/ Adolescent Disorder Studies. Principal Investigator/ ... Early Reciprocal Social Behavior. More Information. Joan Luby...
http://psychiatry.wustl.edu/research/CurrentStudyDetails?CategoryID=46
*  Strategic Plan Objective: Q3LC Detail
for autism spectrum disorders in children of the Nurses' Health Study ... for autism spectrum disorders in children of the Nurses' Health Study ... of autism spectrum disorders. Santangelo, Susan. Harvard Medical ... Strategic Plan Objective: Q3LC Detail. Projects Home Strategic Plan Objective Detail. Question 3: Long-term Objective C. 3LC. Determine the effect of at least five environmental factors on the risk for subtypes of ASD in the pre- and early postnatal period of development by 2015. IACC Recommended Budget: $25,100,000 over 7 years. Download 2010 Question 3: Long-term Objective C projects EXCEL 10 projects found Displaying all projects. Maternal risk factors for autism spectrum disorders in children of the Nurses' Health Study II. Harvard University. Maternal risk factors for autism spectrum disorders in children of the Nurses' Health Study II. Santangelo, Susan. Maternal dietary factors and risk of autism spectrum disorders. Santangelo, Susan. Harvard Medical School. Project 1: Environmental ep...
https://iacc.hhs.gov/apps/portfolio-analysis-web-tool/objective?d-1342871-p=1&d-1342871-s=1&d-1342871-o=1&objectiveId=q3lc&objectiveId=q3lc&fy=2010
*  Medical Xpress - NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
people with a rare disorder that causes excessive childhood ... appears to increase social behaviors in newborn rhesus monkeys, ... Medical Xpress - NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Home. Partners NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development sorted by liverank. NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. sort by:. Date. 6 hours. 12 hours. 1 day. 3 days. all. Rank. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. all. LiveRank. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. all. Popular. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. all. Genetics. Researchers link chromosome region to duplication of gene on X chromosome appears to cause excessive growth. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found a duplication of a short stretch of the X chromosome in some people with a rare disorder that causes excessive childhood growth. They believe that a single gene ... Dec 03, 2014 0 0. Pediatrics. Nearly 55 percent of US infants sleep with potentially unsafe bedding. Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infant...
http://medicalxpress.com/partners/nih-national-institute-of-child-health-and-human-development/sort/liverank/all/
*  Researchers identify cause for severe pediatric epilepsy disorder | EurekAlert! Science News
pediatric epilepsy disorder. EurekAlert. Science News. Skip to ... Policy Ethics. Social Behavioral. Space Planetary. Tech ... Policy Ethics. Social Behavior. Space Planetary. Tech...
http://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-03/uoc--ric031109.php
*  Medical Xpress - social interaction
... Home social interaction ... News tagged with social interaction. sort by:. Date. 6 hours ... · autism spectrum disorders · neurons. Autism spectrum disorders ... may be too narrow. Social interaction. Social interaction is a...
http://medicalxpress.com/tags/social interaction/sort/popular/1m/
*  REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: What Are the Symptoms?
REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: What Are the Symptoms. Slideshow Pictures. Image Gallery. Medications. Medical Dictionary. Site Map October 4, 2015 Like Us. sleep disorders center. sleep disorders a-z list. rem sleep behavior disorder article. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Foods That Help or Harm Your Sleep Slideshow Pictures. REM Sleep Disorder Overview. REM Sleep Disorder Causes. REM Sleep Disorder Symptoms. When to Seek Medical Care. Self-Care at Home. Medications. For More Information on REM Sleep Disorders. REM Sleep Disorder Overview. Normal sleep has 2 distinct states: non- rapid eye movement NREM and rapid eye movement REM sleep. However, the brain is highly active, and the electrical activity recorded in the brain by EEG during REM sleep is similar to that recorded during wakefulness. In a person with REM sleep behavior disorder RBD , the paralysis that normally occurs during REM sleep is incomplete or absent, allowing the person to act out his or her dreams. Medical Editor: Erasmo A Passaro, MD. Next Pa...
http://emedicinehealth.com/rem_sleep_behavior_disorder/article_em.htm
*  CPAP Community - View topic - REM Apnea | REM Sleep Behavior Disorder
REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Post a reply. newguy1 Posts: 8 Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:11 am Gender:. Reply with quote. REM Apnea. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. by newguy1 on Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:53 am. New to this forum but just diagnosed with REM Apnea RDI over 40 during REM sleep only and REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or REM sleep without atonia. I was wondering if there is anyone on the board who was diagnosed with REM Apnea and REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. kteague Posts: 6055 Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 8:30 pm Location: West and Midwest Gender:. Reply with quote. Re: REM Apnea. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. by kteague on Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:02 pm. Machine: S9 VPAP S BiLevel Machine. Mask: TAP PAP Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Improved Stability Mouthpiece. Humidifier: S9 Series H5i Heated Humidifier with Climate Control. Reply with quote. Re: REM Apnea. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. by Muse-Inc on Tue Apr 06, 2010 1:34 pm. Mask: Hybrid Full Face CPAP Mask with Nasal Pillows and Headgear. Humidifie...
http://cpaptalk.com/viewtopic/t51004/REM-Apnea--REM-Sleep-Behavior-Disorder.html
*  Video analysis of motor events in REM sleep behavior disorder - ResearchGate
... Article Video analysis of motor events in REM sleep behavior disorder. Birgit Frauscher McGill University Message author. Remove suggestion. Remove suggestion. Remove suggestion. Remove suggestion. Remove suggestion. Remove suggestion. Impact Factor: 5.68. behaviour disorder have even higher rates of motor events during REM sleep, similar to that in patients with ParkinsonÕs disease with REM sleep behaviour disorder Frauscher et al., 2007, or if alternatively there is only a mild difference in the rate of motor events between patients with narcolepsy with and without REM sleep behaviour disorder. Motor disturbances during non-REM and REM sleep in narcolepsy-cataplexy: A video-polysomnographic analysis. ABSTRACT: Motor events during sleep can be frequently observed in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy. We aimed to perform a detailed whole-night video-polysomnographic analysis of all motor events during non-rapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep in a group of narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and mat...
http://researchgate.net/publication/227784250_Video_analysis_of_motor_events_in_REM_sleep_behavior_disorder
*  REM Sleep Behavior Disorder - Media Relations - Northwestern Medicine
... Lurie Cancer Center Program to Tackle Breast Cancer with Precision Medicine. Northwestern s Lurie Cancer Center Hosts 22nd Annual Cancer Survivors Walk & 5K on May 31. About Northwestern Medicine. The Woman’s Board of Northwestern Memorial Hospital Hosts ‘Tune Up!’ to Raise Awareness for Music Programs. Media Relations. While Asleep, Some People Act Out Their Dreams November 26, 2012 CHICAGO - Northwestern Medicine offers specialized clinic for REM sleep behavior disorder When Patricia Becker noticed a man crouching in the corner while she was in a public restroom, she felt threatened and concerned. Becker suffers from REM sleep behavior disorder RBD , a condition that causes a person to unconsciously act out their dreams while still asleep. To help patients like Becker, Northwestern Medicine offers a specialized RBD clinic that integrates clinical care with research and education for medical professionals. RBD can be very dangerous to the people who have it, as well as those who share a bed with them, s...
http://news.nm.org/rem-sleep-behavior-disorder.html
*  Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
... 'Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder' 'RBD' is a sleep disorder more specifically a parasomnia that involves abnormal behavior during the sleep phase with rapid eye movement REM sleep. The major and arguably only abnormal feature of RBD is loss of muscle atonia i.e., the loss of paralysis during otherwise intact REM sleep during which paralysis is not only normal but necessary. Symptoms Causes Idiopathic RBD causes. Rapid eye movement behavior disorder RBD occurs when there is a loss of normal voluntary muscle atonia during REM sleep resulting in motor behavior in response to dream content. It can be caused by adverse reactions to certain drugs or during drug withdrawal; however, it is most often associated with the elderly and in those with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases for example multiple system atrophy and Lewy body dementia. This category of RBD is strongly associated with neurodegenerative disease s. 5 About 15% of Parkinson's pat...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapid_eye_movement_sleep_behavior_disorder
*  JCSM - Validation of the Mayo Sleep Questionnaire to Screen for REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in a
... Community-Based Sample. Search article archive here All Volumes 11 2015 10 2014 09 2013 08 2012 07 2011 06 2010 05 2009 04 2008 03 2007 02 2006 01 2005. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 All Issues. All Words Any Words. Search. ADVERTISEMENT. Current Issue: Volume: 11 Number: 09 View Current Issue. Subscribe Login. Issue Navigator Volume 09 No. 05. Scientific Investigations Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Subsequent Risk of Depressive Disorder: A Population-Based Follow-up Study .417-423 Yi-Hua Chen, Ph.D. 1 ; Joseph K. Keller, M.S., M.P.H. 1 ; Jiunn-Horng Kang, M.D., Ph.D. 2, 3, 4 ; Heng-Ju Hsieh, M.S. 5 ; Herng-Ching Lin, Ph.D. 5, 6 Obstructive Sleep Apnea after Weight Loss: A Clinical Trial Comparing Gastric Bypass and Intensive Lifestyle Intervention .427-432 Jan Magnus Fredheim, M.D. 1, 2, 3 ; Jan Rollheim, M.D., Ph.D. 1 ; Rune Sandbu, M.D., Ph.D. 1 ; Dag Hofsø, M.D., Ph.D. 1 ; Torbjørn Omland, M.D., Ph.D. 3 ; Jo Røislien, M.D., M.Sc. 1, 5 ; Jøran Hjelmesæth, M.D., Ph.D. 1 Evaluation of Drug-Induc...
http://aasmnet.org/jcsm/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=28948
*  REM
Biology. Medicine. Technology. News. Definition. Dictionary. RSS Navigation Links Biology News Medicine News Biology Products Medicine Products Biology Definition Medicine Definition Biology Technology Medicine Technology Biology Dictionary Medicine Dictionary. REM in Medical News. quickly adapted to the 22-hour cycle, but their rem sleep continued to follow a 25-hour cycle. Initially, rem Medical will provide obstructive sleep apnea ... REM sleep associated with overweight in children and adolescents ... Decreased total sleep time associated with increased REM sleep during subsequent naps ... is associated with an increased percentage of rem sleep during subsequent naps, according to a ... total sleep time increased the percentage of rem sleep during the nap. Average total sleep time ... total sleep time, more stage 1 sleep, and less rem sleep, said Dr. Naps with rapid eye movement sleep increase receptiveness to positive emotion ... REM in Medical Technology Mayo Clinic Studies Find REM Sleep Behavior Disor...
http://bio-medicine.org/q/rem/
*  REM Sleep Disorder May Cause Alzheimer’s And Other Brain Diseases
... Vitality Under the Hood Innovation The Hill The Grapevine Weird Medicine Conditions. 8 Healthy Vegetarian Recipes That Are Perfect For Fall. Behavior, Neuroscience & Your Brain. Weird Medicine. 4 Weird Things That Can Happen To Your Tongue. Healthy Living. Healthy Living. REM Sleep Disorder May Cause Alzheimer’s And Other Brain Diseases. Susan Scutti. Researchers have discovered that REM rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, which causes people to act out their dreams, is a predictor of brain diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Now, researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered that a particular sleep disorder that causes people to act out their dreams is a predictor of brain diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. "Rapid-eye-movement sleep behaviour disorder RBD is not just a precursor but also a critical warning sign of neurodegeneration that can lead to brain disease," said Dr. “In fact, as many as 80 to 90 per cent of people with RBD will develop a brain disease.". Wh...
http://medicaldaily.com/rem-sleep-disorder-may-cause-alzheimers-and-other-brain-diseases-278140
*  Joseph W Burns
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts USA. Michigan Technological University Burns Joseph W Burns. Research Topics rem sleep behavior disorder polysomnography data display fibromyalgia mathematical computing neurodegenerative diseases sleep stages roc curve computer assisted signal processing electromyography pain measurement electroencephalography algorithms predictive value of tests case control studies postoperative care obstructive sleep apnea tonsillectomy sleep apnea syndromes cohort studies adenoidectomy respiration severity of illness index analysis of variance work of breathing periodicity respiratory physiologic phenomena sleep respiratory physiology cross sectional studies. Joseph W Burns Summary Affiliation: Michigan Technological University Country: USA. Publications EMG variance during polysomnography as an assessment for REM sleep behavior disorder Joseph W Burns Michigan Tech Research Institute, Michigan Technological University, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA Sleep 30:1771-8. 2007 Sleep s...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/michigan/burns/joseph-w-burns-1218036.html
*  SLEEP
... CURRENT ISSUE OCTOBER 2015. Purchase The Current Issue You now have the option of ordering a print copy of the current issue of SLEEP for U.S. Click here to complete the purchase. Click here to complete the purchase. Please note, access to the article is from the computer on which the article was purchased only. ABOUT SLEEP. A joint publication of the Sleep Research Society and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine LOG IN. CURRENT ISSUE:. Sleep Duration and Five-Year Abdominal Fat Accumulation in a Minority Cohort: The IRAS Family Study Does less sleep mean more fat. investigates the relationship sleep duration has with body mass index, visceral adopose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue in two minority groups. Social and Health Correlates of Sleep Duration in a US Hispanic Population: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sanjay R. Harvey, PhD Sleepiness in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Parkinson Disease Isabelle Arnulf, MD, PhD; Dulce Neutel, MD; Bastien H...
http://journalsleep.org/
*  Prevent violence by treating behavior disorders with biochemistry - NaturalNews.com
... About NaturalNews Contact Us Write for NaturalNews Media Info Advertising Info. Prevent violence by treating behavior disorders with biochemistry Friday, December 21, 2012 by: Talya Dagan Tags: behavior disorders, biochemistry, violence. CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work. NASA to make breakthrough Mars announcement on Monday. CDC issues flu vaccine apology: this year's vaccine doesn't work. NASA to make breakthrough Mars announcement on Monday. 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized. 75% of children who received vaccines in Mexican town now dead or hospitalized. We need to learn to identify children with behavior disorders and get them the help they need. Nutritional treatment for brain chemistry Most people who exhibit violent behavior have abnormal brain and body chemistry. Follow real-time breaking news headlines on Behavior disorders at FETCH.news The world of independent media, all in one place. More news on behavior disorders BP...
http://naturalnews.com/038427_behavior_disorders_biochemistry_violence.html
*  .. Child Behavior Disorders Are not a Life Sentence
You are here: Home / Conditions/Diagnoses / Child Behavior Disorders Are not a Life Sentence. Child Behavior Disorders Are not a Life Sentence. September 7, 2008 By. parentingteens. Leave a Comment. Hearing that your child is being diagnosed with a child behavior disorder can be, and often is, a life changing event for your child and your family, but it is important that you realize child bipolar disorder is not a sentence. Your child’s life will be affected by the disorder, but that life does not have to be imprisoned by it. New medicines, new therapies, and new research have created a new hope for child behavior disorder. And the hope of tomorrow is the force that pulls us through today. At the time of diagnosis it is normal for your emotions to run with a mixture of fear, guilt, anger, and sorrow. But despite this uncertainty, your focus needs to shift from the present to the future of both you and your child fighting a behavior disorder. You will need to learn what options are available, what medication...
http://parentingteens.com/child-behavior-disorders-are-not-a-life-sentence/
*  VerusMed: Neurologic implications in sleep abnormalities
The origin of many sleep abnormalities, such as narcolepsy and REM sleep behavior disorder, continue to puzzle neurologists, although recent developments in the study of the switch-like mechanisms of sleep-wake pathways are aiding in the understanding of this neural circuitry, according to Dr. REM sleep is characterized by full activity of the cholinergic system while the monoaminergic system is inactive. Non-REM sleep is characterized by decreased activity in the monoaminergic system and no activity in the cholinergic pathway. During wakefulness, the arousal pathways inhibit activity of the VLPO. This mutual inhibition is called a "flip-flop switch" because as inhibition of either system progresses, it results rapidly in an end state of either sleep or wakefulness. Orexin neurons activate the entire ascending arousal system and also the cerebral cortex. The VLPO is like an 'off" switch for the arousal systems of the brain and also turns off the orexin neurons, allowing for sleep. Saper and his colleagues pre...
http://verusmed.com/articles/view/47279/
*  Parkinson
About PDF. About PDF. PDF People. Press Room. Employment Opportunities. Work with Patient Advocates. Sign Up for Funding News. npj Parkinson's Disease. Parkinson's News. Support a PDF Champion. Home / Understanding Parkinson's / Parkinson's News / Science News. National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News. Science News Community News PDF in the News. Parkinson's HelpLine. RBD is associated with the development of Parkinson s disease and may be an early non-motor sign of the disease. Another less severe sleep disturbance, REM sleep without atonia, has also been associated with PD. The study explored the relationship of PD with freezing of gait and increased muscle activity during REM sleep. It was led by Aleksandar Videnovic, M.D., M.Sc., Assistant Professor of Neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, who was granted the 2008 Parkinson s Disease Foundation PDF /American Academy Brain Foundation ABF Clinician-Scientist Development Award to study sleep patt...
http://pdf.org/en/science_news/release/pr_1378750084/
*  Why Don't We Act Out During Our Sleep ?
Imagine what 'catastrophe' would be if, during sleeping and dreaming, we wouldn't have brain mechanisms which work to inhibit our movements and actions. When we are sleeping, we have an adaptative mechanism that protect us from ourselves or from injuries to other people. The same mechanisms of the brain stem that control the sleep processes of the forebrain also inhibit the spinal motor neurons, preventing the descending motor activity from expressing itself as actual movement. Systems that inhibit movement in REM sleep. In normal REM sleep the pons strongly. activates the inbibitory center in the medulla. The midline inhibitory zone in the pons inhibits. the lateral locomotor strip not shown here, see next figure. The result is complete paralysis. B In REM sleep without paralysis the lesions break the connections from the pons to the locomotor strip and to the medullary center. I n REM sleep the pons is activated, exciting the medullary. inbibitory area by projections tegmento-reticular tract which. connects...
http://cerebromente.org.br/n13/curiosities/desligamento_i.htm
*  Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience 8th Edition | 9780205790357 | eCampus.com
Chapter 6 Vision 146 PROLOGUE ¿¿Seeing Without Perceiving 147 The Stimulus 148 Anatomy of the Visual System 149 The Eyes 149 Photoreceptors 151 Connections Between Eye and Brain 152 Coding of Visual Information in the Retina 154 Coding of Light and Dark 154 Coding of Color 155 Analysis of Visual Information: Role of the Striate Cortex 158 Anatomy of the Striate Cortex 158 Orientation and Movement 158 Spatial Frequency 159 Retinal Disparity 160 Color 160 Modular Organization of the Striate Cortex 161 Analysis of Visual Information: Role of the Visual Association Cortex 162 Two Streams of Visual Analysis 162 Perception of Color 164 Perception of Form 166 Perception of Movement 169 Perception of Spatial Location 172 EPILOGUE ¿¿Case Studies 175 Key Concepts 176 Suggested Readings 176 Additional Resources 176. Chapter 8 Sleep and Biological Rhythms 212 PROLOGUE ¿¿Waking Nightmares 213 A Physiological and Behavioral Description of Sleep 213 Disorders of Sleep 217 Insomnia 217 Narcolepsy 218 REM Sleep Behavior Disor...
http://ecampus.com/foundations-behavioral-neuroscience-8th/bk/9780205790357
*  Lost My Virginity and Now I’m Sleeping Around and Drinking A Lot | Ask the Therapist
Lost My Virginity and Now I m Sleeping Around and Drinking A Lot. Ask the Therapist. Home Conditions Addictions ADHD Anxiety Panic Autism Bipolar Depression Eating Disorders OCD Parenting Personality Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships Schizophrenia Sleep Stress Something Else... Quizzes News Experts Ask the Therapist Blogs Experts Daily News Research Updates World of Psychology Research Resources Find a clinical Trial Resources Forums Support Groups Find Help Ask the Therapist Drugs Medications Find a Therapist Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Take a Quiz Mood Tracker Pro. Home Conditions Quizzes Ask the Therapist Drugs Blogs News Research Resources Find Help Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Pro. Lost My Virginity and Now I m Sleeping Around and Drinking A Lot. By Julie Hanks, LCSW. Click here if you need help to find a therapist in your area. You can feel good about yourself again. Julie Hanks, LCSW. About Julie Hanks, LCSW. Visit Julie's new blog for therapists Private Practice Toolbox View all ...
http://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2011/07/09/lost-my-virginity-and-now-im-sleeping-around-and-drinking-a-lot/
*  Dreams End Before Defining Moment | Ask the Therapist
Dreams End Before Defining Moment. Ask the Therapist. Home Conditions Addictions ADHD Anxiety Panic Autism Bipolar Depression Eating Disorders OCD Parenting Personality Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships Schizophrenia Sleep Stress Something Else... Quizzes News Experts Ask the Therapist Blogs Experts Daily News Research Updates World of Psychology Research Resources Find a clinical Trial Resources Forums Support Groups Find Help Ask the Therapist Drugs Medications Find a Therapist Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Take a Quiz Mood Tracker Pro. Home Conditions Quizzes Ask the Therapist Drugs Blogs News Research Resources Find Help Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Pro. Dreams End Before Defining Moment. I have a dream in which i meet a girl. This is becoming an issue because these women i meet in my dream life begin to occupy my thoughts in real life. That can actually be helped by a good therapist. Diana Walcutt. Walcutt, D. Dreams End Before Defining Moment. Psych Central. Retrieved on October 4, 2...
http://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2009/07/01/dreams-end-before-defining-moment/
*  JCSM - I Couldn’t Sleep at all Last Night
JCSM - I Couldn t Sleep at all Last Night. Search article archive here All Volumes 11 2015 10 2014 09 2013 08 2012 07 2011 06 2010 05 2009 04 2008 03 2007 02 2006 01 2005. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 All Issues. All Words Any Words. Search. ADVERTISEMENT. Current Issue: Volume: 11 Number: 09 View Current Issue. Subscribe Login. Issue Navigator Volume 01 No. 01. Editorials Expanding the Frontiers of Clinical Sleep Medicine .9 Michael J. Sateia, M.D. Now We Begin .10 Stuart F. Quan, M.D. Home Portable Monitoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea .11-13 Conrad Iber, M.D. Polysomnographic Technologists Troubled Waters Ahead. .14-15 Lawrence J. Epstein, M.D. Pro/Con Debate Routine Polysomnography is Indicated in Congestive Heart Failure .16-18 Matthew T. Naughton, M.D. Routine Polysomnography is Not Indicated in Congestive Heart Failure .19-22 Allan I. Pack, M.B., Ch.B., Ph.D. 1,3 ; Lee R. Goldberg, M.D., M.P.H 2, 3. Scientific Investigations A Quantitative Assessment of Sleep Laboratory Activity in the United S...
http://aasmnet.org/jcsm/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=26301
*  Parkinsons Progression Marker's Initiative | Parkinson's Disease Information
Parkinsons Progression Marker's Initiative. Parkinson's Disease Information. One-Time Monthly In Tribute Team Fox. Our Impact. Leadership Staff. Clinical Trial Participation. Team Fox Updates. Diagnosis & Symptoms Causes. Smell Loss. For Clinicians Resources for Clinicians. Genetics: LRRK2. #FoxPD Twitter Chats. Tribute Gift. Team Fox Donation. Tribute Pages What is a Tribute Page. Participate in Clinical Trials Why Participate in Trials. Fox Trial Finder. PPMI Clinical Study. Fundraise with Team Fox Team Fox Home. Team Fox Event Calendar. Shop Fox. PPMI. Trial Recruitment & Support. Our Work With Industry MJFF & Industry. Parkinsons Progression Marker's Initiative Australia Germany Italy US UK. Study Overview The Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative PPMI is a landmark clinical study to better understand the progression of Parkinson’s disease PD. The goal of PPMI is to identify and assess biomarkers, objective measures of Parkinson’s disease in people who have PD, people who do not have PD and groups of...
https://michaeljfox.org/page.html?parkinsons-progression-markers-initiative&s_src=p3mi_launch&s_subsrc=press release
*  Catholic.net - Respect Life Month / RESOURCES
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http://catholic.net/index.php?option=channel&canal=&id=8738&pagina=144
*  Catholic.net - Saturday in the Octave of Easter
doxycycline wikipedia iindonesia vollemaan.org ondansetron oral solution hindi matalab caribdate.com clomid challenge miscarriage cgtheink.com how to prevent headache after taking cialis viagra in kerala using can i use ketoconazole to treat ghonorrhea nlpcloud.net metformin tab 750 mg er muslim-academy.com what happens if you take 2 doses of diflucan together internetowe-szkolenia.pl secondary effects of synthroid does celexa cause bad dreams xenical tablete cena u srbiji arinijayapress.com seroquel zopiklon prednisone taper oxycontin dose solumedrol prednisone is bactrim ds a sulfa drug metformina xp 500 metformin infertility side effects drugs like buspirone singulair copd asthma 250 milligram lamisil tablets and alcohol cephalexin for dogs urinary infection prozac 7 weeks side effects of stopping duloxetine how many mg of lexapro to overdose nizoral 2 and hair growth nlpcloud.net alfa estradiol e gravidez amlodipine besylate 5mg and grapefruit champions-league-news.com rem sleep behavior disorder gabapent...
http://catholic.net/index.php?option=channel&canal=&id=8821&pagina=147
*  IRPB (formerly IRBD) Photo Gallery | International Review of Psychosis & Bipolarity | IRPB
IRPB formerly IRBD Photo Gallery. International Review of Psychosis & Bipolarity. IRPB. International Review of Psychosis & Bipolarity Join us in Rome, Italy, 22-24 May 2016. Chair: Prof Giulio Perugi IT. The ONLY speciality International Conference in Schizophrenia & Bipolar Disorders in Europe in 2016. LATEST NEWS:. CONTACT US. Home. Conference. Introduction. Advisory Committee. Programme. Conference Speakers. Register. Group Registrations. Student Registrations. Venue, travel accomodation. Poster/Oral Submissions. Submit Poster Abstract. Submit Oral Platform. Submit Single Speaker Session. Submit Multi Speaker Symposia. Bursary Requests. Deadlines, Guidelines Rules. Certificate of Attendance. Press. Future Conferences. Previous Conferences. IRBD 2013 Gallery. Associated Societies/Organisation. Become an Associate. Associated Societies/Organisations. Official Media Partners. In the Media. IRPB on Facebook. IRPB on Twitter. Psychiatry in the Media. Research. Interesting Reading. Psychiatry Bookstore. Sponsor...
http://irbd.org/conferencegallery.php?id=4&title=IRBD 2011
*  animal social behaviour | Britannica.com
animal social behaviour. Britannica.com. Shop. School and Library Subscribers. LOGIN. Activate Your Free Trial. Stories. quizzes. galleries. lists. Animal social behaviour. Written by: Walter Koenig Last Updated 6-19-2015. Read. View All Media 24. Table of Contents. Introduction. General characteristics. Categorizing the diversity of social behaviour. The range of social behaviour in animals. A historical perspective on the study of social behaviour. The how and why of social behaviour. Proximate versus ultimate causation. Strong inference and the scientific study of social behaviour. The ultimate causes of social behaviour. Social interactions involving sex. Social interactions involving the costs and benefits of parental care. Social interactions involving the use of space. Social interactions involved in monopolizing resources or mates. Social interactions involving movement. Social interactions involving cooperative breeding and eusociality. Social interactions involving communication. The proximate mecha...
http://britannica.com/topic/animal-social-behaviour
*  social interaction - Frequency
... Sign In Sign Up. Follow @OnFrequency. Guide. social interaction. 2w ago. Top New. Add. Awkward Social Interactions. social interaction 2w ago. Exterion Media - Social Interaction abri's. social interaction 4mo ago. 6 Fun Ways To Turn Any Social Interaction Sexual. social interaction 5mo ago. Social Interaction Trainer. social interaction 5mo ago. Augmenting Social Interactions. social interaction 5mo ago. SOCIAL INTERACTION TRAINER - An Autobiography. social interaction 6mo ago. HOW TO NOT BE SOCIALLY AWKWARD Social Interaction Trainer. social interaction 6mo ago. Log Out and Reach Out: A Social Interaction Campaign. social interaction 6mo ago. Social Interaction Trainer. BE A SOCIALIZER!!. social interaction 8mo ago. Lebendige Beziehungen Teil 1. social interaction 8mo ago. Social Interaction Trainer Joey Rage Quits. social interaction 8mo ago. Social Interaction Trainer. IT'S RUDE TO STARE AT BOOBS. social interaction 10mo ago. Redes 93: Somos supersociales por naturaleza - relaciones sociales. social ...
http://frequency.com/topic/social interaction?cid=5-1271850
*  .. Track your Social Signals in Google Analytics and Webmaster tools .. Related .. Pages .. Recent
Track your Social Signals in Google Analytics and Webmaster tools. June 30, 2011. admin. Leave a comment. Its been a busy couple of weeks for Google, with the launch of their +1 and Google+ set to rival Facebook they are proving to have their finger on the pulse when it comes to becoming more social after appearing to be a little reluctant to jump on the social band wagon. Google Analytics and Google Webmaster Tools have added new tools for tracking the impact of tweets, likes, +1s more on your website’s traffic. Google Webmaster Tools now allows you to report on the impact of the +1 Button and how this can affect your click through rate. You can also view the new “Activity Report” within Webmaster Tools which will help you see how many +1’s your site pages have received. A great new tool launched within Google Analytics is the Social Plugin Tracking tools. This not only tracks +1s but other Social Signals such as Twitter tweets, Facebook Likes and Facebook Sends. Google recently admitted that Social ...
http://karen-heslop.co.uk/2011/06/30/track-your-social-signals-in-google-analytics-and-webmaster-tools/
*  Modeling Social Behavior (R01) | National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC)
Modeling Social Behavior R01. National Sexual Violence Resource Center NSVRC. Skip to main content. About Us Contact Us My Account. Log In. Search form. Search this site. HOME RESOURCES. News Projects Publications Organizations Experts Library. CONNECT. Conference Calendar Opportunities Blogs Podcasts xCHANGE. eLEARNING. Campus Browse Portal Search Portal Submit Tool. LIBRARY STORE Donate to NSVRC. HOME. CONNECT. OPPORTUNITIES. FUNDING Modeling Social Behavior R01. Modeling Social Behavior R01. Opportunities. Funding Careers Nominations Call for Works Educational. Conference Blogs Calendar Podcasts. Funding Source:. National Institutes of Health. Type of Funding:. federal. Nonprofits, government entities, for-profits, schools. This Funding Opportunity Announcement FOA encourages applications for developing and testing innovative theories and computational, mathematical, or engineering approaches to deepen our understanding of complex social behavior. This research will examine phenomena at multiple scales to ...
http://nsvrc.org/opportunities/funding/modeling-social-behavior-r01?qt-sidebar_qt_1=2&qt-sidebar_qt_2=0
*  The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network Over 32 Years.
... FAS Scholarly Articles View Item. The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network Over 32 Years. The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network Over 32 Years. ; Christakis, Nicholas Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors. Christakis, Nicholas A. The spread of obesity in a large social network over 32 years. Christakis SpreadofObesity.pdf 391.5Kb; PDF. Christakis SpreadofObesitySupplement.pdf 325.0Kb; PDF. Background: The prevalence of obesity has increased substantially over the past 30 years. We used longitudinal statistical models to examine whether weight gain in one person was associated with weight gain in his or her friends, siblings, spouse, and neighbors. Results: Discernible clusters of obese persons body-mass index, 30 were present in the network at all time points, and the clusters extended to three degrees of separation. These clusters did not appear to be solely attributable to the selective formation of social ties among obese persons. A person's cha...
http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/3710802
*  Phys.org - social animals(... continued page 3)
Phys.org - social animals ... Home social animals. News tagged with social animals. sort by:. 6 hours. 12 hours. 1 day. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. Man's best friend. People have an innate need to establish close relationships with other people. But this natural bonding behaviour is not confined to humans: many animals also seem to need relationships with others of their kind. Jun 21, 2013 in Plants & Animals. Jun 17, 2013 in Plants & Animals. Spanish and US scientists have successfully identified animal species that can transmit more diseases to humans by using mathematical tools similar to those applied to the study of social networks like Facebook or Twitter. Jun 11, 2013 in Plants & Animals. Social networks could help prevent disease outbreaks in endangered chimpanzees. Phys.org —Many think of social networks in terms of Facebook friends and Twitter followers, but for recent University of Georgia doctoral graduate Julie Rushmore, social networks are too...
http://phys.org/tags/social animals/page3.html
*  Medical Xpress - social interaction
... Home social interaction. News tagged with social interaction. sort by:. Date. 6 hours. 12 hours. 1 day. 3 days. all. Rank. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. all. LiveRank. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. all. Popular. Last day. 1 week. 1 month. all. Related topics: autism · brain · children · autism spectrum disorders · neurons. Sorry, no news articles match your request. Your search criteria may be too narrow. Social interaction. Social interaction is a dynamic, changing sequence of social actions between individuals or groups who modify their actions and reactions according to those of their interaction partner s. In other words, they are events in which people attach meaning to a situation, interpret what others are meaning, and respond accordingly. Social interactions can be differentiated into:. In sociological hierarchy, social interaction is more advanced than behavior, action, social behavior, social action and social contact, and is in turn followed by more advanced concept of social relation. In other word...
http://medicalxpress.com/tags/social interaction/sort/liverank/1d/
*  Nerds Needing Social Skills.. - Caffeine Lounge | Dream.In.Code
Nerds Needing Social Skills.. - Caffeine Lounge. Dream.In.Code. . Search:. Advanced Forum Search. Forums. Programming. Web Development. Computers. Tutorials. Snippets. Dev Blogs. Jobs. Lounge. Login. Join. Today's Topics. Dream.In.Code. General Discussion. Caffeine Lounge. Nerds needing social skills.. No way!. 3 Pages. 1 2 3. New Topic/Question. Reply. 43 Replies - 2034 Views - Last Post: 31 January 2009 - 08:43 AM. #1. Winstinology. I'm pretty good with a laser mouse.. Reputation: 7. Posts: 958. Joined: 08-May 08. Nerds needing social skills.. Posted 12 January 2009 - 03:22 PM Came across this funny thread on Slashdot today.. According to Reuters, Potsdam University in Germany is now teaching social skills as part of their IT courses. This is intended to 'ease entry into the world of work'. The 440 students enrolled in the master's degree course will learn how to write flirtatious text messages and emails, impress people at parties and cope with rejection s. Have we really become that ba...
http://dreamincode.net/forums/topic/80527-nerds-needing-social-skills/
*  The First Drug that Could Ease Social Withdrawal in Autism | TIME.com
The First Drug that Could Ease Social Withdrawal in Autism. TIME.com. Time.com. MY ACCOUNT SIGN IN SIGN OUT SUBSCRIBE Home. Subscribe Newsletters Feedback Privacy Policy Your California Privacy Rights Terms of Use Ad Choices. 2015 Time Inc. Subscribe. Sign In Subscribe. Autism. The First Drug that Could Ease Social Withdrawal in Autism By Maia Szalavitz @maiasz Sept. An experimental drug showed promising results in treating the key symptom of social withdrawal in people with Fragile X syndrome, the most common known inherited cause of autism with intellectual disability, according to a recent clinical trial. The new study, published in Science Translational Medicine, hints that arbaclofen could be the first drug to treat symptoms of Fragile X and other autism spectrum disorders, and even other conditions involving social avoidance. In previous studies of mice that are missing the FMR1 gene and show autistic symptoms like repetitive behavior and social avoidance, arbaclofen has been able to treat these problem...
http://healthland.time.com/2012/09/20/the-first-drug-that-could-help-social-withdrawal-in-autism/?iid=hl-x-mostpop1
*  Project: Social behavior deficits in autism: Role of amygdala
project social behavior deficits in autism role of amygdala projects home project detail social behavior deficits in autism role of amygdala project description unavailable funder autism speaks fiscal year funding project number principal investigator mooney sandra strategic plan question question how can i understand what is happening biology strategic plan objective o not specific to question objectives federal or private private institution state university of new york upstate medical center state country new york web link no url available web link no url available web link no url available new history related projects social behavior deficits in autism role of amygdala social behavior deficits in autism role of amygdala...
https://iacc.hhs.gov/apps/portfolio-analysis-web-tool/project?projectId=4852&fy=2008
*  .. Is the School Required to Provide Social Skills Training? .. 05/07/12by Wrightslaw
Is the School Required to Provide Social Skills Training. 05/07/12 by Wrightslaw. My daughter with autism needs help with social skills. She gets 90 minutes of social skills counseling a month. I think she needs to learn “hands on” in class, lunch, or recess, not in the “office.”. Is the school required to provide social skills training? Would this be considered a related service. Here’s an easy to read description about social skills. Social skill is not a “service” but a functional skill necessary for daily living activities. Learn what the IDEA, the federal regulations, and the Commentary say about Present Levels of Functional Performance and IEP goals for functional skills. Read Pat Howey’s article What You Need to Know About IDEA: Present Levels of Functional Performance and Functional Goals in IEPs. http://www.wrightslaw.com/howey/iep.functional.perf.htm. Your child’s IEP must include a description of her Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance. If your child has â...
http://wrightslaw.com/blog/?p=6721
*  YaleNews | Sociability may depend upon brain cells generated in adolescence
Sociability may depend upon brain cells generated in adolescence. Yale News. Arts Humanities Business, Law, Society Campus Community Science Health World Environment. Topics Arts Humanities Business, Law, Society Campus Community Science Health World Environment Videos Photos Search. Sociability may depend upon brain cells generated in adolescence. Mice become profoundly anti-social when the creation of new brain cells is interrupted in adolescence, a surprising finding that may help researchers understand schizophrenia and other mental disorders, Yale researchers report. The Yale team decided to explore the function of these new brain cells in mice of different ages. However, adult mice that had neurogenesis blocked during adolescence showed no interest in exploring other adult mice and even evaded attempts made by other mice to engage in social behavior. “These mice acted like they did not recognize other mice as mice,” Kaffman said. Blocking adult neurogenesis had no effect on social behavior, suggesting t...
http://news.yale.edu/2011/10/03/sociability-may-depend-upon-brain-cells-generated-adolescence
*  NjeriChelimo/social stream at documents0.4.7 · GitHub
... Skip to content. Sign up Sign in. This repository. Features. Pricing. Watch. Star. NjeriChelimo. / social stream. forked from ging/social stream. Code Pull requests. Pulse Graphs HTTPS clone URL. Subversion checkout URL. You can clone with. Subversion. Social Stream is a core for building social network websites. http://social-stream.dit.upm.es/. 1,823 commits. 6 branches. Fetching contributors. Tag: documents0.4.7. Switch branches/tags. Branches. Tags. It provides a robust and flexible core with social networking features and activity streams for building websites. Social networking platforms stand among the most popular websites, while many content oriented applications are supporting social networking features in order to improve engagement, enhance user awareness and stimulate communities around the website. Social Stream is based on social network analysis SNA concepts and methods, including social entities actors, ties and relations. Social Stream is so flexible that you can define custom actors gr...
https://github.com/NjeriChelimo/social_stream/tree/documents0.4.7
*  NjeriChelimo/social stream at base0.9.24 · GitHub
... Skip to content. Sign up Sign in. This repository. Features. Enterprise. Pricing. Watch. Star. NjeriChelimo. / social stream. forked from ging/social stream. Code Pull requests. Pulse Graphs HTTPS clone URL. Subversion checkout URL. You can clone with. Subversion. Social Stream is a core for building social network websites. http://social-stream.dit.upm.es/. 1,727 commits. 6 branches. Fetching contributors. Tag: base0.9.24. Switch branches/tags. Branches. Tags. It provides a robust and flexible core with social networking features and activity streams for building websites. Social networking platforms stand among the most popular websites, while many content oriented applications are supporting social networking features in order to improve engagement, enhance user awareness and stimulate communities around the website. Social Stream is based on social network analysis SNA concepts and methods, including social entities actors, ties and relations. Social Stream is so flexible that you can define custom a...
https://github.com/NjeriChelimo/social_stream/tree/base0.9.24
*  The scope of social attention deficits in autism: Prioritized orienting to people and animals in sta
Page 1 Neuropsychologia 48 2010 51–59 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Neuropsychologia journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/neuropsychologia The scope of social attention deficits in autism: Prioritized orienting to people and animals in static natural scenes Joshua J. Chawarska, Klin, Volkmar, 2003 but not in others Ristic et al., 2005, children with ASD cer- tainly have significant impairments in interpreting the meaning and social significance of the ‘language of the eyes’ Baron-Cohen, Joliffe, Mortimore, Robertson, 1997; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, etal.,1997 .Inamoreabstractrealm,childrenwithASDfailtospon- taneously attribute the social meanings that typically developing children automatically ascribe to displays of simple moving geo- metric shapes Abell, Happé, Frith, 2000; Klin, 2000; Rutherford, Pennington, Rogers, 2006 and they fail to efficiently process social information in point-light displays Blake, Turner, Smoski, Pozdol, Stone, 2003; Klin, Jones, Schultz, Volkmar, 2003; Klin, Lin,...
http://researchgate.net/publication/26747837_The_scope_of_social_attention_deficits_in_autism_Prioritized_orienting_to_people_and_animals_in_static_natural_scenes
*  .. DIY Brainless Robots Exhibit Collective Behavior .. About Tessel Renzenbrink
DIY Brainless Robots Exhibit Collective Behavior. By Tessel Renzenbrink on March 19, 2013 Posted in: technology Tags: BristleBots, mechanical intelligence, robots, swarm behavior, swarm intelligence, swarm robotics. We’ve all seen the amazing capabilities of flocks of birds and schools of fish to move seemingly as one. A lot of research is going into figuring out how swarm behavior works in order to mimic nature’s capabilities in swarm robotics. The ability of an individual agent to participate in collective behavior is often linked to cognition and social interaction implying that swarmbots require computational power and a sensor to function. But now scientists of Harvard university have demonstrated that brainless robots self-organize into coherent collective motion. The robots used in the experiment are BristleBots Bbots. These are very simple robots anyone can build for $5 from a toothbrush, a pager motor and a battery. When the brush head is pressed to the ground, the angled bristles give it forwar...
http://techthefuture.com/technology/diy-brainless-robots-exhibit-collective-behavior/
*  The Visualisation of Spatial Social Structure - Statistics Views
... The Visualisation of Spatial Social Structure. How do you draw a map of 100,000 places, of more than a million flows of people, of changes over time and space, of different kinds of spaces, surfaces and volumes, from human travel time to landscapes of hopes, fears, migration, manufacturing and mortality. The visualization of spatial social structure means, literally, making visible the geographical patterns to the way our lives have come to be socially organised, seeing the geography in society. To a statistical readership visualization implies using data. The Visualization of Spatial Social Structure introduces the reader to new ways of thinking about how to look at social statistics, particularly those about people in places. 2 People, spaces and places 31 2.1 Which people. 34 2.3 What are spaces. 9 Volume visualization 251 9.1 The third dimension 251 9.2 Spaces, times and places 252 9.3 Spacetime continuum 259 9.4 Three-dimensional graphs 262 9.5 Flows through time 275 9.6 Volume rendering 279 9.7 Int...
http://statisticsviews.com/details/book/2487241/The-Visualisation-of-Spatial-Social-Structure.html
*  social skills with emotional trama | LD OnLine
social skills with emotional trama. LD OnLine. Skip over navigation. Home. About Us. Contact Us. Newsletter. Search LD OnLine:. Home. Getting Started. LD Basics. ADHD Basics. Questions + Answers. Glossary. LD Topics. Multimedia. Teaching Kids with LD. Home-to-School Connection. Kids' Voices. Finding Help. Expert Advice. LD Resources. Yellow Pages. NJCLD. LearningStore. Support Us. Features. IDEA. Contributors. Personal Stories. Newsletters. Calendar. En español. Forums About Us. advertisement. You are here:. Features. LD OnLine Discussion Boards. Behavior: Social Skills, Self Esteem social skills with emotional trama. Previous Topic. Next Topic. Print this topic You are not subscribed. Return to main forum list. Behavior: Social Skills, Self Esteem social skills with emotional trama. Forum Jump Please select forum --------------------. Teaching Students with LD and ADHD Parenting a Child with LD or ADHD Postsecondary Education Adults with LD or ADHD Events and Announcements Behavior: Social Skills, Self Estee...
http://ldonline.org/xarbb/topic/11262
*  Farm Social Groupings
... Social Groupings within farm animals The social behaviour of farm animals is an important aspect of their sentience. Farm animals in natural conditions have quite complex social lives and social conventions. Living in groups requires awareness and understanding of the behaviour of others, and the ability to manage social interactions. Animal behaviour scientists have studied and compared the social lives of farm animals in natural, semi-natural and intensive farming conditions. In spite of thousands of years of domestic use, and decades of intensive breeding and farming, experts agree that the basic behaviour patterns and motivation of farm animals has changed little compared to their wild ancestors. Farmed pigs and chickens can revert to wild behaviour without difficulty. Cattle, pigs, sheep and chickens naturally live in herds or flocks. Many commercial farming methods cause social problems by joining unnaturally large numbers of animals together, changing or splitting up groups and mixing them with ot...
http://animalliberationfront.com/Philosophy/Morality/Speciesism/FarmSocialGroupings.htm
*  Social - Caffeine Lounge | Dream.In.Code - Page 3
Social - Caffeine Lounge. Programming. Web Development. Tutorials. Snippets. Caffeine Lounge. Social Life doesnt not revolve around just technical skill, but soft skill to. New Topic/Question. Reply. Reputation: 180. Posts: 2,641. Joined: 30-December 07. Re: Social Posted 26 June 2008 - 03:14 PM What's a soft skill. Was This Post Helpful. Back to top. MultiQuote. Quote + Reply. Reputation: 4562. Posts: 28,447. Joined: 21-March 01. Re: Social Posted 26 June 2008 - 03:23 PM whiskey dick. Was This Post Helpful. Back to top. MultiQuote. Quote + Reply. Reputation:. Re: Social Posted 26 June 2008 - 04:22 PM Ya know... Was This Post Helpful. Back to top. MultiQuote. Quote + Reply. Kaida. New D.I.C Head. Reputation: 0. Posts: 34. Joined: 19-June 08. Re: Social Posted 26 June 2008 - 06:23 PM so how is it like to spot a nerd.. guys, nerds are nerds.. you're a man right... i think a man dating a nerd would do him good... cos the girl shouldnt always be the one thinking what to do .. Was This Post Helpful. Back t...
http://dreamincode.net/forums/topic/55918-social/page__st__30
*  Having Fun in Az Social Group (Tempe, AZ) - Meetup
Having Fun in Az Social Group Tempe, AZ - Meetup. a Meetup Group Start a Meetup Group. Having Fun in Az Social Group. Home Members. Welcome to Havingfuninaz Social Group. We are a group of fun Professionals from all over the Valley comprised of members from 21 and up to 60's that want to have fun with diverse backgrounds including singles and couples whose goal is to meet new people, try new things, to have their social calendar filled. Join us and be the first to know when new Meetups are scheduled. 4 going. I will be there at 12:30 It is Sunday so that means you do not have to pay the meters for parking, Learn more Hosted by: cyndi Social Butterfly The group Founder. 80 s Party Cystic Fibrosis fundraisier Sat Oct 10 8:30 PM. 132 going. 4341 N 75th St, Scottsdale, AZ map. Learn more Hosted by: cyndi Social Butterfly The group Founder, and Corina Co-Organizer. 37 going. 4341 N 75th St, Scottsdale, AZ map. Learn more Hosted by: cyndi Social Butterfly The group Founder, and Fara. Free Fitness in The District - ...
http://meetup.com/having-fun-in-az/?page_start=1353104343959
*  .. Social CRM Transformation Demands CIO Leadership .. Learn More .. Follow CustomerThink .. Featur
Both CIOs and IT managers have scarce, valuable knowledge and experience about the best way to employ technology to make the business run better. Enter social CRM, which involves overlaying social networking capabilities onto traditional customer-focused marketing, sales, and service activities. CIOs See Social CRM Way Forward. When it comes to social CRM — as with cloud-based aka SaaS CRM — businesses need their CIOs and IT managers to help drive them forward, for two primary reasons:. Technology acumen: Today, social CRM technology Salesforce.com, Jive, Lithium varies wildly. Accordingly, businesses need technology experts who can help them evaluate the options, and think through how technical capabilities will map to solving discrete business challenges. Meanwhile, here’s a similar message for CIOs and IT managers: Step forward to help manage your business’s social CRM adoption strategy. When it comes to using social networks to solve discrete business challenges, it’s worth noting that beyond just technol...
http://customerthink.com/social_crm_transformation_demands_cio_leadership/
*  NIF | Searching in Literature
NIF. Searching in Literature. SciCrunch relies heavily on JavaScript. Many functions on the site will not work if you continue with JavaScript disabled. Login. Register. NIF LinkOut Portal. About. Add a Resource. Literature. Go. X. Sign In. Log In. X Forgot Password. If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email. Send. X. Leaving Community. Are you sure you want to leave this community. Leaving the community will revoke any permissions you have been granted in this community. No. Yes. Literature. Home Literature. Synaptic dysfunction and abnormal behaviors in mice lacking major isoforms of Shank3. SHANK3 is a synaptic scaffolding protein enriched in the postsynaptic density PSD of excitatory synapses. Small microdeletions and point mutations in SHANK3 have been identified in a small subgroup of individuals with autism spectrum disorder ASD and intellectual disability. SHANK3 also plays a key role in the chromosome 22q13.3 microdeletion syndro...
https://scicrunch.org/21558424/resource/nif-0000-34000
*  Diagnosis
... sponsored by diagnosis the diagnosis of autism is made on the basis of three main types of behavior abnormal social behavior and the presence of repetitive unimaginative activities within the first years of life the diagnosis of autism is based on observation of the individual s communication behavior and developmental levels and should be done by a number of professionals it is suggested that a team of professionals diagnose a child with autism within the first three years including a developmental pediatrician a psychologist or psychiatrist and a speech pathologist all with experience in the field ideally a multidisciplinary team would be established including in addition to those already mentioned a neurologist and a learning consultant the information provided by parents care givers provide a true picture of the behaviors and abilities of the individual if autism is not recognized and acknowledged a lack of services to meet the needs of the individual with autism will result often autism can be misdi...
http://angelfire.com/sc2/autism/diagnosis.html
*  The ASMR Experiment: ASMR and social grooming
... The ASMR Experiment. ASMR and social grooming. In previous posts I described a theory of ASMR check out the ASMR theory tag on the right side of this page ; my conclusion is that ASMR is primarly drived by triggers' precision, which leads us to a state of physical and mental stillness : a condition whose importance is often ignored in the West, but widely recognized by traditional cultures. Now it's time to look at a phenomenon which can sometimes lead to ASMR: grooming. Note: linking ASMR to biology may sound strange, as I previously supported a theory which explains this phenomenon in terms of acoustics and brain waves. Social grooming. Grooming is - according to etologists - the way members of some animal species take care of each other, primarly for igienic purposes; in some species, however, grooming becomes an important social activity. The first example is massage; even in this case the ASMR effect is not directly connected to the task, and it only takes place when a massage is "tingle-oriented" b...
http://theasmrexperiment.blogspot.com/2013/06/asmr-and-social-grooming.html
*  Factors influencing overnight loss of body mass in the communal roosts of a social bird - Research P
... ortal. Lancaster University. Faculties & Departments. Current Students. Current Staff. Quick Links A-Z index About Us Contact Getting Here Current Staff Current Students Faculties Departments Feedback Job Opportunities My eLearning News Media Sitemap Term Dates The Colleges. Find a course. Factors influencing overnight loss of body mass... Research at Lancaster. Departments Centres. Aegithalos caudatus, long-tailed tit, WINTER, FATTENING STRATEGIES, LONG-TAILED TITS, PREDATION RISK, PARUS-MAJOR, social organization, cooperative breeding, roosting behaviour, HUDDLING BEHAVIOR, nocturnal hypothermia, body mass regulation, ENERGETIC SIGNIFICANCE, FAT RESERVES, DAY LENGTH, NOCTURNAL HYPOTHERMIA. Factors influencing overnight loss of body mass in the communal roosts of a social bird. mark Journal publication date /mark 04/2009. mark Journal /mark Functional Ecology. is a social species that lives in flocks during the non-breeding season, forming linear roosting huddles in which individuals compete to avoid occ...
http://research.lancs.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/factors-influencing-overnight-loss-of-body-mass-in-the-communal-roosts-of-a-social-bird(811cbc14-920e-4f33-a1a9-4f245e72d9de).html
*  Paediatric Illness: The Role of Social Context in Childhood Cancer - eResearch
... qmu home. prospective students. current students. alumni and friends. business and industry. community. the university. schools and subjects. services. research. media relations. library services. Login. eResearch. Home. About. FAQ. Browse by Year. Browse by Name. Browse by School or Department. Browse by Theme. User Menu. Login. Create Account. Research News. Latest research news. Research Support. External Links. OpenDOAR. OAIster. SHERPA RoMEO. Paediatric Illness: The Role of Social Context in Childhood Cancer. Connolly, John F 2008 Paediatric Illness: The Role of Social Context in Childhood Cancer. The Irish Psychologist, 34 9. pp. 267-270. ISSN 07904789 Preview. PDF 918.pdf. Download 409kB. . Abstract The impact and interaction of paediatric illness on child, family and the broader social context represent key areas of concern for both researcher and practitioner. The prevalence of paediatric chronic illness has been estimated at as high as 19% Newacheck Stoddard, ...
http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/918/
*  Procter & Gamble OLAY REGENERIST UV LOT SPF-50 Size: 1.7 OZ - Compare Prices and Reviews on Procter
Procter Gamble OLAY REGENERIST UV LOT SPF-50 Size: 1.7 OZ - Compare Prices and Reviews on Procter Gamble 01332944000 Masks at PriceGrabber. Procter & Gamble OLAY REGENERIST UV LOT SPF-50 Size: 1.7 OZ MPN: 01332944000 Overview. Compare Prices. Product Details. Reviews. $26.34 - $30.47 Set Price Alert. Store Store Rating Price. See all-time ratings 86 Reviews. $26.34 Tax: $1.21 Shipping: $4.97. See all-time ratings 86 Reviews. $26.34 Tax: $1.21 Shipping: $4.97. See all-time ratings 12 Reviews. $30.47 Tax: None Shipping: $5.48. Compare All 3 Stores. Write a review. Write a review. Write a review. Write a review. Product Details Description SPF 50. Advanced anti-aging. Regenerist UV Defense Regenerating Lotion with SPF 50 UVA/UVB sunscreen combines powerful UVA/UVB SPF 50 sunscreen with our exclusive Peptide + B3 complex and Olay moisture to help protect from damaging UV rays while moisturizing and regenerating skin s appearance. skincare uses anti-aging. Reviews. Write a Review. Expert Reviews. Olay Regenerist U...
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*  American Sociological Association: 2007 Press ReleasePrint Friendly Version
... Printer Friendly Version Of American Sociological Association: 2007 Press Release http://www.asanet.org/press/20071213.cfm ASA Press Releases Contact: Jackie Cooper or Lee Herring E-mail: pubinfo@asanet.org Phone: 202 247-9871. Obese adults are admitted to the hospital more frequently and for more days than adults who are normal weight, finds a new study that looks at how being obese leads to a need for more health care services. The study also finds that duration of obesity—how long an adult has been obese—has a direct impact on length of hospitalization. “A somewhat surprising result in our study was the fact that the length of time a person has been obese makes a much bigger impact than how severe the obesity actually is.” The study appears in the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, a peer-reviewed scientific publication of the American Sociological Association. On average, obese adults had about 3.22 hospital stays in a 20-year period compared with 2.47 stays for the normal-w...
http://asanet.org/printpage.cfm?page_ID=251
*  .. Social Club for ASD kids .. Responses .. Categories .. Share this: .. Like this: .. Related
September 16, 2012 Social Club for ASD kids. Tags: Advice, Autism, social club, social interaction. By: myautisticmuslimchild on September 16, 2012 at 4:58 am Reply. By: myautisticmuslimchild on September 20, 2012 at 10:47 pm Reply. Allah bless you, and bless our kids. By: myautisticmuslimchild on September 25, 2012 at 1:58 am Reply. Hi I live in an area in england with one of the highest levels of autism in the uk we have lots of so called facilities and professionals but nothing in the way of treatment facilities, I was told after diagnosis that there is no cure, no way forward which I found pretty depressing, reading about your lack of even a social interaction group has made me feel even more strongly that we need as mothers to help our children ourselves and take treatment, therapies, and our children’s social needs into our own capable hands thanks you are an inspiration and your strength shines through I believe God in his infinite wisdom has blessed me with my autistic son he is a constant joy and has...
https://myautisticmuslimchild.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/social-club-for-asd-kids/
*  Voting to expel a group member
... Home. Help. Cart. Division 49 APA Website. Leadership. Early Career. Students. Publications. Membership. Awards. About. Home //. Division 49 //. Publications //. Newsletter // Voting to expel a group member. EMAIL. PRINT. The Group Psychologist. April 2012. IN THIS ISSUE Voting to expel a group member The author recalls a group intervention experience involving an individual who's outside behavior was in direct conflict with his group behavior, thus jeopardizing his true progress. By John Breeskin, PhD, ABPP. The event that I am writing about has happened to me three times in 50 years of running groups and, as far as I'm concerned, this is three times too many. I do wish, however, to provide guidance to my colleagues in terms of the issues involved in order to give them a systematic way of looking at this possible event. Eric, a mid-20s young man, was a member of my men's group. He sought our help in order to respectfully terminate a relationship that he felt was no longer viable. His soon-to-be ex-wife ...
http://apadivisions.org/division-49/publications/newsletter/group-psychologist/2012/04/voting-to-expel.aspx
*  Social disease
... redirect sexually transmitted infection...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_disease
*  92 Percent of American Babies Have a Social Networking Presence
......
http://gawker.com/5659122/92-percent-of-american-babies-have-a-social-networking-presence?tag=social-not-working
*  http://www.105.net/sezioni/657/105-night-express?from=social&redir=true
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http://105.net/sezioni/657/105-night-express?from=social&redir=true
*  Comments on How's Your Social Life?
MO Arthritis http://www.moarthritis.org/ 2013-08-27T23:34:19Z TypePad...
http://moarthritis.org/2013/08/hows-your-social-life/comments/atom.xml
*  Oppositional defiant disorder - Psychology Wiki
... Edit this Page. Oppositional defiant disorder Redirected from ODD. Edit. Oppositional defiant disorder. Oppositional defiant disorder is a psychiatric category listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders where it is decribed as an ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile, and defiant behavior toward authority figures that goes beyond the bounds of normal childhood behavior. Childhood Oppositional Defiant Disorder is strongly associated with later developing Conduct Disorder. There are a variety of approaches to the treatment of Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD. They could only find seven articles that mentioned Oppositional defiant disorder at all and none of them mentioned the selection of criteria or the cutoff point for ODD. Main article: Oppositional defiant disorder: Relapse prevention Main article: Oppositional defiant disorder: Prognosis. ↑ Barkley, R., 1997 Defiant Children: A Clinician's Manual for Assessment and Parent Training, NY: Guilford Press ↑ Barkley, R., Benton, ...
http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/ODD
*  Effective Child Therapy|Disruptive Behavior Problems (ODD & CD)
Effective Child Therapy|Disruptive Behavior Problems ODD CD. Main menu Welcome. About Us. Links. Contact Us. Privacy Policy. Site map. The Public. Watch a Free 15 Min Video for Parents. Symptoms Treatment Options. Fear, Worry, Anxiety. Anxiety Problems Disorders. Agoraphobia. Generalized Anxiety. Obsessions Compulsions. Panic. Posttraumatic Stress. Separation Anxiety. Social Phobia. Specific Phobia. Sadness, Hopelessness, Depression. Depression Related Disorders. Major Depressive Disorder. Dysthymic Disorder. Adjustment Disorder. Inattention Hyperactivity. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Rule Breaking, Defiance, Acting Out. Disruptive Behavior Problems. Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD. Conduct Disorder. Drug Alcohol Use. Substance Abuse Dependence. Eating Body Image Problems. Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa. Severe Mood Swings Bursts of Rage. Bipolar Disorder. Autism Related Disorders. Autism Spectrum Disorders. Self-injury/Self-harm. Weight Problems. What is Evidence-Base...
http://effectivechildtherapy.org/content/disruptive-behavior-problems-odd-cd
*  Disruptive Behavior Disorders - HealthyChildren.org
... Health Issues Conditions. ADHD. Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Emotional Problems > Disruptive Behavior Disorders Health Issues. Behaviors typical of disruptive behavior disorders can closely resemble ADHD—particularly where impulsivity and hyperactivity are involved—but ADHD, ODD, and CD are considered separate conditions that can occur independently. About one third of all children with ADHD have coexisting ODD, and up to one quarter have coexisting CD. A child with ADHD and a coexisting disruptive behavior disorder is likely to be similar to children with ADHD alone in terms of intelligence, medical history, and neurological development. But what distinguishes children with ODD and CD most from children with ADHD alone is their defiant, resistant, even in the case of CD aggressive, cruel, or delinquent, behavior. A child with family members with ADHD/ODD or ADHD/CD should be watched for ADHD/CD as well. Divorce, separation, substance abuse, parental criminal activity, or serious confl...
http://healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/pages/Disruptive-Behavior-Disorders.aspx
*  Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) | Hoagies' Gifted
Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD. Hoagies' Gifted. SUPPORT Hoagies' Page. Shop Hoagies'. Support Hoagies' Page. Donations Your donations help keep Hoagies' Gifted Education Page on-line. Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD "Children and adolescents with ODD will find the weakness in the family system and exploit it. These children and adolescents will try to exploit this. You have to take care of yourself in ways you would not have to if your child did not have ODD. Jim Chandler, Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD and Conduct Disorder CD in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment See also ... Misdiagnosis And Dual Diagnoses Of Gifted Children And Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger's, Depression, And Other Disorders. Six nationally prominent health care professionals describe ways parents and professionals can distinguish between gifted behaviors and pathological behaviors... Recommended for ODD kids Children with oppositional defiant disorder from American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry Oppo...
http://hoagiesgifted.org/oppositional.htm
*  NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens - Oppositional Defiant Disorder
... Adolescent Medicine Oppositional Defiant Disorder What is oppositional defiant disorder ODD. Oppositional defiant disorder ODD is a behavior disorder, usually diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by uncooperative, defiant, negativistic, irritable, and annoying behaviors toward parents, peers, teachers, and other authority figures. However, in children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder, these symptoms occur more frequently and interfere with learning, school adjustment, and, sometimes, with the adolescent's relationships with others. Further, oppositional defiant disorder often coexists with other mental health disorders, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, increasing the need for early diagnosis and treatment. Treatment for oppositional defiant disorder: Specific treatment for adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder will be determined by your adolescent's physician based on: your adolescent's age, ov...
http://nyhq.org/diw/Content.asp?PageID=DIW001629&language=Chinese
*  NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens - Oppositional Defiant Disorder
... Adolescent Medicine Oppositional Defiant Disorder What is oppositional defiant disorder ODD. Oppositional defiant disorder ODD is a behavior disorder, usually diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by uncooperative, defiant, negativistic, irritable, and annoying behaviors toward parents, peers, teachers, and other authority figures. However, in children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder, these symptoms occur more frequently and interfere with learning, school adjustment, and, sometimes, with the adolescent's relationships with others. Further, oppositional defiant disorder often coexists with other mental health disorders, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, increasing the need for early diagnosis and treatment. Treatment for oppositional defiant disorder: Specific treatment for adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder will be determined by your adolescent's physician based on: your adolescent's age, ov...
http://nyhq.org/diw/content.asp?pageid=P01629
*  Oppositional Defiant Disorder - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
... Patient Family Services. Oppositional defiant disorder ODD is a behavior disorder, usually diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by uncooperative, defiant, negativistic, irritable, and annoying behaviors toward parents, peers, teachers, and other authority figures. Behavior disorders are, by far, the most common reason for referrals to mental health services for children and adolescents. Most symptoms seen in children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder also occur at times in children without this disorder, especially around the ages or 2 or 3, or during the teenage years. However, in children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder, these symptoms occur more frequently and interfere with learning, school adjustment, and, sometimes, with the child's relationships with others. Further, oppositional defiant disorder often coexists with other mental health disorders, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,...
http://massgeneral.org/conditions/condition.aspx?id=329
*  CEBC » Topic › Disruptive Behavior Treatment Child Adolescent
Definition for Disruptive Behavior Treatment Child Adolescent : Disruptive Behavior Treatment Child Adolescent is defined as the treatment of youth with a diagnosis of a disruptive behavior disorder including Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD , Conduct Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD , or youth without a diagnosis who are exhibiting similar behaviors. detailed view Topics: Disruptive Behavior Treatment Child Adolescent , Substance Abuse Treatment Adolescent , Behavioral Management Programs for Adolescents in Child Welfare Youth, 12 to 17 years old, with possible substance abuse issues who are at risk of out-of-home placement due to antisocial or ... detailed view Topics: Disruptive Behavior Treatment Child Adolescent , Parent Training Programs Parents of children 2-18 years of age with disruptive behaviors such as conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and anti-social behaviors. detailed view Topics: Disruptive Behavior Treatment Child Adolescent , Substance Abuse Treatme...
http://cebc4cw.org/topic/disruptive-behavior-treatment-child-adolescent/
*  Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) - Mayo Clinic
Oppositional defiant disorder ODD - Mayo Clinic. Diseases and Conditions Oppositional defiant disorder ODD. Treatment of ODD involves therapy, training to help build positive family interactions and skills to manage behaviors, and possibly medications to treat related mental health conditions. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5, published by the American Psychiatric Association, lists criteria for diagnosing ODD. DSM-5 criteria for diagnosis of ODD include both emotional and behavioral symptoms. Many children with ODD also have other mental health conditions, such as:. Treating these other mental health conditions may help improve ODD symptoms. Does my child have oppositional defiant disorder. What else can my family and I do to help my child. Because ODD often occurs along with other behavioral or mental health problems, symptoms of ODD may be difficult to distinguish from those related to other problems. Treating oppositional defiant disorder generally involves several types of ...
http://mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/oppositional-defiant-disorder/basics/definition/con-20024559?p=1
*  Oppositional Defiant Disorder | Phoenix Children's Hospital
Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Phoenix Children's Hospital. Online Health Records. Children s Health Center. Medical Library. Online Health Records. The Emily Center Family Health Library Library Children s Health Center Conditions A-Z Symptom Checker and Care Guides Drug Interaction Checker Drug Reference Guide Drug Search by Physical Description Medical Records Medical Library Patient Portal. Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Most symptoms seen in children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder also occur at times in children without this disorder, especially around the ages or 2 or 3, or during the teenage years. However, in children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder, these symptoms occur more frequently and interfere with learning, school adjustment, and, sometimes, with the child's relationships with others. The symptoms of ODD may resemble other medical conditions or behavior problems. Further, oppositional defiant disorder often coexists with other mental health disorders, inc...
http://phoenixchildrens.org/health-information/encyclopedia/detail/90,P02573
*  Characteristics of children with juvenile bipolar disorder or disruptive behavior disorder
... s and negative mood: Can they be distinguished in the clinical setting. Home. About AACP. Winokur Award. Join AACP. Login. << Back. Characteristics of children with juvenile bipolar disorder or disruptive behavior disorders and negative mood: Can they be distinguished in the clinical setting. . . Professor of Psychology, Assumption College, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA BACKGROUND: Because of continuing controversy over distinguishing juvenile bipolar disorder JBD from disruptive behavior disorders DBDs in the clinical setting, we investigated whether referred children with a DBD and a negative mood component could be differentiated from those diagnosed with JBD. The distinction is important because treatments differ. METHODS: In this single-site sample, 96 children with non-attention-deficit/hyperactivity DBD and depression were compared with 27 JBD children and 187 psychiatric comparison children on measures assessing behavior, ...
http://aacp.com/Abstract.asp?AID=10842&issue=&page=C&UID=
*  Oppositional Defiant Disorder - American Family Physician
... For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education Web site. Information from Your Family Doctor Oppositional Defiant Disorder. See related article on oppositional defiant disorder. What is oppositional defiant disorder. Those who have it act negative, angry, and defiant much more often than other people their age. The disorder may run in families. Your doctor will ask about your child's symptoms, medical history, family history, and other emotional or behavioral problems. Children can learn better ways to manage their anger. Families can learn to communicate better with each other. Parents can also learn to manage their child's behavior and to use discipline effectively. How can I prevent this disorder. A few books for parents include: The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children, by Ross W. Your doctor The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry W...
http://aafp.org/afp/2008/1001/p867.html
*  Intense Anxiety and Odd symptoms
... Anxiety Forums, Blogs & Support Groups. Anxiety Zone. Help. Member Groups. Member Blogs. Anxiety Zone Forums, Blogs Support Groups. Intense Anxiety and Odd symptoms. Author Topic: Intense Anxiety and Odd symptoms Read 278 times. Posts: 48 Country:. Intense Anxiety and Odd symptoms on: March 19, 2014, 06:19:41 PM. And at times it feels my stomach is burning or if that doesnt happen my stomach rumbles and i have the urge to use the restroom. Sometimes i feel i want to barf but then like i suddenly dont want to barf or anything. The urine sample showed i was high in calcium and the doctor said that explained the kidney aches so she did a blood test and a week after she got it and she said it was normal nothing bad. Tweet Logged. Posts: 13722 Country:. Re: Intense Anxiety and Odd symptoms Reply #1 on: March 20, 2014, 06:47:59 AM. All your symptoms are normal for a person with anxiety. The burning within could simply be acid reflux. I think once you learn to accept that everything is from your anxiety and not...
http://anxietyzone.com/index.php/topic,85274.msg478174.html
*  Is Oppositional Defiant Disorder a Meaningful Diagnosis in A... : The Journal of Nervous and Ment
... al Disease. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Subscribe. Search Jobs. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Issues Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Home Currently selected. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. Collections. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Journal Info. About the Journal. Editorial Board. Advertising. Open Access. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Home. July 2007 - Volume 195 - Issue 7. Is Oppositional Defiant Disorder a Meaningful Diagnosis in A... Previous Abstract. Next ...
http://journals.lww.com/jonmd/Abstract/2007/07000/Is_Oppositional_Defiant_Disorder_a_Meaningful.8.aspx
*  Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) Tests and diagnosis - Mayo Clinic
Oppositional defiant disorder ODD Tests and diagnosis - Mayo Clinic. Diseases and Conditions Oppositional defiant disorder ODD. Treatment of ODD involves therapy, training to help build positive family interactions and skills to manage behaviors, and possibly medications to treat related mental health conditions. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5 , published by the American Psychiatric Association, lists criteria for diagnosing ODD. DSM-5 criteria for diagnosis of ODD include both emotional and behavioral symptoms. Many children with ODD also have other mental health conditions, such as:. Treating these other mental health conditions may help improve ODD symptoms. Does my child have oppositional defiant disorder. What else can my family and I do to help my child. Because ODD often occurs along with other behavioral or mental health problems, symptoms of ODD may be difficult to distinguish from those related to other problems. Treating oppositional defiant disorder generally invol...
http://mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/oppositional-defiant-disorder/basics/tests-diagnosis/con-20024559?p=1
*  Pixie Dust Healing: Oppositional Defiant Disorder
... Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD is a diagnosis attached to a certain set of behavioural symptoms most commonly seen in children although it can be present in adults as well. There are at least 7 homeopathic remedies that may be helpful for the symptoms of ODD. Bach Flower essences may also be helpful for Oppositional Defiant Behavior. Heather MacKenzie-Carey. Labels: opositional defiant disorder; homeopathic alternatives; bach flower essence therapy for O.D.D. August 28, 2012 at 8:42 PM Thank you for sharing this information. Reply Delete. Heather MacKenzie-Carey. September 2, 2012 at 10:43 AM I'm always happy to share. Reply Delete. Heather MacKenzie-Carey. Send me an email through my website www.pixiedusthealing.com or heather@pixiedusthealing.com if you want to try some Bach Flowers. July 3, 2013 at 11:20 AM Hello I have an 11 year old daughter that has a very diftecult time consentrating she has add and bipolar disorder so I have found on this site remieies that m...
http://pixiedusthealing.blogspot.com/2011/01/oppositional-deviant-disorder.html
*  Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) Lifestyle and home remedies - Mayo Clinic
Oppositional defiant disorder ODD Lifestyle and home remedies - Mayo Clinic. Diseases and Conditions Oppositional defiant disorder ODD. By Mayo Clinic Staff. Even the best-behaved children can be difficult and challenging at times. But if your child or teen has a frequent and persistent pattern of anger, irritability, arguing, defiance or vindictiveness toward you and other authority figures, he or she may have oppositional defiant disorder ODD. As a parent, you don't have to go it alone in trying to manage a child with ODD. Doctors, counselors and child development experts can help. Treatment of ODD involves therapy, training to help build positive family interactions and skills to manage behaviors, and possibly medications to treat related mental health conditions. Sometimes it's difficult to recognize the difference between a strong-willed or emotional child and one with oppositional defiant disorder. It's normal to exhibit oppositional behavior at certain stages of a child's development. Signs of ODD gene...
http://mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/oppositional-defiant-disorder/basics/lifestyle-home-remedies/CON-20024559?p=1
*  Effective Child Therapy|Fear, Worry, & Anxiety
Effective Child Therapy|Fear, Worry, Anxiety. Watch a Free 15 Min Video for Parents. Symptoms Treatment Options. Fear, Worry, Anxiety. Anxiety Problems Disorders. Agoraphobia. Generalized Anxiety. Obsessions Compulsions. Posttraumatic Stress. Separation Anxiety. Social Phobia. Specific Phobia. Depression Related Disorders. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Disruptive Behavior Problems. Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa. Bipolar Disorder. Autism Related Disorders. Autism Spectrum Disorders. Specific Treatments. What is CBT. What is Behavior Therapy. Other Treatments. EBP Options for Specific Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Anxiety General Symptoms. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Bipolar Disorder. Bulimia Nervosa. Disruptive Behavior Problems ODD CD. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PTSD. Social Phobia. Specific Phobia. Substance Abuse. More about Specific Treatments. CBT for Anxiety. CBT for Depression. CBT for Bipolar Disorder. CBT for Substance Abuse. CBT for Bulimia ...
http://effectivechildtherapy.org/content/fear-worry-anxiety
*  Effective Child Therapy|Contact Us
... Contact Us. Watch a Free 15 Min Video for Parents. Anxiety Problems Disorders. Posttraumatic Stress. Social Phobia. Specific Phobia. Depression Related Disorders. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Disruptive Behavior Problems. Eating Body Image Problems. Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa. Bipolar Disorder. Autism Related Disorders. Autism Spectrum Disorders. Therapy or Medication. How to Choose a Child Therapist. Specific Treatments. What is CBT. What is Behavior Therapy. Other Treatments. Watch a Free Keynote Address for Professionals. Treatment Training Workshops/Earn CE. EBP Options for Specific Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Bipolar Disorder. Bulimia Nervosa. Disruptive Behavior Problems ODD CD. Social Phobia. Specific Phobia. Substance Abuse. More about Specific Treatments. CBT for Anxiety. CBT for Depression. CBT for Bipolar Disorder. CBT for Substance Abuse. CBT for Bulimia Nervosa. Behavior Therapy for ADHD. Multisystemic...
http://effectivechildtherapy.org/content/contact-us
*  Disruptive Behavior Clinic
... UI Center on Depression and Resilience. Clinical Programs. EDUCATION Adult Residency Training. Adult and Child Psychiatry Neuroscience Research Track. Child and Adolescent Fellowship Training. Fellowship Training. Psychology Training. Women's Mental Health Training. Behavioral Health and Welfare Program. Center for Community-Based Children's Mental Health Research and Policy. Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Center on Mental Health Services Research and Policy. Mood and Anxiety Disorders Research Program. Mood Disorders and Suicide. Women’s Mental Health Research Program. Disruptive Behavior Clinic Disruptive Behavior Disorders School-Age Service DBS The DBD Program has a mission of designing, delivering, and developing state-of-the-art mental health interventions for children and families with externalizing disorders and co-morbid diagnoses. The School-Age Disruptive Behavior Disorders DBS Service provides evidence-based outpatient treatments to families of school-age youth who are diagnosed wit...
http://psych.uic.edu/mri-scan/78-about-us/481-disruptive-behavior-clinic
*  Disruptive Behavior Clinic
... UI Center on Depression and Resilience. Clinical Programs. EDUCATION Adult Residency Training. UI Center on Depression Resilience Launch October 21, 2014. Psychology Training. Women's Mental Health Training. Center for Community-Based Children's Mental Health Research and Policy. Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders. Center on Mental Health Services Research and Policy. Women’s Mental Health Research Program. Adult Residency Adult Residency. Psychology Training Psychology Training. Clinical Programs. UI CDR Launch UI CDR Launch. History Before there was a UIC College of Medicine, there was the College of Physicians and Surgeons, known colloquially as Read more. Institutes Learn about the institutes of Department of Psychiatry Read more. Values Statement EXCELLENCE EVERYWHERE — in research, education and clinical work Read more. Disruptive Behavior Clinic Disruptive Behavior Disorders School-Age Service DBS The DBD Program has a mission of designing, delivering, and developing state-of-the-art mental h...
http://psych.uic.edu/?id=481
*  Virtual Pediatric Hospital: CQQA: Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Home. About. FAQ. Reviews. Search. Virtual Pediatric Hospital: CQQA: Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Pediatrics Common Questions, Quick Answers Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD Peggy Nopoulos, M.D. Donna D'Alessandro, M.D. Lindsay Huth, B.A. Peer Review Status: Internally Reviewed Creation Date: April 2002 Last Revision Date: April 2002. Common Questions, Quick Answers. What is ODD. What causes it. Who can get it. What are the signs and symptoms. How is it treated. What can I do. What can my child do. How long does it last. When should I call the doctor. What is ODD. Oppositional Defiant Disorder, or ODD, is a behavior disorder. It affects children and adolescents. What causes it. The cause is unknown. There could be different reasons: May be inherited passed from mother or father to child. May be due to problems in the brain. How a family reacts to child's behavior and how a child is disciplined. Who can get it. It is a disorder of childhood and adolescence. Symptoms usually show up by age 8. It may be more ...
http://virtualpediatrichospital.org/patients/cqqa/odd.shtml
*  Oppositional Defiant Disorder - Doctors Hospital of Augusta | Augusta, GA
Oppositional Defiant Disorder - Doctors Hospital of Augusta. Augusta, GA. Careers. Search Doctors Hospital. Search Doctors Hospital GO. Find a Doctor. Services. Services Services A-Z. Cancer Care Center. Digestive Disease Center. Stroke Center. At Doctors Hospital, we treat the most important health concerns - yours. Classes & Events. Health To You. Medical Records. Patient Rights and Responsibilities and Patient Visitation Rights. Health Information. Health Information Health Library. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your health. For Professionals Careers. Medical Staff Services. Patient Transfer Center. This section is specifically for healthcare professionals, including physicians, mid-level providers, nurses, and other medical professionals. Oppositional Defiant Disorder Home. Health Information. Definition Causes Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention revision. Oppositional defiant disorder ODD is a behavior disorder in children and teens. The cause of...
http://doctors-hospital.net/your-health/?/2010812330/Oppositional-Defiant-Disorder
*  Effective Child Therapy|About Us
Anxiety Problems Disorders. Specific Phobia. Depression Related Disorders. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Disruptive Behavior Problems. Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa. Autism Related Disorders. Specific Treatments. What is Cognitive Therapy. EBP Options for Specific Disorders. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Bulimia Nervosa. Specific Phobia. More about Specific Treatments. CBT for Anxiety. CBT for Depression. CBT for Bipolar Disorder. CBT for Substance Abuse. CBT for Bulimia Nervosa. Behavior Therapy for ADHD. Multisystemic Therapy for Disruptive Behavior Problems Substance Abuse. Family Therapy for Eating Disorders. About Us The development and maintenance of this site has been funded by the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology SCCAP, a non-profit association that is a division of the American Psychological Association APA. The division promotes scientific inquiry, training, professional practice, and public policy in clinical child and adole...
http://effectivechildtherapy.org/content/about-us
*  Effective Child Therapy|Eating Disorders
... Main menu Welcome. About Us. Links. Contact Us. Privacy Policy. Site map. The Public. Watch a Free 15 Min Video for Parents. Symptoms Treatment Options. Fear, Worry, Anxiety. Anxiety Problems Disorders. Agoraphobia. Generalized Anxiety. Obsessions Compulsions. Panic. Posttraumatic Stress. Separation Anxiety. Social Phobia. Specific Phobia. Sadness, Hopelessness, Depression. Depression Related Disorders. Major Depressive Disorder. Dysthymic Disorder. Adjustment Disorder. Inattention Hyperactivity. Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD. Rule Breaking, Defiance, Acting Out. Disruptive Behavior Problems. Oppositional Defiant Disorder ODD. Conduct Disorder. Drug Alcohol Use. Substance Abuse Dependence. Eating Body Image Problems. Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa. Bulimia Nervosa. Severe Mood Swings Bursts of Rage. Bipolar Disorder. Autism Related Disorders. Autism Spectrum Disorders. Self-injury/Self-harm. Weight Problems. What is Evidence-Based Practice. What is Evidence-Based Practice. How is Rese...
http://effectivechildtherapy.org/content/eating-disorders
*  The Research & Training Center for Children's Mental Health
The Research Training Center for Children's Mental Health. Annual Conference. Research Agenda. Search. Conference Handouts. Click here to view handouts from 2010 - 2013 conferences. Under agenda, then archives. Click here to view past conference highlights. Presented at the 20th Annual Research Conference Practice Elements Utilized in the Treatment of Youth with Disruptive Behavior Disorder Demonstrating High and Low Levels of Success Download Handouts: 1.5mb pdf Session Number: 30 Room: Salon H Presenting: Roxanna Stumpf All Authors for this paper: Roxanna Stumpf; Ryan Tolman ; Charles Mueller; Bruce Chorpita; Eric Daleiden Presentation Type: paper presentation Synopsis: The current investigation examined practice elements utilized in the treatment of disruptive behavior youth demonstrating high and low levels of success. Analyses were conducted utilizing data from a sample of youth with a diagnosis of disruptive behavior disorder i.e., conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and disruptive behavior...
http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/rtcconference/handouts/default.cfm?appid=20109
*  Common Drugs and Medications to Treat Disruptive Behavior Disorder
... Diabetes. See what your medical symptoms could mean, and learn about possible conditions. Drugs Supplements. Find Information About: Drugs Supplements Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Find or Review a Drug. Taking Medications During Pregnancy. WebMD Pill Identifier Having trouble identifying your pills. Living Healthy. Diet, Food Fitness Diet Weight Management. News Experts. WebMD Communities Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. Get Answers WebMD Newsletters Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox. Follow the links to read common uses, side effects, dosage details and read user reviews for the drugs listed below. Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content. WebMD Daily Subscribe to the WebMD Daily, and you'll get today's top health news and trending topics, and the latest and best information from WebMD. Men's Healt...
http://webmd.com/drugs/condition-4850-Disruptive Behavior Disorder.aspx?diseaseid=4850&diseasename=Disruptive Behavior Disorder&source=0
*  .. A-Z Health Topics .. Oppositional Defiant Disorder .. Definition .. Causes .. Risk Factors .. Sy
A-Z Health Topics. Library to Search Health Library Health Day News Consumer Medication Information. Search Method By Title All Text. Language English Spanish. Return to Index by Alan R. Oppositional Defiant Disorder. ODD. Definition. Oppositional defiant disorder ODD is a behavior disorder in children and teens. Those with this disorder show negative, angry, and defiant behaviors much more often than most people of the same age. These behaviors begin to adversely affect the person’s relationships and ability to perform successfully in school, work, and family situations. Causes. The cause of ODD is unknown. Like other psychiatric disorders, ODD results from a combination of genetic, family, and social factors. Children with ODD may inherit chemical imbalances in the brain that make them more likely to have the disorder. Child's Brain. A chemical imbalance in the brain may be responsible for ODD. Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc. Risk Factors. ODD is more common in males. Other factors that may incre...
http://centegra.org/a-z-health-topics/?chunkid=11645&lang=English&db=hlt
*  Diagnostic criteria for 313.81 Oppositional Defiant Disorder | BehaveNet
Diagnostic criteria for 313.81 Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Disorders Drugs People Directories Terms Movies Blog. Diagnostic criteria for 313.81 Oppositional Defiant Disorder. A pattern of negativistic, hostile, and defiant behavior lasting at least 6 months, during which four or more of the following are present: 1 often loses temper 2 often argues with adults 3 often actively defies or refuses to comply with adults' requests or rules 4 often deliberately annoys people 5 often blames others for his or her mistakes or misbehavior 6 is often touchy or easily annoyed by others 7 is often angry and resentful 8 is often spiteful or vindictive Note: Consider a criterion met only if the behavior occurs more frequently than is typically observed in individuals of comparable age and developmental level. D Criteria are not met for Conduct Disorder , and, if the individual is age 18 years or older, criteria are not met for Antisocial Personality Disorder. A pattern of negativistic, hostile, and defiant behavior l...
http://behavenet.com/node/21490
*  Oppositional Defiant Disorder | Fawcett Memorial Hospital | Port Charlotte, FL
Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Fawcett Memorial Hospital. Services. Services View All Services. All Services. Stroke Center. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors Patients & Visitors. Classes & Events. H2U - health to you. Medical Records. Pay Bill Online. Volunteers. Health Info. Health Info Health Info. Health Library. Video Library. For Professionals. For Professionals For Professionals. Careers. For Employees. Hospital Affiliation Letters for Medical Center Staff. Patient Transfer Center. Volunteers. Community Involvement. Locations. Volunteers. Services. Services View All Services. All Services. Stroke Center. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors Classes & Events. H2U - health to you. Medical Records. Pay Bill Online. Volunteers. Health Info. Health Info Health Info. Health Library. Video Library. Fawcett Memorial Hospital Announces New Leadership Fawcett Memorial Hospital Announces New Leadership. Fawcett Memorial @fawcetthospital RT @TheHeartTruth: Struggling to make #exercising a habit. Definit...
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*  Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Drapetomania
... I tried to remove Oppositional defiant disorder from the See also as it is a real psychiatric diagnosis and it was immediately returned. contribs 00:23, 5 October 2007 UTC :*Sounds a 'bit' like a bad faith nom to me, but this user's edit history has me assuming good faith on the nom's part. contribs 00:26, 5 October 2007 UTC 'Comment' The relevance of the link to Oppositional defiant disorder is that drapetomania was a diagnosis to explain the tendency of enslaved Africans to escape. Oppositional defiant disorder is "a pattern of disobedient, hostile, and defiant behavior toward authority figures". Oppositional defiant disorder is a controversial disorder for labeling 'children' "as an ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile, and defiant behavior toward authority figures which supposedly goes beyond the bounds of normal childhood behavior". It is a controversial ICD-9 and ICD-10 diagnosis because some think it is just a way of psychiatrically labeling problem children. -- 'Mattisse' 00:54, 5 October 2007...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Drapetomania
*  Birth Control Behavioral Methods: Get the Facts
... Topics A-Z. Slideshow Pictures. Image Gallery. Medications. Medical Dictionary. Privacy. Site Map October 4, 2015 Like Us. sexual health center. sexual health a-z list. birth control behavioral methods article. Birth Control Behavioral Methods. Birth Control Slideshow Pictures. Birth Control Behavioral Methods Introduction. Continuous Abstinence. Birth Control Behavioral Methods Introduction. The practice of birth control or preventing pregnancy is as old as human existence. Continuous Abstinence. Continuous abstinence is completely refraining from sexual intercourse. Medical Editor: Bryan D Cowan, MD. Medical Editor: Lee P Shulman, MD. Page 1 of 7 Glossary Birth Control Behavioral Methods Topic Guide. Must Read Articles Related to Birth Control Behavioral Methods. Birth Control Barrier Methods The practice of birth control is as old as human existence. Birth Control FAQs The practice of birth control is as old as human existence. Birth Control Hormonal Methods "The pill" was introduced in the United Sta...
http://emedicinehealth.com/birth_control_behavioral_methods/article_em.htm

Genetics of social behavior: The genetics of social behavior is an area of research that attempts to address the question of the role that genes play in modulating the neural circuits in the brain which influence social behavior. Model genetic species, such as D.Nightmare: A nightmare is an unpleasant dream that can cause a strong emotional response from the mind, typically fear but also despair, anxiety and great sadness. The dream may contain situations of discomfort, psychological or physical terror.Benign neonatal sleep myoclonus: Benign neonatal sleep myoclonus (BNSM) is the occurrence of myoclonus (jerky movements) during sleep. It is not associated with seizures.ClonazepamExploding head syndrome: Exploding head syndrome (EHS) is a condition in which a person hears loud noises (such as a bomb exploding, a gunshot, or a cymbal crash) or experiences an explosive feeling when falling asleep or waking up. These noises have a sudden onset, are typically brief in duration, and are often jarring for the sufferer.NarcolepsyDog aggression: Dog aggression is a term used by dog owners and breeders to describe canine-to-canine antipathy. Aggression itself is usually defined by canine behaviorists as "the intent to do harm".PolysomnographySexual motivation and hormones: Sexual motivation is influenced by hormones such as testosterone, estrogen, progesterone, oxytocin, and vasopressin. In most mammalian species, sex hormones control the ability to engage in sexual behaviours.Gregor Wenning: Gregor K. Wenning (* born 21st March1964 in Horstmar, Westfalia) is a German Neurologist best known for his clinical and scientific work in Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian disorders, particularly multiple system atrophy (MSA).Dennis Walsh: Dennis Walsh (12 June 1933 – 1 June 2005) was an English astronomer, born into a poor family in Manchester. He was best known for his discovery in 1979 of the first example of a gravitational lens which he made while studying quasars found in the Jodrell Bank 966MHz survey.Olfactory sulcus: The medial orbital gyrus presents a well-marked antero-posterior sulcus, the olfactory sulcus, for the olfactory tract.Mental disorderCauses of Parkinson's disease: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Most people with PD have idiopathic Parkinson's disease (having no specific known cause).Professional DiscWet-tailOrg 25435: Org 25435 is a synthetic drug developed by Organon International, which acts as a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator, and produces sedative effects. It has been researched for use as an intravenous anesthetic agent, with positive results in initial trials, although negative side effects like hypotension and tachycardia, as well as unpredictable pharmacokinetics at higher doses, have meant it has ultimately not been adopted for medical use.CataplexyFocus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the field of special education. The editors-in-chief are Alisa K.Bipolar disorderFritz Heider: Fritz Heider (February 19, 1896 – January 2, 1988)American Psychologist., "Fritz Heider (1896 - 1988)".Social anxiety disorderCuriosity: Curiosity (from Latin curiosus "careful, diligent, curious," akin to cura "care") is a quality related to inquisitive thinking such as exploration, investigation, and learning, evident by observation in human and animal species. Curiosity is heavily associated with all aspects of human development, in which derives the process of learning and desire to acquire knowledge and skill.Jerry L. McLaughlin: Jerry L. McLaughlin is a researcher who has conducted research for 28 years studying plants looking for molecules that fight cancer at Purdue University's School of Pharmacy.Charles Ottley Groom NapierSchizophreniaAdult attention deficit hyperactivity disorderDutch profanity: Dutch profanity can be divided into several categories. Often, the words used in profanity by speakers of Dutch are based around various names for diseases.Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies: Anglo-Saxon royal genealogies refer collectively to the genealogies of the pre-Viking Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Britain. These trace the royal families through legendary kings and heroes and usually an eponymous ancestor of their clan, and in most cases converge on the god-hero of the Anglo-Saxon peoples, Woden.Oxytocin receptor: The oxytocin receptor, also known as OXTR, is a protein which functions as receptor for the hormone and neurotransmitter oxytocin. In humans, the oxytocin receptor is encoded by the OXTR gene which has been localized to human chromosome 3p25.Staphylococcus microti: Staphylococcus microti is a Gram positive, coagulase-negative member of the bacterial genus Staphylococcus consisting of clustered cocci. This species was originally isolated from viscera of the common vole, Microtus arvalis.Ernest StarlingAlejandro Rodriguez (psychiatrist): Alejandro Rodriguez (February 1918 – January 20, 2012) was a Venezuelan-American pediatrician and psychiatrist, known for his pioneering work in child psychiatry. He was the director of the division of child psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and conducted pivotal studies on autism and other developmental disorders in children.Invasion of Guadeloupe (1794): The Invasion of Guadeloupe was a British attempt in 1794 to take and hold the island of Guadeloupe in the West Indies during the French Revolutionary Wars. The British had negotiated with the French planters, Ignace-Joseph-Philippe de Perpignan and Louis de Curt, who wished to gain British protection, as the French Constitutional Assembly was passing a law abolishing slavery.History of psychopathy: Psychopathy, from psych (soul or mind) and pathy (suffering or disease), was coined by German psychiatrists in the 19th century and originally just meant what would today be called mental disorder, the study of which is still known as psychopathology. By the turn of the century 'psychopathic inferiority' referred to the type of mental disorder that might now be termed personality disorder, along with a wide variety of other conditions now otherwise classified.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Madrasi chess: Madrasi chess is a chess variant invented in 1979 by Abdul Jabbar Karwatkar which uses the conventional rules of chess with the addition that when a piece is attacked by a piece of the same type but opposite colour (for example, a black queen attacking a white queen) it is paralysed and becomes unable to move, capture or give check. Most of the time, two like pieces attack each other mutually, meaning they are both paralysed (en passant pawn captures are an exception to this, since the attack is not mutual.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Aging movement control: Normal aging movement control in humans is about the changes on the muscles, motor neurons, nerves, sensory functions, gait, fatigue, visual and manual responses, in men and women as they get older but who do not have neurological, muscular (atrophy, dystrophy...) or neuromuscular disorder.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.List of diseases of the honey bee: Diseases of the honey bee or abnormal hive conditions include:Nest (protein structural motif): The Nest is a type of protein structural motif. Peptide nests are small anion-binding molecular features of proteins and peptides.Substance-related disorderInterpersonal reflex: Interpersonal reflex is a term created by Timothy Leary and explained in the book, Interpersonal Diagnosis of Personality: A functional theory and methodology for personality evaluation (1957).Hypervigilance: Hypervigilance is an enhanced state of sensory sensitivity accompanied by an exaggerated intensity of behaviors whose purpose is to detect threats. Hypervigilance is also accompanied by a state of increased anxiety which can cause exhaustion.Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status is a neuropsychological assessment initially introduced in 1998. It consists of ten subtests which give five scores, one for each of the five domains tested (immediate memory, visuospatial/constructional, language, attention, delayed memory).Song control system: A song system, also known as a song control system (SCS), is a series of discrete brain nuclei involved in the production and learning of song in songbirds. It was first observed by Fernando Nottebohm in 1976 in a paper titled "Central control of song in the canary, Serinus canarius", published in the Journal of Comparative Neurology.Relationship Development Intervention: Relationship Development Intervention (RDI) is a trademarked proprietary treatment program for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), based on the belief that the development of dynamic intelligence is the key to improving the quality of life for individuals with autism. The program's core philosophy is that individuals with autism can participate in authentic emotional relationships if they are exposed to them in a gradual, systematic way.Postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Master of Advanced Studies in Interaction Design (MAIND), SUPSIEmotion and memory: Emotion can have a powerful response on humans and animals. Numerous studies have shown that the most vivid autobiographical memories tend to be of emotional events, which are likely to be recalled more often and with more clarity and detail than neutral events.Brendan Gahan: Brendan Gahan is an American social media marketer, public speaker, and YouTube marketing expert. He is the former Director of Social Media for the creative agency Mekanism where he was responsible for creating viral campaigns for clients including Pepsi, Virgin Mobile, Axe, and 20th Century Fox.Urban Services Department: Urban Services Department () was a government department in Hong Kong. It carried out the policies and managed the facilities of the former Urban Council.Claustrophobia: Claustrophobia is the fear of having no escape and being in closed or small space or room It is typically classified as an anxiety disorder and often results in panic attack, and can be the result of many situations or stimuli, including elevators crowded to capacity, windowless rooms, and even tight-necked clothing. The onset of claustrophobia has been attributed to many factors, including a reduction in the size of the amygdala, classical conditioning, or a genetic predisposition to fear small spaces.L-371,257Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Humanitarian crisis: A humanitarian crisis (or "humanitarian disaster") is defined as a singular event or a series of events that are threatening in terms of health, safety or well being of a community or large group of people."What Is a Humanitarian Crisis", Humanitarian Coalition, Retrieved on 6 May 2013.Parent structure: In IUPAC nomenclature, a parent structure, parent compound, parent name or simply parent is the denotation for a compound consisting of an unbranched chain of skeletal atoms (not necessarily carbon), or consisting of an unsubstituted monocyclic or polycyclic ring system.Vinnytsia Institute of Economics and Social Sciences: Vinnytsia Institute of Economics and Social Sciences – structural unit of Open International University of Human Development “Ukraine” (OIUHD “Ukraina”).

(1/292) Nutrition and health outcomes associated with food insecurity and hunger.

This paper explores how food insecurity and hunger relate to health and nutrition outcomes in food-rich countries such as the United States. It focuses on two subgroups of the population for whom data are available: women of childbearing age and school-age children. Special consideration is given to examining how food insecurity relates to these outcomes independently of socioeconomic status and poverty. In a population-based sample of women of childbearing age, the least severe level of food insecurity (household food insecurity) was correlated with higher body mass index (BMI), controlling for other available and known influences on obesity including income level. In low income school-age children from two large urban areas of the U.S., risk of hunger and hunger were associated with compromised psychosocial functioning, controlling for maternal education and estimated household income. The nutrition and health consequences of food insecurity comprise a potentially rich area for future, socially relevant research in the field of nutritional sciences.  (+info)

(2/292) Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist to screen for psychosocial problems in pediatric primary care: a national feasibility study.

BACKGROUND: Routine use of a brief psychosocial screening instrument has been proposed as a means of improving recognition, management, and referral of children's psychosocial morbidity in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of routine psychosocial screening using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) in pediatrics by using a brief version of the checklist in a large sample representative of the full range of pediatric practice settings in the United States and Canada. We evaluated large-scale screening and the performance of the PSC in detecting psychosocial problems by (1) determining whether the prevalence of psychosocial dysfunction identified by the PSC was consistent with findings in previous, smaller samples; (2) assessing whether the prevalence of positive PSC screening scores varied by population subgroups; and (3) determining whether the PSC was completed by a significant proportion of parents from all subgroups and settings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one thousand sixty-five children between the ages of 4 and 15 years were seen in 2 large primary care networks: the Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network and the Pediatric Research in Office Settings network, involving 395 pediatric and family practice clinicians in 44 states, Puerto Rico, and 4 Canadian provinces. Parents were asked to complete a brief questionnaire that included demographic information, history of mental health services, the 35-item PSC, and the number of pediatric visits within the past 6 months. RESULTS: The overall prevalence rates of psychosocial dysfunction as measured by the PSC in school-aged and preschool-aged pediatric outpatients (13% and 10%, respectively) were nearly identical to the rates that had been reported in several smaller samples (12%-14% among school-aged children and 7%-14% among preschoolers). Consistent with previous findings, children from low-income families were twice as likely to be scored as dysfunctional on the PSC than were children from higher-income families. Similarly, children from single-parent as opposed to those from 2-parent families and children with a past history of mental health services showed an elevated risk of psychosocial impairment. The current study was the first to demonstrate a 50% increase in risk of impairment for male children. The overall rate of completed forms was 97%, well within an acceptable range, and at least 94% of the parents in each sociodemographic subgroup completed the PSC form. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the PSC offers an approach to the recognition of psychosocial dysfunction that is sufficiently consistent across groups and locales to become part of comprehensive pediatric care in virtually all outpatient settings. In addition to its clinical utility, the consistency and widespread acceptability of the PSC make it well suited for the next generation of pediatric mental health services research, which can address whether earlier recognition of and intervention for psychosocial problems in pediatrics will lead to cost-effective outcomes.  (+info)

(3/292) An expansion of the peer-tutoring paradigm: cross-age peer tutoring of social skills among socially rejected boys.

We examined the effects of a cross-age peer-tutoring program on the social skills of 2 sixth-grade and 2 kindergarten socially rejected and isolated boys. Peer tutoring consisted of the older boys conducting social skills training with their younger tutees. The frequency of positive social interactions increased for all 4 boys, with maintenance of treatment gains following a 5-week interval.  (+info)

(4/292) Unemployment and foster home placements: estimating the net effect of provocation and inhibition.

OBJECTIVES: This study sought, first, to explain and reconcile the provocation and inhibition theories of the effect of rising unemployment on the incidence of antisocial behavior. Second, it tested the hypothesis, implied by the provocation and inhibition theories, that the relationship between unemployment and foster home placements forms an inverted "U." METHODS: The hypothesis was tested with data from California for 137 months beginning in February 1984. RESULTS: Findings showed that the hypothesis was supported. CONCLUSIONS: Rising joblessness increases the incidence of foster home placements among families that lose jobs or income. Levels of joblessness that threaten workers who remain employed, however, inhibit antisocial behavior and reduce the incidence of foster home placements. This means that accounting for the social costs of unemployment is more complicated than assumed under the provocation theory.  (+info)

(5/292) Behavioural phenotype of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

A postal questionnaire was used to study 49 individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (including both the classical and the mild forms) to ascertain behavioural phenotype. Ages ranged from early childhood to adulthood (mean age, 10.2 years; SD, 7.8) and the degree of mental retardation from borderline (10%), through mild (8%), moderate (18%), and severe (20%) to profound (43%). A wide variety of symptoms occurred frequently, notably hyperactivity (40%), self injury (44%), daily aggression (49%), and sleep disturbance (55%). These correlated closely with the presence of an autistic like syndrome and with the degree of mental retardation. The frequency and severity of disturbance, continuing beyond childhood, is important when planning the amount and duration of support required by parents.  (+info)

(6/292) The risks for late adolescence of early adolescent marijuana use.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of early adolescent marijuana use to late adolescent problem behaviors, drug-related attitudes, drug problems, and sibling and peer problem behavior. METHODS: African American (n = 627) and Puerto Rican (n = 555) youths completed questionnaires in their classrooms initially and were individually interviewed 5 years later. Logistic regression analysis estimated increases in the risk of behaviors or attitudes in late adolescence associated with more frequent marijuana use in early adolescence. RESULTS: Early adolescent marijuana use increased the risk in late adolescence of not graduating from high school; delinquency; having multiple sexual partners; not always using condoms; perceiving drugs as not harmful; having problems with cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana; and having more friends who exhibit deviant behavior. These relations were maintained with controls for age, sex, ethnicity, and, when available, earlier psychosocial measures. CONCLUSIONS: Early adolescent marijuana use is related to later adolescent problems that limit the acquisition of skills necessary for employment and heighten the risks of contracting HIV and abusing legal and illegal substances. Hence, assessments of and treatments for adolescent marijuana use need to be incorporated in clinical practice.  (+info)

(7/292) Student-school bonding and adolescent problem behavior.

Adolescent problem behavior, including substance use, school misconduct and delinquency, is a national concern. Implicit in the concept of middle school is the recognition that students who develop positive social bonds with their school are more likely to perform well academically, and refrain from misconduct and other antisocial behavior. However, little scientific attention has been given to the complex interactions between middle school students and the school environment. Prior to implementing a middle school problem behavior prevention program we conducted a survey in the seven middle schools in one US school district. Out of 4668 grade 6-8 students enrolled, 4263 (91.3%) completed the survey. Student-school bonding was positively correlated with school adjustment (r = 0.49) and perceived school climate (r = 0.77), but inversely correlated with problem behavior (r = -0.39 to -0.43). Problem behavior was significantly higher (P < 0.001) among males than females and among students in higher grades. Conversely, school bonding, climate and adjustment were significantly higher (P < 0.001) among females than males, but declined significantly from one grade to the next. The data support the conclusion that school bonding is associated with problem behavior. We describe the development of a multiple-component intervention in middle schools designed to increase student-school bonding and prevent problem behavior.  (+info)

(8/292) Disentangling the impact of low cognitive ability and inattention on social behavior and peer relationships. Conduct Problems Prevention Re search Group.

Examined the shared and unique contributions of low cognitive ability and inattention to the development of social behavior problems and peer relationships of children at the time of school entry. Kindergarten and first-grade assessments of cognitive ability, inattention and prosocial and aggressive behavior were collected for a multisite, normative sample. Sociometric assessments of peer relationships were collected at the end of first grade. Cognitive ability and inattention both contributed to the prediction of social behavior and peer relationships. Low cognitive ability was particularly predictive of prosocial skill deficits, and social behavior mediated the relation between cognitive ability and social preference. Inattention predicted both prosocial skill deficits and elevated aggressive-disruptive behavior problems. Behavior problems partially mediated the relation between inattention and social preference. Identified subgroups of children with elevated levels of inattention or low cognitive ability showed different patterns of peer problems, with low acceptance characteristic of the low cognitive ability (only) group and high dislike ratings characteristic of the inattentive and inattentive/low-ability group. Implications are discussed for the design of early intervention and prevention programs.  (+info)


How do you deal with social anxiety disorder?


I have social anxiety disorder; I was diagnosed about 3 years ago. I have tried medication and therapy, but I don't like how the medication makes me feel and I would like to find an alternative to therapy. How do you combat negative thoughts and face your fears in social situations? One negative thought in particular I am having difficulty with is the constant fear that my boyfriend is cheating on me. How do I get rid of this?
----------

Its hard to overcome... what meds have you been on? I have General Anexiety Disorder and sometimes it controls my life. There are times when I can't even leave my bedroom. Sometimes I go hysterical at work (so embarressing) and other times I'm able to calm myself down, but it's hard. I take xanax daily... i used to be on a "maintenance" drug - but I didn;t like it, so now I'm going to counsuling ... It's not making a huge difference yet, but I am learning how to cope and what to do when I feel I'm about to have a panic attack... Sometimes just learning new ways to cope really help. Hang in there. Just remember some of the negative thoughts and fears you have are irrational. He loves you and would never cheat on you. Just the fear of it happening is scary - analyze the situation. . . (Trust is the most important part of a relationship, you know that so have a little trust & faith) Hang in there doll.


How can I help someone with social anxiety disorder?


I think my best friend has social anxiety disorder, she hasn't been diagnosed with it, but I've been looking it up, because she acts so strange around other people, and the symptoms seem to match what she does.
Please can someone help me.. I don't know what I should do, or how I can help her to be normal In front of others. Please help, she means the world to me...
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Recognize that she can only be helped if she wants to be helped. She may not recognize that there is a problem.  First, I would suggest that you be willing to accept her as she is and not try to change her. If there really is a problem, then you may want to sit down and have a quiet chat with her about it. You would want to gently open the subject by mentioning that you notice this specific behavior and that it is not getting the results that she wants.  Find out what results she wants and then see if you can figure out what behavior will get that for her. Remember not to be accusatory but rather be supportive when you speak to her.


Can major depression be mistaking for psychopathic disorder?


My brother is a text book psychopath, so I am predisposed to write-off anti-social behavior as psychopathy. My father has exhibited the tall tale signs a of psychhopthic disorder for 17 years (the previous 16 years he was relativley normal behaving). He claims to have major depression, but I don't beleive him.
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I don't believe him either. Your father isn't a psychologist, is he?


How can you get over social anxiety disorder?


I've had social anxiety disorder for three years now and it gets worse everyday. I stopped going to school because the panic attacks and i couldan't handle being in large crowds.
I've lost all my friends since i've got it, and i've become depressed because i'm so lonely.
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First, get on some medication if you aren't already on some.  Second, talk to a counselor/professional.  Third, you need to make a conscious decision not to let your social anxiety disorder affect your life.


Who do you go to first for social anxiety disorder? How much does it cost or is it covered?


Where do you go to get help for social anxiety disorder? Do you go to the doctor or go to a psychologist or something like that? 

How much does it cost or is it covered by insurance ( the visit + medication) I'm 17 and i doubt my mom would want to pay for it.
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It all depends on your insurance. I had to go to the doctor first and get  a referral to go to a therapist. My insurance paid for a certain amount of visit a year, but each insurance policy is different. Also, you're assuming that your mom wouldn't want to pay. Talk to her, let her know what the problem is, let her know why you want to get help, you're assumption could be wrong. I started out telling my mom by making a list of "symptoms". I then, not telling my mom what this was about, asked her to answer yes or no about if the the things on the list describe me.


How do you treat social anxiety disorder?


I have had social anxiety disorder since I was 7. I'm 20 now and seems like its getting worse every single day. I don't have the money for therapy or medication so is there anything I can do by myself to help me?
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Try your local county mental health clinic, they opften can offer therapy for those that can't afford it. Or see if you can find a support group in your area, that might help.


How to overcome social anxiety disorder?


I am suffering from social anxiety disorder for a few years now. Tried a lot of varies treatments but very little of them used to help. Please give some advice on how to overcome social anxiety disorder.

Thanks
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Hi,

I had the same problem like you for a long time and I know what it is like. I don't like to take prescription medicines so I looked for other methods to try and get over this. What helped me to overcome social anxiety disorder was http://www.overcomesocialanxietydisorder.com/ I owe a lot to this method. It helped me when medicine would not.


How do I appoarch seeking help for social anxiety disorder?


Someone once told me that I have social anxiety disorder but I thought they were just messing with me. I recently looked it up and found that they might be right.  My only problem is I'm scared to ask my parents about seeking help. I'm scared that they won't believe me or that they will and then I'll have to talk to someone.  I don't know what to do or how to try and appoarch my parents..Can someone give me some advice?
So I appoarched my mom about it and just what I thought would happen happened. She thinks that everyone feels like that even her. That I don't have a problem. But I really think I do I was nervous just to tell her about it because I was afraid of what she would think..What else should I do?
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If you decide that you really want to get help, first do some research.  Get examples of how the symptoms apply to you, and how it is affecting your life.  Do you not want to participate in social activities?  Has it kept you from doing things you needed to do?  

If you don't want to go to your parents directly, try going to your school counselor first.  He or she might have resources to get you screened, and could provide an "expert" opinion and validation of your concerns.