Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.United StatesCardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Mortality, Premature: Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Perinatal Mortality: Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Fetal Mortality: Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.WalesKidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.EnglandOdds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.JapanSwedenChi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Respiratory Tract DiseasesBiological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.EuropeDeveloping Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Risk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Great BritainSocial Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.DenmarkWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.FinlandCerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.ItalyModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).BrazilAccidentsFetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Guinea-Bissau: A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and west of GUINEA. Its capital is Bissau.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Confounding Factors (Epidemiology): Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.ScotlandAir Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.CaliforniaMyocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.TaiwanForecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).NorwayRural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.GermanyOccupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.IndiaStillbirth: The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.IsraelLung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.CreatinineRussiaRespiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Weather: The state of the ATMOSPHERE over minutes to months.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Healthy Worker Effect: Phenomenon of workers' usually exhibiting overall death rates lower than those of the general population due to the fact that the severely ill and disabled are ordinarily excluded from employment.New YorkQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.MiningEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.

*  Harvard's Meat And Mortality Studies | Care2 Healthy Living
... increased heart disease mortality, and increased overall mortality. The studies were featured in my NutritionFacts.org video-of ... They found that red meat consumption was associated with living a significantly shorter life increased cancer mortality, ... "Meat Intake and Mortality: A Prospective Study of Over Half a Million People." What does the largest forward-looking study on ... they still found increased mortality risk, raising the question: what exactly is in the meat that is so ...
http://care2.com/greenliving/harvards-meat-and-mortality-studies.html
*  Study Links Air Pollution, Increased Infant-Mortality Rate - Education Week
See the '1995 Final Mortality Statistics,' from the Centers for Disease Control Web page, or the download it as a PDF file. ... Read 'Children at Risk from Ozone Air Pollution,' a pdf file that can be downloaded from a 1995 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly ... Recent studies have linked air pollution with increased adult-mortality rates, but this is believed to be the first major study ...
http://edweek.org/ew/articles/1997/06/18/38health.h16.html
*  60 Minutes/Vanity Fair Poll: Mortality - Page 8 - CBS News
These and other questions relating to human mortality ... 60 Minutes/Vanity Fair Poll: Mortality. Who would you be most ... willing to give your life for? These and other questions relating to human mortality ...
http://cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-vanity-fair-poll-mortality/8/
*  Premature mortality rate
Is Canada's premature mortality rate higher than those of its peer countries? Has Canada reduced the number of years lost due ... Putting premature mortality in context. Premature mortality is a measure of unfulfilled life expectancy. Because deaths of ... Has Canada reduced its premature mortality rate?. Canada's premature mortality rate has shown progressive improvement over the ... The premature mortality rate is calculated by multiplying the number of deaths occurring at each age by the number of
http://conferenceboard.ca/hcp/details/health/premature-mortality-rate.aspx
*  Mortality rate, infant (per 1,000 live births) | Data
Mortality rate, infant (per 1,000 live births) from The World Bank: Data ... Mortality rate, infant (per 1,000 live births). Estimates Developed by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation ...
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.IMRT.IN?display=map
*  Researchers air new theories about 1918 flu mortality | CIDRAP
CIDRAP News) - Experts who have studied the 1918 pandemic have long puzzled over why the mortality rate in young adults was so ... Mortality rates were lower in people who had previous exposure in their occupational settings, such as military clinics, the ... Jan 13, 2012 (CIDRAP News) - Experts who have studied the 1918 pandemic have long puzzled over why the mortality rate in young ... Factors that led to high mortality during the 1918 pandemic, such as commercial and social isolation, no longer ... ... Main Menu Main menu Home News Perspective Infectious Disease Topics Public Health Practices Ongoing Programs. BioWatch CCIVI CIDRAP Leadership Forum Ebola Vaccine Team B Influenza Training News Publishing Public Health Practices. ; Pandemic Influenza. Shanks and Brundage wrote that an analysis of who got sick and when they became ill provides some useful clues that might help explain the unusual mortality curve. In an editorial that accompanied the report, Dr David ...
http://cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2012/01/researchers-air-new-theories-about-1918-flu-mortality
*  World Health Organization report recognizes lower maternal mortality rate ::...
The World Health Organization's (WHO) report "Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2008" estimates that the annual maternal ... mortality rate is about 350,000 deaths and falling. Previously, the World Bank, the WHO and other U.N. agencies had set the ...
http://catholicnewsagency.com/news/world-health-organization-report-recognizes-lower-maternal-mortality-rate/
*  British Library EThOS: Factors influencing competition and mortality in...
Competition between Elminius modestus (Darwin) and Balanus balanoides (L) is considered to be an important issue in the invasion of British shores by E. modestus and in explaining the coexistence of both species in the intertidal barnacle niche. Competition is discussed by reference to the concept of ecological performance, which is a term describing all adaptations and physiological and behavioural attributes of each species. Much information on the biology of cirripedes already exists, but ...
http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.508066
*  Mortality risk greater for elderly women who... ( San Francisco Calif. - March...
Mortality,risk,greater,for,elderly,women,who,nap,daily,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters, ... ARDS mortality is unchanged since 1994. 5. Gene associated with reduced mortality from acute lung injury. 6. Mortality rates ... Cancer Mortality Increases With Cancer Cell Replikin Count. 9. Cancer incidence and mortality drops among American men and ... Dual treatment for stroke leads to improved recovery rates, reduced mortality. 11. Poverty Raises Mortality Risk With Non-
http://bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-1/Mortality-risk-greater-for-elderly-women-who-nap-daily-38556-1/
*  morbidity and mortality - News, Research and Analysis - The Conversation - page...
Browse morbidity and mortality news, research and analysis from The Conversation ... Articles on morbidity and mortality. Displaying all articles. Allowing nursing home residents to come and go as they wish may ...
http://theconversation.com/africa/topics/morbidity-and-mortality-30351
*  Mortality in young adults in England and Wales: the impact o... : AIDS
Mortality in young adults in England and Wales: the impact o... Top Cited Articles. Mortality in young adults in England and Wales: the impact o... Main outcome measures: Time trends in age-specific mortality rates among 15-44 year olds and years of potential life lost YPLL to age 65 associated with HIV infection and other important causes of death in young adults. Deaths from both suicide and HIV increased in men aged 15-44 years. In the United States, HIV infection was the most common cause of death among people aged 25-44 by 1993 and accounted for 19% of deaths in this age group in 1994. In this study, we have examined age-specific mortality rates 15-44 years and YPLL to age 65 associated with HIV infection compared with other causes of death in England and Wales from 1985 to 1996. Article Outline Results Between 1985 and 1996, 6842225 deaths were certified in England and Wales: 3339 516 in men and 3502709 in women. In the age band 45-64 years, only 0.9% of deaths in men and ...
http://journals.lww.com/aidsonline/Fulltext/1999/08200/Mortality_in_young_adults_in_England_and_Wales_.14.aspx
*  RePub, Erasmus University Repository: Educational inequalities in avoidable mortality
... in Europe. Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam. Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam /. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health /. Educational inequalities in avoidable mortality in Europe Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Volume 64 - Issue 10 p. Background The magnitude of educational inequalities in mortality avoidable by medical care in 16 European populations was compared, and the contribution of inequalities in avoidable mortality to educational inequalities in life expectancy in Europe was determined. Foreach country, the association between level of education and avoidable mortality was measured with the use of regression-based inequality indexes.Life table analysis was used to calculate the contributionof avoidable causes of death to inequalities in life expectancy between lower and higher educated groups. Results Educational inequalities in avoidable mortality were present in all countries of Europe and in all types of ...
http://repub.eur.nl/pub/27719/
*  Human Mortality Database
... Skip to Main Content. Log In/Create Account Find Analyze Data. Membership in ICPSR. Deposit Data. ICPSR Summer Program. Resources for Instructors. Data Management Curation. Find Analyze Data. Find Data. Search/Compare Variables. Find Publications. Resources for Students. Get Help. Table of Contents Top of page. Access Notes. Description. Human Mortality Database ICPSR 138 Principal Investigator s : Wilmoth, John R., University of California-Berkeley ;. Shkolnikov, Vladimir, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Summary: The Human Mortality Database HMD was created to provide detailed mortality and population data to researchers, students, journalists, policy analysts, and others interested in the history of human longevity. The project began as an outgrowth of earlier projects in the Department of Demography at the University of California, Berkeley, USA, and at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany. It is the work of two teams of researchers ...
http://icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/138?prefix=W&geography[0]=Wales&paging.startRow=1
*  Template:H5N1 Human Mortality
template h n human mortality template h n human mortality infobox title human mortality from h n image image h n human mortality png caption category neurology and psychiatry medicine templates
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:H5N1_Human_Mortality
*  Age-specific mortality rate
age specific mortality rate age specific mortality rate redirect life table
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age-specific_mortality_rate
*  Hermalin, Ofstedal: Nativity differentials in older age mortality in Taiwan: Do they exist and why?
Hermalin, Ofstedal: Nativity differentials in older age mortality in Taiwan: Do they exist and why. Overview. Search Projects. Browse Projects. Projects by Country. PSC Small Funds. People. Search All. U-M Researchers. Off-Campus Researchers. Training Faculty. Pubs. Overview. Search All Pubs. Browse All Pubs. Pubs by Country. Browse PSC Reports. PSC Report Series. News Events. Connect with PSC. PSC in the News. PSC Videos. Training. Overview. Faculty. Small Funds. Freedman. Hermalin. Mueller. Weinberg. Alumni Award. PSC Initiatives. Data. Overview. Restricted Data. Search. Info Services. Catalog. Catalog Help. Tools Resources. Journal Resources. Center Services. Center Overview. Ways to Give. Alumni Fund. Freedman Fund. Hermalin Fund. Mueller Fund. Weinberg Fund. PSC at 50. Publications. Search All. Browse All. Country. Browse PSC Pubs. PSC Report Series. PSC In The News. Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics Monday, Oct 5 at noon, 6050 ...
http://psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs/6384
*  Mortality rate
Other specific measures of mortality include: Crude death rate – the total number of deaths per year per 1,000 people. The crude death rate depends on the age and gender specific mortality rates and the age and gender distribution of the population. The number of deaths per 1,000 people can be higher in developed nations than in less-developed countries, despite a higher life expectancy in developed countries due to better standards of health. This happens because developed countries typically have a much higher proportion of older people, due to both lower birth rate s and lower mortality rates. Maternal mortality ratio – the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in same time period. Maternal mortality rate – the number of maternal deaths per 1,000 women of reproductive age in the population generally defined as 15–44 years of age. ISBN 0-521-81099-X Age-specific mortality rate ASMR – the total number of deaths per year per 1,000 people of a given age ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_rate
*  File:H5N1 Human Mortality.png
file h n human mortality png file h n human mortality png summary chart of the rate of human mortality for h n since january licensing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:H5N1_Human_Mortality.png
*  PLOS Medicine: Correction: The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-County Mor
PLOS Medicine: Correction: The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-County Mortality Disparities in the United States. PLOS Medicine. Correction: The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-County Mortality Disparities in the United States. Correction: The Reversal of Fortunes: Trends in County Mortality and Cross-County Mortality Disparities in the United States Majid Ezzati, Ari B Friedman, Sandeep C Kulkarni, Christopher J. Ezzati M, Friedman AB, Kulkarni SC, Murray CJL 2008 The reversal of fortunes: Trends in county mortality and cross-county mortality disparities in the United States. In the Methods section under the heading Effects of Cross-County Migration on Life Expectancy Change, “country” should be replaced by “county” in the following sentence:. Change in Probability of Dying in Specific Age Ranges between 1961 and 1983 and between 1983 and 1999, with Counties Grouped on the Basis of the Level of ...
http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0050119
*  To what extent do rising mortality inequalities by education and marital status attenuate the genera
... l mortality decline. Shkolnikov Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. Andreev Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. Jdanov Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. Domantas Jasilionis Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany. Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2009-018. HTML HTML with abstract plain text plain text with abstract BibTeX RIS EndNote, RefMan, ProCite ReDIF JSON in new window. References listed on IDEAS Please report citation or reference errors to, or, if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.: as HTML HTML with abstract plain text plain text with abstract BibTeX RIS EndNote, RefMan, ProCite ReDIF JSON in new window Koskinen, Seppo & Martelin, Tuija, 1994. " Educational differences ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/dem/wpaper/wp-2009-018.html
*  Work-Related Lung Disease Surveillance System (eWoRLD): Appendix | CDC/NIOSH
CDC/NIOSH. CDC Home. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health NIOSH. Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area 5 Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area 6 1968 Present. Yakutat Census Area Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area in part 1994 Present. 2 Mortality data from the Bristol Bay Borough included mortality data from the Dillingham Census Area and the Lake and Peninsula Borough from 1968 1981. 3 Mortality data from the Dillingham Census Area included mortality data from the Lake and Peninsula Borough from 1982 1993. 4 Kobuk Census Area included the former Kobuk District and the former Kobuk Borough. 5 Mortality data from the Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area included mortality data from the Yakutat Census Area from 1968 1993. 6 Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area included the former Skagway-Yakutat District. 7 Mortality data from the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area included mortality data from the Denali Borough from 1968 1993. 8 Mortality data ...
http://www2.cdc.gov/drds/WorldReportData/html/CountyEquivalents.asp
*  Mortality
... is the state of being mortal or susceptible to death the opposite of immortality mortality may also refer to mortality book a collection of essays by anglo american writer christopher hitchens mortality computability theory a property of a turing machine if it halts when run on any starting configuration mortality rate a measure of the number of deaths in a given population mortality drag a negative impact that is experienced when an annuity purchase is delayed mortality differential attrition an error in the internal validity of a scientific study mortality a short lived thrash metal band from sydney australia that was related to the band cryogenic band see also case fatality rate the proportion of deaths within a designated population of people with a medical condition cause of death mortality displacement a forward temporal shift in the rate of mortality mortality salience awareness of one s eventual death mortal ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality
*  Tomoko Tagawa, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center - ResearchGate
... Tomoko Tagawa. Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, United States. Are you Tomoko Tagawa. Differences in Cause-Specific Mortality Between Latino and White Adults. Mitchell D Wong Tomoko Tagawa. Hsin-Ju Hsieh. ABSTRACT: Understanding differences in cause-specific mortality between Latinos and whites is important for targeting future public health interventions and research aimed at eliminating health disparities. We sought to determine the contribution of specific causes of death to Latino-white differences in mortality. Outcomes were years of potential life lost before age 75 from specific causes of death and age-specific mortality rate ratios for Latinos compared with whites. Latinos had higher mortality rates than whites before age 45 and similar mortality rates at older ages. Latino women lost 315 95% confidence interval, 229-2423 more years of potential life per 1000 persons before the age of 75 than white women and Latino men lost 595 95% CI, ...
http://researchgate.net/researcher/36767338_Tomoko_Tagawa
*  Intercensal Mortality Rates by NS-SEC, 2001-2010 - ONS
... Skip to content. Careers at ONS. Accessibility. Default colour scheme. Dyslexia scheme. High visibility scheme. Banner Search Search. Search. Home. Browse by theme. Publications. Data. Release calendar. Guidance and methodology. Media centre. About ONS. Print friendly. You are here: Home Publications Intercensal Mortality Rates by NS-SEC, 2001-2010. Statistical bulletin: Intercensal Mortality Rates by NS-SEC, 2001-2010. Part of Health Inequalities, Intercensal mortality rates by NS-SEC 2001-2010 Release. Released: 24 April 2012. Download PDF. Contents. Key Findings. Summary. Policy Context and Use. Methods. Results. Comparison of Male and Female Results. Conclusion. Additional Information. References. Background notes. Statistical contacts. Key Findings. For men, there was a mostly steady decrease in mortality rates between 2001 and 2010 for each class. For women, there was a decrease in mortality rates between 2001 and 2010 for most classes. Over the period 2001–2010, ...
http://ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/health-ineq/health-inequalities/intercensal-mortality-rates-by-ns-sec-2001-2010/stb-mortality-ns-sec-2001-2010.html?format=contrast
*  Lee–Carter model
... 'The Lee–Carter model' is a numerical algorithm used in mortality forecasting and life expectancy forecasting. http://www.soa.org/library/journals/north-american-actuarial-journal/2000/january/naaj0001 5.pdf The input to the model is a matrix of age specific mortality rates ordered monotonically by time, usually with ages in columns and years in rows. The model uses the singular value decomposition SVD to find a univariate time series vector "k t " that captures 80–90% of the mortality trend here the subscript "t" refers to time, a vector "b x " that describes the amount of mortality change at a given age for a unit of yearly total mortality change here the subscript "x" refers to age, and a scaling constant referred to here as s 1 but unnamed in the literature. Before being input to the SVD, age specific mortality rates are transformed into "a x,t ", by taking their logarithms, and then centering them by subtracting their age-specific means calculated over ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee–Carter_model
*  eTalk : Online Mortality Risk Tool for Type 2 Diabetes
... Logging In. Email:. Password:. Remember Me. Forgot Password. Sign Up. Connect w/Facebook. Home. Lecture Hall. eTalk. eZines. About Us. More ▼. Classifieds. Mentor LMS. Contact Us. Important Links. Sponsors. Help & Support. back to the eTalk list. previous topic. Next topic. Print. Subscribe. Share. Micki Hall CDE,LD,MS,RD. posted: May 21st, 2013 @ 4:27pm. Online Mortality Risk Tool for Type 2 Diabetes keywords:. mortality, mortality risk tool, type 2 diabetes, risk. Section: General Diabetes. By plugging in age, BMI, HDL, LDL, TG, Diastolic Blood Pressure, and Urine-albumin-to-creatinine ratio as well as Yes/No to questions about antihypertensive agents and insulin therapy, you can predict a 2 year mortality risk in people with diabetes using this Gargano Mortality Risk Score. Online mortality risk calculator : http://www.operapadrepio.it/rcalc/rcalc.php It is simple, free, and validated. It is a web based risk calculator. The calculator stratifies patients ...
https://presentdiabetes.com/etalk/index.php?topicid=7912
*  Definitions - Data and Reports- Clark County Washington
Age-adjusted mortality rate - A mortality rate statistically modified to eliminate the effect of different age distributions in the different populations. Age-specific mortality rate - A mortality rate limited to a particular age group. The numerator is the number of deaths in that age group; the denominator is the number of persons in that age group in the population. Confidence interval - A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable. The specified probability is called the confidence level, and the end points of the confidence interval are called the confidence limits. Confidence intervals can be used to approximate statistical significance. The denominator is the population at risk; the numerator is the number of new cases occurring during a given time period. Mortality rate - A measure of the frequency of occurrence of death in a defined population ...
http://clark.wa.gov/public-health/reports/definitions.html
*  Risk adjusted mortality rate
... multiple issues the risk adjusted mortality rate ramr is a mortality rate that is adjusted for predicted risk of death it is usually utilized to observe and or compare the performance of certain institution s or person s e g hospital s or surgeon s it can be found as ramr observed mortality rate predicted mortality rate overall weighted mortality rate in medical science ramr could be a predictor of mortality that takes into account the predicted risk for a group of patient s for example for a group of patients first we need to find the observed mortality rates for all the hospitals of interest then we can build construct a model or use an existing model to predict mortality rates for each of the hospitals it is expected that the number of patients in each hospital will be different and hence we need an overall weighted mortality rate for all these hospitals once we have the above three rates then we can utilize the above formula to find the ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risk_adjusted_mortality_rate
*  Evaluating the goodness of fit of stochastic mortality models
... Dowd, Kevin Cairns, Andrew J.G. Blake, David Coughlan, Guy D. Registered author s : David Blake. The models considered are: Lee and Carter's 1992 one-factor model, a version of Renshaw and Haberman's 2006 extension of the Lee-Carter model to allow for a cohort-effect, the age-period-cohort model, which is a simplified version of the Renshaw-Haberman model, the 2006 Cairns-Blake-Dowd two-factor model and two generalized versions of the latter that allow for a cohort-effect. HTML HTML with abstract plain text plain text with abstract BibTeX RIS EndNote, RefMan, ProCite ReDIF JSON in new window. " Lee-Carter mortality forecasting: a multi-country comparison of variants and extensions," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 13/06, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics. " Modeling longevity risks using a principal component approach: A comparison with existing stochastic mortality models," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. ...
https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/insuma/v47y2010i3p255-265.html
*  New biomarker test accurately estimates mortality risk in patients with septicemia
... . Home. Thought Leaders Series. Insights from Industry Series. MediKnowledge Series. Research White Papers. News Feed. News A-Z. Health A-Z. Drugs A-Z. Clinical Diagnostics. Life Science Laboratory. Consumer Products. About. Meet the Team. Terms and Conditions. Medical News 'Tweets'. LIFE SCIENCES MEDICINE. October 6, 2015. Other search tools: Drugs. Health. News. Newsletters. Contact Us. Advertisement. Trending Stories Brain health: how can you reduce cognitive decline. An interview with Heather Snyder, Ph.D. CHOP scientist says that mitochondria play central role in human evolution, disease. Neuroscientists reveal the brain malady responsible for tinnitus, chronic pain. Study explores relationship between mental health and parenting. EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial demonstrates superiority of Jardiance in T2D patients at risk for CV events. Unique molecule can bind HIV-infected cells to killer T cells. Latest News Anti-coagulant medications quickly resolve blood clots that could impair valve motion. High ...
http://news-medical.net/news/20140327/New-biomarker-test-accurately-estimates-mortality-risk-in-patients-with-septicemia.aspx
*  Age-standardized mortality rate
age standardized mortality rate age standardized mortality rate redirect age adjustment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age-standardized_mortality_rate
*  Age-standardized mortality rates
age standardized mortality rates age standardized mortality rates redirect age adjustment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age-standardized_mortality_rates
*  A simple model of mortality trends aiming at universality: Lee Carter + Cohort
... Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/. A simple model of mortality trends aiming at universality: Lee Carter + Cohort. HTML HTML with abstract plain text plain text with abstract BibTeX RIS EndNote, RefMan, ProCite ReDIF JSON in new window. Keywords: This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports : NEP-AGE-2010-03-20 Economics of Ageing NEP-ALL-2010-03-20 All new papers NEP-FOR-2010-03-20 Forecasting NEP-HEA-2010-03-20 Health Economics. References listed on IDEAS Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile , click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.: as HTML HTML with abstract plain text plain text with abstract BibTeX RIS EndNote, RefMan, ProCite ReDIF JSON in new window Renshaw, A.E. " A cohort-based extension to the Lee-Carter model for mortality reduction factors ," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics , Elsevier, vol. " Mortality density forecasts: ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/arx/papers/1003.1802.html
*  Area compatibility factor
... in survival analysis the area compatibility factor f is used in indirect standardisation of population mortality rate s f frac sum x se x t c sm x t sum x se x t c left frac sum xe x t c sm x t sum x e x t c right where se x t c is the standardised central exposed to risk from age x to x t for the standard population e x t c is the central exposed to risk from age x to x t for the population under study and sm x t is the mortality rate in the standard population for ages x to x t the expression can be thought of as the crude mortality rate for the standard population divided by what the crude mortality rate is for the region being studied assuming the mortality rates are the same as for the standard population f is then multiplied by the crude mortality rate to arrive at the indirectly standardised mortality rate references category actuarial science category demography category epidemiology
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_compatibility_factor
*  Neuroblastoma Screening - National Cancer Institute
Cancer Statistics Causes and Prevention Risk Factors The Genetics of Cancer Cancer Prevention Overview Cancer Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research Cancer Screening Cancer Screening Overview Cancer Screening Overview–for health professionals Screening Tests Research Diagnosis and Staging Symptoms Diagnosis Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information for Patients and Caregivers A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine CAM Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life For Family & Friends Survivorship Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Advanced Cancer Choices for Care Talking about Advanced Cancer Coping with Your Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer and Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care ...
http://cancer.gov/types/neuroblastoma/hp/neuroblastoma-screening-pdq
*  Introduction to the Special Collection of papers on "Determinants of diverging trends in mortality"
Most recent similar articles in Demographic Research A summary of Special Collection 2: Determinants of Diverging Trends in Mortality Volume 10 - Article 12 Keywords: decline, mortality, mortality analysis Measuring the compression of mortality Volume 3 - Article 6 Keywords: mortality, mortality analysis The 1918 influenza pandemic and subsequent birth deficit in Japan Volume 33 - Article 11 Keywords: mortality The force of mortality by life lived is the force of increment by life left in stationary populations Volume 32 - Article 29 Keywords: mortality Divergence without decoupling: Male and female life expectancy usually co-move Volume 31 - Article 51 Keywords: mortality.
http://demographic-research.org/special/2/1/default.htm
*  Body weight and mortality among women.
... These women were 30 to 55 years of age and free of known cardiovascular disease and cancer in 1976. RESULTS: In analyses adjusted only for age, we observed a J-shaped relation between body-mass index and overall mortality. When women who had never smoked were examined separately, no increase in risk was observed among the leaner women, and a more direct relation between weight and mortality emerged P for trend 0.001. In multivariate analyses of women who had never smoked and had recently had stable weight, in which the first four years of follow-up were excluded, the relative risks of death from all causes for increasing categories of body-mass index were as follows: body-mass index 19.0 the reference category , relative risk = 1.0; 19.0 to 21.9, relative risk = 1.2; 22.0 to 24.9, relative risk = 1.2; 25.0 to 26.9, relative risk = 1.3; 27.0 to 28.9, relative risk = 1.6; 29.0 to 31.9, relative risk = 2.1; and or = 32.0, relative risk = 2.2 P for trend 0.001. Among women with a body-mass ...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Body-weight-mortality-among-women/7637744.html
*  HMDget (deprecated) - Tim Riffe Personal
hmdget deprecated tim riffe personal tim riffe personal search this site navigation right now demog blog about me r code package downloads graph gallery lexissurface lexissurface package plotlexistriangles lexiscolorreftable lexislegend interpolatelexistriangles dxprop interpolatelexistriangles simple interpolatelexistriangles loess interpolatelexistriangles mortalitysmooth decomphoriuchi decomphoriuchi package decompcontinuous decompcontinuousorig r r vec rates rates lexisdiagram lexisdiagram package lexis thighlight hmdget deprecated hmdget package hmdget lifetable lotka lotka package rmomentn meangeneration lotkaranalytic lotkarcoale lotkaroptim r decomp r decompkitagawa plot r decomp plot r decompkitagawa summary r decomp summary r decompkitagawa pyramid ratesketch ratesketch package ratesketch curriculum vitae recent site activity schoen s del a very fine index if there ever was one edited by tim riffe attachment from tim riffe tic tocs up toc ticks down relativized averaged attachment from tim ...
https://sites.google.com/site/timriffepersonal/r-code/hmdget
*  ecology - Survivorship Curves: Type II curve mortality rate is not constant? - Biology Stack Exchang
ecology - Survivorship Curves: Type II curve mortality rate is not constant. - Biology Stack Exchange. Biology. Biology Meta. more stack exchange communities. Stack Exchange. sign up log in tour. Help Center Detailed answers to any questions you might have. Biology Questions. Biology Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for biology researchers, academics, and students. Survivorship Curves: Type II curve mortality rate is not constant. In graphs of survivorship curves, I'm seeing that the Type II curves are straight lines, and the supplementary text says that the mortality rate is constant i.e. However, it's also clearly stated that the y-axis is a logarithmic scale, which means that the original Type II curve is exponential: $$\ln y=-rx+b$$ $$y=Ae {-rx}$$ This implies that the real mortality rate is not constant, but changes as $$y'=-Ar e {-rx} $$ How are we defining the word rate, anyway. $r$ is the individual mortality rate per time step. Survivorship curves ...
http://biology.stackexchange.com/questions/10551/survivorship-curves-type-ii-curve-mortality-rate-is-not-constant/10555
*  Mortality forecasting
... refers to the art and science of determining likely future mortality rates it is especially important in rich countries with a high proportion of aged people since aged populations are expensive in terms of pensions both public and private it is a major topic in ageing studies see also lee carter model life expectancy actuarial science category actuarial science
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_forecasting
*  Mortality under age 5
mortality under age mortality under age redirect child mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_under_age_5
*  RE: st: AGE at event occurrence as the time variable in mortality analys
... israther than time between entry into follow up an event occurrence. statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu. RE: st: AGE at event occurrence as the time variable in mortality analysisrather than time between entry into follow up an event occurrence. Cox works on the rank order of the survival times, not the survival times themselves. If you have the date of birth dob, the date of entry denter into the study and the date of exit dexit, either death or censoring date, you could try something like this: stset dexit, enter denter scale 365.25 failure died id idnum stsplit agegrp, at 0 5 100 after dob The scale option will calculate the follow-up time in years and the id option identifies each person and is needed for the stplit. From: owner-statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu On Behalf Of uri goldbourt Sent: Monday, 8 September 2008 5:51 AM To: statalist@hsphsun2.harvard.edu Subject: RE: st: AGE at event occurrence as the time variable in mortality analysisrather than time between entry into follow up an ...
http://stata.com/statalist/archive/2008-09/msg00272.html
*  Trends and socioeconomic gradients in adult mortality around the developing world
... Home. Site Map. Index. FAQs. Contact Us. About Countries Data Research Learning News Projects Operations Publications Topics. Search. Research All. Home Data & Research Research Author Profile Report Details. . Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/X29UZV96S0. Home. Site Map. Index. FAQs. Contact Us. Search. RSS. 2015 The World Bank Group, All Rights Reserved. Legal.
http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&piPK=64165421&theSitePK=469382&menuPK=64216926&entityID=000158349_20110630104028
*  ICD-10 Chapters V, W, X, and Y: External causes of morbidity and mortality
icd chapters v w x and y external causes of morbidity and mortality icd chapters v w x and y external causes of morbidity and mortality redirect icd chapter xx external causes of morbidity and mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICD-10_Chapters_V,_W,_X,_and_Y:_External_causes_of_morbidity_and_mortality
*  Mortality (computability theory)
mortality computability theory mortality computability theory in computability theory the mortality problem is a decision problem which can be stated as follows given a turing machine decide whether it halts when run on any configuration not necessarily a starting one in the statement above the configuration is a pair where q is one of the machine s states not necessarily its initial state and w is an infinite sequence of symbols representing the initial content of the tape note that while we usually assume that in the starting configuration all but finitely many cells on the tape are blanks in the mortality problem the tape can have arbitrary content including infinitely many non blank symbols written on it philip k hooper proved in that the mortality problem is undecidable however it can be shown that the set of turing machines which are mortal i e halt on every starting configuration is recursively enumerable category theory of computation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_(computability_theory)
*  Mortality ratio
... redirect standardized mortality ratio
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_ratio
*  Standardised mortality ratio
... redirect standardized mortality ratio
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standardised_mortality_ratio
*  Standardized Mortality Ratio
... redirect standardized mortality ratio
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standardized_Mortality_Ratio
*  Force of mortality
... in actuarial science force of mortality represents the instantaneous rate of mortality at a certain age measured on an annualized basis it is identical in concept to failure rate also called hazard function in reliability theory motivation and definition examples see also references external links motivation and definition in a life table we consider the probability of a person dying from age x to x called q x in the continuous case we could also consider the conditional probability of a person who has attained age x dying between ages x and x δx which is p x delta x p x
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_of_mortality
*  Late-life mortality plateau
late life mortality plateau late life mortality plateau redirect late life mortality deceleration late life mortality plateau category actuarial science category ageing category gerontology
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late-life_mortality_plateau
*  Case-fatality rate of H5N1
case fatality rate of h n case fatality rate of h n redirect human mortality from h n
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Case-fatality_rate_of_H5N1
*  Standardised mortality rate
... redirect standardized mortality ratio
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standardised_mortality_rate
*  Rate of mortality
... redirect mortality rate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rate_of_mortality
*  Tables of mortality
... redirect bills of mortality registrar general returns
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tables_of_mortality
*  Morbidity & Mortality
morbidity mortality morbidity mortality redirect morbidity and mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morbidity_&_Mortality
*  Morbidity and Mortality
... redirect morbidity and mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morbidity_and_Mortality
*  A Tale of Old Mortality
... redirect old mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Tale_of_Old_Mortality
*  The Tale of Old Mortality
... redirect old mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tale_of_Old_Mortality
*  List of diseases by mortality rate
... redirect list of human disease case fatality rates
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_diseases_by_mortality_rate
*  Mortality rates arising out of the European colonization of the Americas
... redirect population history of indigenous peoples of the americas
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_rates_arising_out_of_the_European_colonization_of_the_Americas
*  1. Auld Mortality - Doctor Who - Unbound - Big Finish
auld mortality doctor who unbound big finish auld mortality please note if the video does not play this could mean that you do not have adobe flash player installed download it here
http://bigfinish.com/releases/popout/auld-mortality-362
*  Mortality (band)
mortality band mortality band redirect cryogenic band
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_(band)
*  Mortality of the soul
... redirect christian mortalism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mortality_of_the_soul
*  Statins Use Linked To Reduction In Cancer Mortality
... false
http://forbes.com/sites/larryhusten/2012/11/07/statins-use-linked-to-reduction-in-cancer-mortality/
*  Why Isn't the Teen Mortality Rate Dropping?
Why Isn't the Teen Mortality Rate Dropping.
http://jezebel.com/5904955/why-isnt-the-teen-mortality-rate-dropping?tag=Teenagers
*  1860 Robertson County, TN Mortality Schedule
robertson county tn mortality schedule
http://tngenweb.org/robertson/census/page482.htm
*  Old Mortality
...
http://archive.org/stream/oldmortality00scotuoft
*  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Weekly
| MMWR
http://cdc.gov/mmwr/author_guide.html
*  Comments on Conversations With My Ancestors: Tombstone Tuesday - Facing Mortality
Mavishttp://www.blogger.com/profile/10241988882011440597noreply@blogger.com 2015-09-22T00:29:05.369-07:00 Blogger
http://conversationswithmyancestors.blogspot.com/feeds/7117368249608797462/comments/default
*  Comments on: #653; In which Mortality looms
An Illustrated Jocularity. Mon, 09 Mar 2015 10:57:44 +0000
http://wondermark.com/653/feed/
*  Balfour of Burley
... redirect old mortality
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balfour_of_Burley
*  Comments on:
DISRUPTING MORTALITY
http://brianshall.com/taxonomy/term/43/feed/
*  Risk factors affecting inhospital mortality after hip fracture: retrospective analysis using the Jap
Conclusions In patients with hip fractures, male gender, advancing age, high number of comorbidities, conservative treatment and the surgical delay of 5 days or more were associated with higher rates of inhospital mortality. The overall inhospital mortality rate was 3.3%, and the inhospital mortality was significantly associated with male gender OR 2.12 compared with female gender; p 0.001, advancing age OR 1.57 in the 70–79 years age group, 2.28 in the 80–89 years age group and 3.51 in the ≥90 years age group compared with the 60–69 years age group; p 0.001, conservative treatment OR 4.25 compared with the surgical treatment group; p 0.001 and number of comorbidities OR 2.50 in patients with one comorbidity and 3.79 in those with two or more comorbidities compared with no comorbidity; p 0.001. In this study, we investigated the inhospital mortality rate of patients with hip fracture using data from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination DPC nationwide administrative claims ...
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/3/e000416.full?ga=w_bmjj_bmj-com
*  Howell M, Donnino M, Clardy P, et al. Occult hypoperfusion and mortality in patients with suspected
... infection PDF Download Available. For full functionality of ResearchGate it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser. Article Howell M, Donnino M, Clardy P, et al. Occult hypoperfusion and mortality in patients with suspected infection. Michael D Howell. Michael D Howell. Remove suggestion. Michael Donnino. Michael Donnino. Remove suggestion. Peter F Clardy. Peter F Clardy Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Message author. Remove suggestion. Daniel Talmor. Daniel Talmor. Remove suggestion. Nathan I Shapiro. Nathan I Shapiro Harvard Medical School Message author. Remove suggestion. Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States Intensive Care Medicine. Impact Factor: 7.21. 12/2007; 33 11 :1892-9. DOI: 10.1007/s00134-007-0680-5 Source: PubMed. ABSTRACT To determine, in the early stages of suspected clinically significant infection, the independent relationship of the presenting venous lactate level to 28-day in-hospital ...
http://researchgate.net/publication/6220326_Howell_M_Donnino_M_Clardy_P_et_al._Occult_hypoperfusion_and_mortality_in_patients_with_suspected_infection
*  Risk-adjusting Hospital Mortality Using a Comprehensive Elec... : Medical Care
... Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. Medical Care Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Risk-adjusting Hospital Mortality Using a Comprehensive Elec... A A You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you... If you have access to this article through your institution, you can view this article in. Medical Care: May 2013 - Volume 51 - Issue 5 - p 446–453 doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3182881c8e Original Articles. Risk-adjusting Hospital Mortality Using a Comprehensive Electronic Record in an Integrated Health Care Delivery System Escobar, Gabriel J. In the validation dataset, the greatest improvement in discrimination increase in c statistic occurred with the introduction of laboratory data; however, subsequent addition of vital signs and end-of-life care directive data had significant effects on integrated ...
http://journals.lww.com/lww-medicalcare/Abstract/2013/05000/Risk_adjusting_Hospital_Mortality_Using_a.11.aspx
*  JAMA Network | JAMA | Risk Stratification for In-Hospital Mortality in Acutely Decompensated Hear
Risk Stratification for In-Hospital Mortality in Acutely Decompensated Heart Failure: Classification and Regression Tree Analysis. Risk Stratification for In-Hospital Mortality in Acutely Decompensated Heart Failure : Classification and Regression Tree Analysis FREE Gregg C. Data used to model risk were taken from the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry ADHERE. These data were subjected to classification and regression tree CART analysis to identify the best predictors of in-hospital mortality and develop the risk stratification model. + View Large | Save Table | Download Slide .ppt | View in Article Context. The patients from the validation cohort were classified into risk groups based on the CART tree. + View Large | Save Table | Download Slide .ppt | View in Article Context. + View Large | Save Table | Download Slide .ppt | View in Article Context. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality and Risk Stratification for the Derivation Cohort Graphic Jump Location. View ...
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=200287
*  Relationships between Volume, Efficiency, and Quality in Surgery A Delicate Balance from Manageria
... l Perspectives - ResearchGate. Impact Factor: 2.64. Outcome data theoretically are optimal measures of quality, but surgical quality is multifactorially influenced by case mix, surgical technique, indication, process designs, organizational structures, and volume. Factors involve learning effects both on process efficiency and quality, increased standardization and task specialization, process flow homogeneity, and potential for process integration. In-hospital mortality after stomach cancer surgery in Spain and relationship with hospital volume of interventions. ABSTRACT: There is no consensus about the possible relation between in-hospital mortality in surgery for gastric cancer and the hospital annual volume of interventions. The objectives were to identify factors associated to greater in-hospital mortality for surgery in gastric cancer and to analyze the possible independent relation between hospital annual volume and in-hospital mortality. The overall and specific ...
http://researchgate.net/publication/7625454_Relationships_between_Volume_Efficiency_and_Quality_in_Surgery__A_Delicate_Balance_from_Managerial_Perspectives
*  Treatment With Neuromuscular Blocking Agents and the Risk of... : Critical Care Medicine
... Critical Care Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Treatment With Neuromuscular Blocking Agents and the Risk of... If you have access to this article through your institution, you can view this article in. Treatment With Neuromuscular Blocking Agents and the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality Among Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Severe Sepsis* Steingrub, Jay S. Objectives: Recent trials suggest that treatment with neuromuscular blocking agents may improve survival in patients requiring mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome. We examined the association between receipt of a neuromuscular blocking agent and in-hospital mortality among mechanically ventilated patients with severe sepsis. In 3,518 patients matched on the propensity for treatment, receipt of a neuromuscular blocking agent was associated with a reduced risk of in-hospital mortality risk ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.80, 0.96. An analysis using the hospital neuromuscular blocking agent-prescribing rate ...
http://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal/Abstract/2014/01000/Treatment_With_Neuromuscular_Blocking_Agents_and.12.aspx?WT.mc_id=HPxADx20100319xMP
*  .. Study Finds Critical Delay in Most MI Patients Transferred for Primary PCI .. Share this page: .
JAMA demonstrates that a DIDO time of 30 minutes or less is associated with shorter reperfusion delays and lower in-hospital mortality, but the study also showed that only a small proportion of patients are currently transferred this rapidly. Using registry data on 14,821 patients with STEMI who were transferred to 298Â hospitals for primary PCI, Tracy Wang and colleagues found that the median DIDO time was 68 minutes, and only 11% of patients had DIDO times within the recommended 30 minutes. The overall door-to-balloon time was 85 minutes in those with a DIDO time less than 30 minutes compared to 127 minutes in those with a DIDO time greater than 30 minutes p 0.001. Among the STEMI patients in the study transferred to a STEMI receiving hospital for primary PCI, the median midpoint DIDO time was 68 minutes. Only 1,627 patients 11 percent had a DIDO time of 30 minutes or less; 56 percent had a DIDO time of greater than 60 minutes and 35 percent had a DIDO time of greater than 90 minutes. The ...
http://cardiobrief.org/2011/06/21/study-finds-critical-delay-in-most-mi-patients-transferred-for-primary-pci/
*  High Infant Mortality Rates In Brooklyn Mystify Experts - NYTimes.com
... campaign: nyt2014 bar1 digihd regi BAU -- 268632, creative: nyt2015 bar1 digihd BAU 4JQ88 4JQ8F 4JQ8J 4JQ8L -- 399712, page: www.nytimes.com/archive/article/nyregion, targetedPage: www.nytimes.com/archive/article/nyregion, position: Bar1. High Infant Mortality Rates In Brooklyn Mystify Experts By JENNIFER STEINHAUER. While the infant mortality rate in New York City has fallen steadily in the last decade, it has fallen much more slowly in neighborhoods like Bedford-Stuyvesant and Brownsville, neighborhoods with considerable populations of new immigrants. Bedford-Stuyvesant, however, has one of the highest rates in the country, 14 per 1,000, a 20 percent increase over 1997. The last time the average rate of infant mortality was that high in New York City over all was 1983. Other mothers want prenatal care but cannot get it because they live too far from a health clinic or hospital, or have small children and no one at home to care for them while they make the trek to the doctor. For ...
http://nytimes.com/2000/02/29/nyregion/high-infant-mortality-rates-in-brooklyn-mystify-experts.html?src=pm
*  Learn more about infant mortality | (e) Science News
Learn more about infant mortality. e Science News. e Science News. Get science news via. Home > Learn more about infant mortality. Science news articles about 'infant mortality' U.S. for the complications of premature births as well as reducing infant mortality rates, particularly in black communities ... Drugs reduce infant mortality Iron-folic acid supplements, taken with anti-malarial drugs during pregnancy could reduce 25 per cent of early infant mortality. Study finds that electronic fetal heart rate monitoring greatly reduces infant mortality ... Electronic medical records lower infant mortality, study finds ... medical records would substantially reduce infant mortality in the U.S., according to a study forthcoming in the Journal ... Infant mortality linked to subsequent risk of stillbirth finds new US study ... Canada s rank on infant mortality index called unfair Canada would rank higher on international child health ...
http://esciencenews.com/dictionary/infant.mortality
*  Infant Mortality News - The New York Times
... Infant Mortality. Real Estate. Study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that India's high infant mortality rate can be blamed on relatively poor health of mothers; many young women are severely anemic due to poor sanitation and cultural bias that allows them less food than other family members. /svc/timestopic/v1/topic.json?limit=10&type=article%2Cblogpost&fq=%28subject%3A%22INFANT+MORTALITY%22%29+AND++-type of material%3A%22Caption%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Correction%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22List%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Paid+Death+Notice%22+AND++-news desk%3A%22Society%22&. {"type":"article","show header text":true,"header":"ARTICLES ABOUT INFANT MORTALITY","query":" des=\"INFANT MORTALITY\" and tom!=\"Caption\" and tom!=\"Correction\" and tom!=\"List\" and tom!=\"Paid Death Notice\" and dsk!=\"Society\"","search query":" subject:\"INFANT MORTALITY\" AND -type of material:\"Caption\" AND -type of ...
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/i/infant_mortality/index.html?query=Al Jazeera&field=org&match=exact
*  Infant Mortality News - The New York Times
... Infant Mortality. Real Estate. Study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that India's high infant mortality rate can be blamed on relatively poor health of mothers; many young women are severely anemic due to poor sanitation and cultural bias that allows them less food than other family members. /svc/timestopic/v1/topic.json?limit=10&type=article%2Cblogpost&fq=%28subject%3A%22INFANT+MORTALITY%22%29+AND++-type of material%3A%22Caption%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Correction%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22List%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Paid+Death+Notice%22+AND++-news desk%3A%22Society%22&. {"type":"article","show header text":true,"header":"ARTICLES ABOUT INFANT MORTALITY","query":" des=\"INFANT MORTALITY\" and tom!=\"Caption\" and tom!=\"Correction\" and tom!=\"List\" and tom!=\"Paid Death Notice\" and dsk!=\"Society\"","search query":" subject:\"INFANT MORTALITY\" AND -type of material:\"Caption\" AND -type of ...
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/i/infant_mortality/index.html?query=Embezzlement&field=des&match=exact
*  Infant Mortality News - The New York Times
... Infant Mortality. Real Estate. Study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that India's high infant mortality rate can be blamed on relatively poor health of mothers; many young women are severely anemic due to poor sanitation and cultural bias that allows them less food than other family members. /svc/timestopic/v1/topic.json?limit=10&type=article%2Cblogpost&fq=%28subject%3A%22INFANT+MORTALITY%22%29+AND++-type of material%3A%22Caption%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Correction%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22List%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Paid+Death+Notice%22+AND++-news desk%3A%22Society%22&. {"type":"article","show header text":true,"header":"ARTICLES ABOUT INFANT MORTALITY","query":" des=\"INFANT MORTALITY\" and tom!=\"Caption\" and tom!=\"Correction\" and tom!=\"List\" and tom!=\"Paid Death Notice\" and dsk!=\"Society\"","search query":" subject:\"INFANT MORTALITY\" AND -type of material:\"Caption\" AND -type of ...
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/i/infant_mortality/index.html?query=Hepatitis&field=des&match=exact
*  Infant Mortality News - The New York Times
... Infant Mortality. Real Estate. Study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that India's high infant mortality rate can be blamed on relatively poor health of mothers; many young women are severely anemic due to poor sanitation and cultural bias that allows them less food than other family members. /svc/timestopic/v1/topic.json?limit=10&type=article%2Cblogpost&fq=%28subject%3A%22INFANT+MORTALITY%22%29+AND++-type of material%3A%22Caption%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Correction%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22List%22+AND++-type of material%3A%22Paid+Death+Notice%22+AND++-news desk%3A%22Society%22&. {"type":"article","show header text":true,"header":"ARTICLES ABOUT INFANT MORTALITY","query":" des=\"INFANT MORTALITY\" and tom!=\"Caption\" and tom!=\"Correction\" and tom!=\"List\" and tom!=\"Paid Death Notice\" and dsk!=\"Society\"","search query":" subject:\"INFANT MORTALITY\" AND -type of material:\"Caption\" AND -type of ...
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/i/infant_mortality/index.html?query=Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010)&field=des&match=exact
*  Infant mortality | Tallahassee Democrat | tallahassee.com
Infant mortality. News. Infant mortality. NEWS /. Infant mortality. Infant-mortality rate in Leon rivals emerging nations The death rate for black infants in Leon County is higher than rates of some emerging nations, while the rate for white infants is lower than rates of some of the most advanced industrialized countries. NEWS /. Infant mortality. Death rate for black infants up Black babies in Leon County continue to die at a higher rate than white babies, according to recent statistics from the Florida Department of Health. The black infant-mortality rate in Leon County increased from 14.7 per 1,000 in 2005 to 15 per 1,000 last year. NEWS /. Infant mortality. Feb. NEWS /. Infant mortality. Feb. NEWS /. Infant mortality. Feb. NEWS /. Infant mortality. Experts to meet on infant mortality Area experts on infant mortality will meet today to discuss why black babies in some parts of the state die at higher rates than white ...
http://tallahassee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/section?Category=news0107
*  Report: US Infant Mortality Rate Twice That of Other Wealthy Nations | Parenting
Report: US Infant Mortality Rate Twice That of Other Wealthy Nations. Parenting. Planning for Pregnancy. Pregnancy Nutrition. Baby Names. Baby Health. Toddler Toddler Sleep. Toddler Health. Advice New Parents. Search Search form Search. You are here Home / Parenting Advice / Tips Tricks Report: US Infant Mortality Rate Twice That of Other Wealthy Nations. With 32.7 deaths for every 100,000 live births, the US infant mortality rate more than doubles that of Sweden and Japan. The United States has a higher infant mortality rate than other similarly wealthy countries, a report requested by the US government showed Wednesday. With 32.7 deaths for every 100,000 live births, the US infant mortality rate more than doubles that of Sweden and Japan, according to the report. Countries similar to the US have infant mortality rates between 15 and 25 deaths for every 100,000 births. The US also has a high death rate for children under 5 and a low birth rate compared to other ...
http://parenting.com/blogs/show-and-tell/brian-parentingcom/infant-mortality?con=blog&loc=bottomnext
*  Obese Moms Increase Infant Mortality Risk : Disease Proof
... Disease Proof : Disease Proof : Health & Nutrition News & Commentary : Dr. Joel Fuhrman The Official Blog of Joel Fuhrman, M.D. Subscribe Add this blog to your feeds or put your e-mail in the box below and hit GO to subscribe by e-mail. Success Stories DrFuhrman.com Archives. Home > Healthy Pregnancy > Obese Moms Increase Infant Mortality Risk Obese Moms Increase Infant Mortality Risk Posted on February 4, 2009 by Gerald Pugliese Print. New research Epidemiology claims babies born to obese moms are more likely to die in the first weeks of life than infants of normal-weight mothers. Scientists examined medical records of more than 4,000 babies who died in infancy and records of over 7,000 surviving babies and found among the babies who died, 8.8% had obese mothers, compared to 5.9% of surviving infants. And women who gained the most weight during pregnancy had the highest rate of infant mortality; Reuters reports. A previous study determined a mother s diet can actually influence the ...
http://diseaseproof.com/archives/healthy-pregnancy-obese-moms-increase-infant-mortality-risk.html
*  State records drop in infant mortality rate | The Indian Express
State records drop in infant mortality rate. The Indian Express. Latest News. Good News. Good News. State records drop in infant mortality rate. State records drop in infant mortality rate The latest health statistics have brought good news for Uttar Pradesh which is otherwise known for its abysmally high infant mortality rates IMR – the number of deaths of children less than one year of age per 1,000 live births. Written by SURBHI KHYATI. Published:September 24, 2013 3:58 am The latest health statistics have brought good news for Uttar Pradesh which is otherwise known for its abysmally high infant mortality rates IMR – the number of deaths of children less than one year of age per 1,000 live births. As per the Sample Registration Survey SRS bulletin of 2013,released earlier this month,the IMR of Uttar Pradesh has fallen by four points,from 57 per 1,000 live births in 2011 to 53 per 1,000 live births in 2012. However,UP and Orissa are the only two states in the country to ...
http://indianexpress.com/article/cities/lucknow/state-records-drop-in-infant-mortality-rate/
*  News & Events: SOURCES: What causes the gap in the infant mortality rate? Professor explains
News Events: SOURCES: What causes the gap in the infant mortality rate. Beloit College Magazine Alumni Newsletter Alumni Association Giving. What causes the gap in the infant mortality rate. The large and persistent gap in the infant mortality rate between blacks and whites was the topic of a speech Assistant Professor of Health and Society Rongal Nikora gave last week at his alma mater, the University of New Mexico. In "Let's Talk About Embodiment: Considering Internalized Trauma in US Health Disparities," Nikora discussed how the gap in the infant mortality rate between the two racial groups has worsened even though the rates have lowered. Factors including the education, income, marital status and age of a mother can affect the infant mortality rate for white women much more than black women, and one of the most striking facts to Nikora is that the infant mortality rates for the most educated black woman are never lower than for the least educated white woman. He ...
http://beloit.edu/news/sources/?story_id=395721
*  The effects of labor on infant mortality among small-for-gestational-age infants in the USA.
... Document Detail. The effects of labor on infant mortality among small-for-gestational-age infants in the USA. MedLine Citation:. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the presence of labor affects infant mortality among small-for-gestational-age SGA infants. METHODS: Data were derived from the United States national linked birth/infant death data sets for 1995-97. Mortality rates for SGA infants exposed and unexposed to labor were compared, and relative risks RR were derived using multivariable logistic regression models, after adjusting for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Of 986 405 SGA infants, 87.4% were exposed to labor. Infants exposed to labor at 24-31 weeks had greater risks of dying during the early neonatal period RR 1.79-1.86. Decreased risks of late and postneonatal death were observed at all gestational ages in the presence of labor. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to labor is associated with an increased risk of early neonatal death among SGA infants, especially at gestational ...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/effects-labor-infant-mortality-among/12530619.html
*  Infant Mortality Child Health USA 2012
... Rural and Urban Data. Rural and Urban Data. Infant Mortality. Infant Mortality Narrative In 2008, 4,662 infants born to residents of rural or non-metropolitan counties died in the first year of life. The infant mortality rate was higher in small and large rural counties 7.31 and 7.10 deaths per 1,000 live births, respectively than in urban counties 6.51 per 1,000. Although the infant mortality rate in rural counties was higher than urban counties in both the neonatal 28 days and postneonatal periods 28 to 364 days, disparities were only significant in the postneonatal period. For example, postneonatal mortality was 27 percent higher in small rural counties than urban counties, while neonatal mortality was only 5 percent higher. 3 1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Quick Stats: Leading Causes of Neonatal and Postneonatal Deaths — United States, 2002. 3 National Center for Health Statistics. Data Infant, Neonatal, and Postneonatal Mortality ...
http://mchb.hrsa.gov/chusa12/rud/pages/im.html
*  infant mortality rate | Britannica.com
infant mortality rate. Consequently, mortality rates tend to be lower in developed countries and higher in less-developed countries. Angola’s birth rate is among the highest in the world; however, so too is the country’s infant mortality rate. birth control birth control : Birth control and health ...to 60 percent higher among girls under 15 than among women who have a child in their early 20s. population biology and anthropology : Infant mortality Infant mortality is conventionally measured as the number of deaths in the first year of life per 1,000 live births during the same year. collective poverty poverty : Collective poverty ...in many developing countries, the population grows even faster than the economy does, with no net reduction in poverty as a result. About 30 percent of all postnatal infant mortality in developed countries is due to genetic disease; 30 percent of pediatric and 10 percent of adult hospital admissions can be traced to a predominantly ...
http://britannica.com/science/infant-mortality-rate
*  U.S. infant mortality down 12 percent since 2005 - UPI.com
infant mortality down 12 percent since 2005 - UPI.com. Top News. News. World News. Security Industry. Energy Industry. News. Home / Health News U.S. infant mortality down 12 percent since 2005. infant mortality rate plateaued from 2000-05 but declined again from 2005-11, officials say. Mathews of the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found in 2005 the infant mortality rate was 6.87 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, not significantly different from the rate of 6.91 in 2000. infant mortality rate declined significantly from 2005-06, but did not change significantly from 2006-07, and then declined significantly each year from 2007 through 2010, the report said. infant mortality rate was 6.05 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, 12 percent lower than the rate of 6.87 in 2005. From 2005 through 2011, the neonatal mortality rate -- deaths under age 28 days per 1,000 live births -- declined 11 percent ...
http://upi.com/Health_News/2013/04/18/US-infant-mortality-down-12-percent-since-2005/UPI-75371366327300/?rel=93361366390342
*  Infant Mortality
... Skip to content. Agencies. Governor Search Virginia.Gov. Home. VDH Programs. Find It. A-Z Index. Newsroom. Administration. Jobs. disclaimer. Home > Infant Mortality Infant Mortality. Infant Mortality Strategic Plan for Virginia Resources for Parents and Consumers Health Commissioner Infant Mortality Workgroup Implementation Teams Contact Us. Infant Mortality Definition: Infant mortality is one of the most important indicators of the health of a state, as it is associated with a variety of factors such as maternal health, quality and access to medical care, socioeconomic conditions, and public health practices. Goal: Decreasing the infant mortality rate from 6.7 to 5.7 deaths per 1000 live births by 2018 in Virginia. To get involved in the state's reduction efforts, click here. Infant Mortality Strategic Plan for Virginia Partners Health Commissioner Infant Mortality Workgroup. Resource for Parents and Consumers Implementation Teams Calendar ...
https://vdh.virginia.gov/infantmortality/index.htm
*  Infant mortality
It is measured as infant mortality rate IMR, which is the number of deaths of children under one year of age per 1000 live births. Infant mortality rate IMR is the number of deaths of children less than one year of age per 1000 live births. In the United States, a primary determinant of infant mortality risk is infant birth weight with lower birth weights increasing the risk of infant mortality. Low birth weight makes up 60–80% of the infant mortality rate in developing countries. As compared with normal-birth-weight infants, those with low weight at birth are almost 40 times more likely to die in the neonatal period; for infants with very low weight at birth the relative risk of neonatal death is almost 200 times greater." Infant mortality due to low birth weight is usually a direct cause stemming from other medical complications such as preterm birth, poor maternal nutritional status, lack of prenatal care, maternal sickness during pregnancy, and an unhygienic home ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infant_mortality
*  NICHQ.Org | Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network to Reduce Infant Mortality (IM CoIIN
Managing Life Stressors Helps to Reduce Infant Mortality Read Diaper Vouchers Add Extra Incentive for Pregnant Women to Quit Smoking Read A Practical Approach to Keep Stakeholders Engaged: Factsheets Are Helping Wisconsin Build and Maintain Support for their Infant Health Work Read Inspiring Change through Motivational Interviewing Read Addressing Infant Health Disparities in the American Indian Population Starts by Building Trust with Tribes Read Resources and Must Reads for Infant Mortality Awareness Month Read Video: Lauren Smith speaks at African American Infant Mortality in Colorado Summit View States Put the Squash on Smoking During Pregnancy Read Alaska Shows Perinatal Regionalization Works to Reduce Infant Deaths Read Viewpoint: A Novel Method for Tackling Complex Population Health Problems Read Strengthening and Leveraging Preconception and Interconception Health Read Investigating a Possible Link Between Substance Abuse and Infant Mortality Read High-Profile Coverage for ...
http://nichq.org/childrens health/infant health/coiin to reduce infant mortality
*  Infant mortality, part 3: A public health crisis needs solutions | state of opportunity
Infant mortality, part 3: A public health crisis needs solutions. state of opportunity. STATE OF OPPORTUNITY. Infant mortality, part 3: A public health crisis needs solutions. Social worker Jenny Hall visits a client and her children at their apartment as part of the Healthy Start program in Genesee County. A Healthy Start approach, or how to get the black infant mortality rate down to zero. Hall is a social worker in Genesee County and she visits her client, Melissa, three or four times a month. These home visits are part of Healthy Start, a program designed to reduce infant mortality disparities in places with some of the worst birth outcomes. There are six Healthy Start programs in Michigan with more on the way. Well, when the Genesee County program began over ten years ago, the African American infant mortality rate there was nearly four times higher than the rate for white babies. Today, the black infant mortality rate for Healthy Start babies in Genesee County ...
http://stateofopportunity.michiganradio.org/post/infant-mortality-part-3-public-health-crisis-needs-solutions
*  Infant mortality - Psychology Wiki
... Infant mortality is defined as the number of infant deaths one year of age or younger per 1000 live births. Infant mortality rate IMR is the number of newborns dying under a year of age divided by the number of live births during the year times 1000. It is the number of deaths that occur in the first year of life for 1000 live births. The infant mortality rate is reported as number of live newborns dying under a year of age per 1,000 live births, so that IMRs from different countries can be compared. Many countries, however, including certain European states and Japan, only count as live births cases where an infant breathes at birth, which makes their reported IMR numbers somewhat lower and raises their rates of perinatal mortality. In 2001, the Infant Mortality Rate for Less Developed Countries 91 was about 10 times as large as it was for More Developed Countries 8. For Least Developed Countries, the Infant Mortality Rate is 17 times as high as it is for More ...
http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/Infant_mortality?oldid=120039
*  EDITORIAL: Black infant mortality rates have returned as Fresno crisis | Fresno Bee
EDITORIAL: Black infant mortality rates have returned as Fresno crisis. Fresno Bee. Customer Service. Customer Service About Us Contact Us FAQ Advertise Place Classified Ad Display Advertising Stay Connected Mobile Facebook Twitter E-mail RSS Feeds. Activate Digital Subscription Manage Account E-Edition Newsletters. Sports High Schools Outdoors Grizzlies MLB MLB Scores Stats NBA NBA Scores Stats NFL NFL Scores Stats College Columnists Andy Boogaard Marek Warszawski David White. Local Deals Today s Hot Deal Grocery Coupons Today s Circulars Local Ads Special Sections. Classifieds. Classifieds Auctions/Estate Sales Garage Sales Real Estate New Homes Map Apartments and Rentals Jobs Automotive Merchandise Pets Legal Notices Service Directory. Place An Ad. Search Real Estate New Homes Map. Editorials. EDITORIAL: Black infant mortality rates have returned as Fresno crisis. Motivated by the fact that Fresno County has one of the highest mortality rates in the nation for black infants, community ...
http://fresnobee.com/opinion/editorials/article19517526.html

Mortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Muskoka Initiative: The Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health is a funding initiative announced at the 36th G8 summit which commits member nations to collectively spend an additional $5 billion between 2010 and 2015 to accelerate progress toward the achievement of Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, the reduction of maternal, infant and child mortality in developing countries. A second summit on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health was held in Toronto from May 28-30, 2014 in follow-up to the original 36th G8 summit.Sisterhood method: The Sisterhood Method is a household survey to estimate maternal deaths, which includes a series of four questions. The Sisterhood Method is one method recommended by the WHO.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingCancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,HeartScore: HeartScore is a cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management tool developed by the European Society of Cardiology, aimed at supporting clinicians in optimising individual cardiovascular risk reduction.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Certificate of relief from disabilities: A Certificate of relief from disabilities is issued by a state of the United States of America to a person who has committed a felony or misdemeanor but has subsequently shown that he or she has been rehabilitated. The closely related "Certificate of good conduct" is given to a person who has committed two or more felonies and has demonstrated rehabilitation.Disease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.Morbidity and mortality conference: Morbidity and mortality}}QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.List of U.S. states by life expectancy: This article presents a list of United States states sorted by their life expectancy at birth and by race/ethnicity in every state where the population of that racial or ethnic group is sufficiently large for robust estimates. The data is taken from the Measure of America's third national human development report, The Measure of America 2013–2014 width="25%" align="center" |Electrocardiography in myocardial infarctionRegression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Epidemiological method: The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates and John Snow. The techniques for gathering and analyzing epidemiological data vary depending on the type of disease being monitored but each study will have overarching similarities.Dialysis adequacy: In nephrology, dialysis adequacy is the measurement of renal dialysis for the purpose of determining dialysis treatment regime and to better understand the pathophysiology of renal dialysis. It is an area of considerable controversy in nephrology.Sepsis Alliance: Sepsis Alliance is a voluntary health organization dedicated to raising awareness of sepsis by educating patients, families, and healthcare professionals to treat sepsis as a medical emergency.http://www.North Wales Narrow Gauge RailwaysNathan W. LevinRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Management of heart failure: Management of heart failure requires a multimodal approach. It involves a combination of lifestyle modifications, medications, and possibly the use of devices or surgery.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Niigata UniversityClimate change in Sweden: The issue of climate change has received significant public and political attention in Sweden and the mitigation of its effects has been high on the agenda of the two latest Governments of Sweden, the previous Cabinet of Göran Persson (-2006) and the current Cabinet of Fredrik Reinfeldt (2006-). Sweden aims for an energy supply system with zero net atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.List of kanji by stroke count: This Kanji index method groups together the kanji that are written with the same number of strokes. Currently, there are 2,186 individual kanji listed.GA²LENLucas paradox: In economics, the Lucas paradox or the Lucas puzzle is the observation that capital does not flow from developed countries to developing countries despite the fact that developing countries have lower levels of capital per worker.}}List of lighthouses in Spain: This is a list of lighthouses in Spain.Four Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.AIP Conference Proceedings: AIP Conference Proceedings is a serial published by the American Institute of Physics since 1970. It publishes the proceedings from various conferences of physics societies.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Hospital-acquired pneumonia: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or nosocomial pneumonia refers to any pneumonia contracted by a patient in a hospital at least 48–72 hours after being admitted. It is thus distinguished from community-acquired pneumonia.Apache AvroAarhus Faculty of Health Sciences (Aarhus University): The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences is a faculty of Aarhus University. The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences became a reality after Aarhus University was divided into four new main academic areas which came into effect on 1 January 2011.National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The U.S.Australia–Finland relations: Australia–Finland relations are foreign relations between the Australia and Finland. Diplomatic relations were established on 31 May 1949.Silent strokeTriangle of death (Italy): The triangle of death (Italian: Triangolo della morte) is an area in the Italian province of Campania comprising the municipalities of Acerra, Nola and Marigliano. The region has recently experienced increasing deaths caused by cancer and other diseases that exceeds the Italian national average.Inverse probability weighting: Inverse probability weighting is a statistical technique for calculating statistics standardized to a population different from that in which the data was collected. Study designs with a disparate sampling population and population of target inference (target population) are common in application.University of CampinasList of film accidents: This is intended to be a list of notable accidents which occurred during the shooting of films and television, such as cast or crew fatalities or serious accidents which plagued production. It is not intended to be a list of every minor injury an actor or stuntman suffered during filming.Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Advanced Chemical Industries (ACI): ৳ 238 Million http://www.aci-bd.Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Air pollution: Air pollution is the introduction of particulates, biological molecules, or other harmful materials into Earth's atmosphere, causing diseases, death to humans, damage to other living organisms such as animals and food crops, or the natural or built environment. Air pollution may come from anthropogenic or natural sources.

(1/4576) The expiry date of man: a synthesis of evolutionary biology and public health.

In industrialised countries, mortality and morbidity are dominated by age related chronic degenerative diseases. The health and health care needs of future populations will be heavily determined by these conditions of old age. Two opposite scenarios of future morbidity exist: morbidity might decrease ("compress"), because life span is limited, and the incidence of disease is postponed. Or morbidity might increase ("expand"), because death is delayed more than disease incidence. Optimality theory in evolutionary biology explains senescence as a by product of an optimised life history. The theory clarifies how senescence is timed by the competing needs for reproduction and survival, and why this leads to a generalised deterioration of many functions at many levels. As death and disease are not independent, future morbidity will depend on duration and severity of the process of senescence, partly determined by health care, palliating the disease severity but increasing the disease duration by postponing death. Even if morbidity might be compressed, health care needs will surely expand.  (+info)

(2/4576) Avoidable mortality in Europe 1955-1994: a plea for prevention.

OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends of avoidable mortality in Europe, emphasising causes of death amenable to primary prevention through reduction of exposures, secondary prevention through early detection and treatment, and tertiary prevention through improved treatment and medical care. DESIGN: Descriptive study of mortality from avoidable causes for the years 1955 through 1994, for ages 5-64 at time of death. Using the World Health Organisation Mortality Database, five year death rates were standardised to the world population. SETTING: 21 countries of Europe in four regions (northern, central, and southern Europe, Nordic countries). PARTICIPANTS: All causes of deaths for men and women, aged 5-64, at time of death. MAIN RESULTS: Between 1955-59 and 1990-94, the reduction in mortality was somewhat greater for avoidable causes than for all causes: 45.8% v 45.1% (women) and 39.3% v 32.6% among men. Reductions in mortality were greater for causes amenable to improved medical care: 77.9% among women and 76.3% among men. The smallest reduction in mortality was seen in women for causes amenable to secondary prevention (11.0%), and in men for causes amendable to primary prevention including tobacco related conditions (16.6%). From a geographical point of view, there were slight differences in trends between European regions, but overall the patterns were similar. CONCLUSIONS: The greatest reduction of avoidable mortality in Europe from 1955-94 came from causes amenable to improved treatment and medical care for both sexes. Further reductions of avoidable mortality can be achieved through implementation of primary and secondary prevention activities, such as tobacco control, reduction of occupational exposures, and universal access to breast and cervical cancer screening programmes.  (+info)

(3/4576) The meaning and use of the cumulative rate of potential life lost.

BACKGROUND: The 'years of potential life lost' (YPLL) is a public health measure in widespread use. However, the index does not apply to the comparisons between different populations or across different time periods. It also has the limit of being cross-sectional in nature, quantifying current burden but not future impact on society. METHODS: A new years-lost index is proposed-the 'cumulative rate of potential life lost' (CRPLL). It is a simple combination of the 'cumulative rate' (CR) and the YPLL. Vital statistics in Taiwan are used for demonstration and comparison of the new index with existing health-status measures. RESULTS: The CRPLL serves the purpose of between-group comparison. It can also be considered a projection of future impact, under the assumption that the age-specific mortality rates in the current year prevail. For a rare cause of death, it can be interpreted as the expected years (days) of potential life lost during a subject's lifetime. CONCLUSIONS: The CRPLL has several desirable properties, rendering it a promising alternative for quantifying health status.  (+info)

(4/4576) The European mesothelioma epidemic.

Projections for the period 1995-2029 suggest that the number of men dying from mesothelioma in Western Europe each year will almost double over the next 20 years, from 5000 in 1998 to about 9000 around 2018, and then decline, with a total of about a quarter of a million deaths over the next 35 years. The highest risk will be suffered by men born around 1945-50, of whom about 1 in 150 will die of mesothelioma. Asbestos use in Western Europe remained high until 1980, and substantial quantities are still used in several European countries. These projections are based on the fit of a simple age and birth cohort model to male pleural cancer mortality from 1970 to 1989 for six countries (Britain, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and Switzerland) which together account for three-quarters of the population of Western Europe. The model was tested by comparing observed and predicted numbers of deaths for the period 1990-94. The ratio of mesothelioma to recorded pleural cancer mortality has been 1.6:1 in Britain but was assumed to be 1:1 in other countries.  (+info)

(5/4576) A historical cohort mortality study of workers exposed to asbestos in a refitting shipyard.

To investigate the risks of developing asbestos-related diseases we conducted a historical cohort mortality study on 249 ship repair workers (90 laggers and 159 boiler repairers) in a single U.S. Navy shipyard in Japan. We successfully identified the vital status of 87 (96.7%) laggers and 150 (94.3%) boiler repairers, and, of these, 49 (56.3%) and 65 (43.3%) died, respectively, during the follow-up period from 1947 till the end of 1996. Our in-person interviews with some of the subjects clarified that asbestos exposure was considered to be substantially high in the 1950-60s, decreased thereafter gradually but remained till 1979 in the shipyard. The laggers, who had handled asbestos materials directly, showed a significantly elevated SMR of 2.75 (95% C.I.: 1.08-6.48) for lung cancer. The risk developing the disease was greater in the laggers after a 20-year latency (SMR = 3.42). Pancreatic cancer yielded a greater SMR than unity (7.78, 90% C.I.: 2.07-25.19) in a longer working years group. Four laggers died from asbestosis. The boiler repairers, who had many chances for secondary exposure to asbestos and a few for direct exposure, showed no elevation of the SMR of lung cancer overall, but there was a borderline statistically significant SMR of 2.41 (90% C.I.: 1.05-5.45) in a longer working years group. One boiler repairer died from mesothelioma and four from asbestosis.  (+info)

(6/4576) Effects of calcium-channel blockade in older patients with diabetes and systolic hypertension. Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial Investigators.

BACKGROUND: Recent reports suggest that calcium-channel blockers may be harmful in patients with diabetes and hypertension. We previously reported that antihypertensive treatment with the calcium-channel blocker nitrendipine reduced the risk of cardiovascular events. In this post hoc analysis, we compared the outcome of treatment with nitrendipine in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. METHODS: After stratification according to center, sex, and presence or absence of previous cardiovascular complications, 4695 patients (age, > or =60 years) with systolic blood pressure of 160 to 219 mm Hg and diastolic pressure below 95 mm Hg were randomly assigned to receive active treatment or placebo. Active treatment consisted of nitrendipine (10 to 40 mg per day) with the possible addition or substitution of enalapril (5 to 20 mg per day) or hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 to 25 mg per day) or both, titrated to reduce the systolic blood pressure by at least 20 mm Hg and to less than 150 mm Hg. In the control group, matching placebo tablets were administered similarly. RESULTS: At randomization, 492 patients (10.5 percent) had diabetes. After a median follow-up of two years, the systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the placebo and active-treatment groups differed by 8.6 and 3.9 mm Hg, respectively, among the diabetic patients. Among the 4203 patients without diabetes, systolic and diastolic pressures differed by 10.3 and 4.5 mm Hg, respectively, in the two groups. After adjustment for possible confounders, active treatment was found to have reduced overall mortality by 55 percent (from 45.1 deaths per 1000 patients to 26.4 deaths per 1000 patients), mortality from cardiovascular disease by 76 percent, all cardiovascular events combined by 69 percent, fatal and nonfatal strokes by 73 percent, and all cardiac events combined by 63 percent in the group of patients with diabetes. Among the nondiabetic patients, active treatment decreased all cardiovascular events combined by 26 percent and fatal and nonfatal strokes by 38 percent. In the group of patients receiving active treatment, reductions in overall mortality, mortality from cardiovascular disease, and all cardiovascular events were significantly larger among the diabetic patients than among the nondiabetic patients (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.01, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Nitrendipine-based antihypertensive therapy is particularly beneficial in older patients with diabetes and isolated systolic hypertension. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis that the use of long-acting calcium-channel blockers may be harmful in diabetic patients.  (+info)

(7/4576) Association between serum fructosamine and mortality in elderly women: the study of osteoporotic fractures.

Serum fructosamine levels can be used to estimate long-term serum glucose values and can be measured in frozen serum. The authors examined whether fructosamine levels were associated with mortality in a cohort of 9,704 white women (> or = 65 years of age) recruited from September 1986 to October 1988 at four clinical centers in the United States. A random sample of women who had died during a mean of 6 years of follow-up (n = 55) was compared with randomly selected controls (n = 276, 54 of whom had died). Fructosamine assays were performed blinded to vital status. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for age, clinical center, smoking, hypertension, and serum albumin and cholesterol levels. Each standard deviation (46 micromol) increase in fructosamine level was associated with a 1.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.6, p = 0.04) increased rate of all-cause mortality, including a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.0-2.1, p = 0.03) increase in cardiovascular disease mortality. Elevated fructosamine levels (>285 micromol/liter) were associated with a 4.3-fold (95% CI 1.6-12, p = 0.004) increased rate of cardiovascular mortality; in women without a history of diabetes, the hazard ratio was 4.6 (95% CI 1.3-16, p = 0.02). Fructosamine level, or another indicator of glycemia, should be included when the risk of cardiovascular disease among older patients is evaluated.  (+info)

(8/4576) Cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in men.

BACKGROUND: Cardiorespiratory fitness and body fatness are both related to health, but their interrelation to all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We examined the health benefits of leanness and the hazards of obesity while simultaneously considering cardiorespiratory fitness. DESIGN: This was an observational cohort study. We followed 21925 men, aged 30-83 y, who had a body-composition assessment and a maximal treadmill exercise test. There were 428 deaths (144 from CVD, 143 from cancer, and 141 from other causes) in an average of 8 y of follow-up (176742 man-years). RESULTS: After adjustment for age, examination year, cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, and parental history of ischemic heart disease, unfit (low cardiorespiratory fitness as determined by maximal exercise testing), lean men had double the risk of all-cause mortality of fit, lean men (relative risk: 2.07; 95% CI: 1.16, 3.69; P = 0.01). Unfit, lean men also had a higher risk of all-cause and CVD mortality than did men who were fit and obese. We observed similar results for fat and fat-free mass in relation to mortality. Unfit men had a higher risk of all-cause and CVD mortality than did fit men in all fat and fat-free mass categories. Similarly, unfit men with low waist girths (<87 cm) had greater risk of all-cause mortality than did fit men with high waist girths (> or =99 cm). CONCLUSIONS: The health benefits of leanness are limited to fit men, and being fit may reduce the hazards of obesity.  (+info)


infant


  • India's capital, N ew Delhi, has a disturbingly high infant - mortality rate, according to a new report released by the NGO Save the Children. (time.com)
  • Infant mortality rates in the U.S. remai nhigher than in most other developed countries, according to the center, and racial disparities exist. (davisclipper.com)
  • Study on Infant and Maternal Mortality in Odisha by Sahu Meenakhsi (Paperback. (ebay.com.au)
  • The book highlights the research study performed under the dissertation assignment through XISS at Odisha in the domain areas of the Essel Mining Limited in two panchayats Jalhari and Jajang Panchayat of Joda Block in Odisha .The study highlights some of the crucial facts, analysis etc, in the mentioned areas which were one of the major cause for the infant and maternal mortality in the area. (ebay.com.au)


Morbidity


  • Read 'Children at Risk from Ozone Air Pollution,' a pdf file that can be downloaded from a 1995 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on the CDC Web page. (edweek.org)
  • Liver and renal dysfunction are reported in these patients and have a direct effect on morbidity and mortality. (bmj.com)


reduce mortality


  • Since excessive sleep suggests that night time sleep is disrupted, interventions to treat sleep disorders and improve sleep quality in older women may reduce mortality risk," says Katie L. Stone, co-author of the study. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Cheng AC, West TE, Limmathurotsakul D, Peacock SJ (2008) Strategies to Reduce Mortality from Bacterial Sepsis in Adults in Developing Countries. (plos.org)


predicts


  • This study aims to investigate whether the Model for End-stage Liver Disease eXcluding INR score (function of creatinine and total bilirubin, MELD-XI) predicts risk for cardiac mortality or transplantation in patients with Fontan circulation. (bmj.com)
  • Objective To investigate whether attendance at cardiac rehabilitation (CR) independently predicts all-cause mortality over 14 years and whether there is a dose-response relationship between the proportion of CR sessions attended and long-term mortality. (bmj.com)


cardiac


  • Moreover, its presence was independently associated with an increased risk of severe COPD exacerbations [ 17 ] and an increased risk of cardiac injury and in-hospital mortality in individuals hospitalised with COPD exacerbations [ 18 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Cardiac rehabilitation mortality trends: how far from a true picture are we? (bmj.com)


maternal mortality


  • The World Health Organization's (WHO) report "Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2008" estimates that the annual maternal mortality rate is about 350,000 deaths and falling. (catholicnewsagency.com)


preventable


  • Because deaths of younger people are often preventable, the premature mortality rate is a measure that gives more weight to the death of younger people than to older people. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • To estimate up-to-date preventable fractions of cardiovascular mortality associated with elimination and reduction of 5 leading risk factors nationally and by state in the United States. (annals.org)


deaths


  • The premature mortality rate is calculated by multiplying the number of deaths occurring at each age by the number of remaining years of life up to a selected age limit. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • One-third of the premature mortality rate in the U.S. can be attributed to deaths resulting from external causes, including accidents, suicides, and assaults. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • The mortality rate in the COPD subgroup was two-fold higher than that in the entire population, with cardiovascular events accounting for most of these deaths. (ersjournals.com)
  • fishing mortality - A mathematical expression of the rate of deaths of fish due to fishing. (academic.ru)
  • fishing mortality - deaths or removal of fish from a population due to fishing. (academic.ru)
  • instantaneous rate of fishing mortality - When fishing and natural mortality act concurrently, F is equal to the instantaneous total mortality rate, multiplied by the ratio of fishing deaths to all deaths. (academic.ru)
  • However, in areas with scanty resources little reliable information is available on mortality rates and causes of death since many deaths go unregistered. (who.int)
  • The objective of this paper was to determine mortality patterns by cause, age group and gender in an urban slum in Kolkata by conducting surveillance of all deaths over a period of 18 months in a well-defined population. (who.int)


exposures


  • Trends in crude mortality rates with the reproductive exposures were examined. (bl.uk)


Centers


  • See the '1995 Final Mortality Statistics,' from the Centers for Disease Control Web page, or the download it as a PDF file. (edweek.org)


adult


  • Recent studies have linked air pollution with increased adult-mortality rates, but this is believed to be the first major study that describes the impact of air pollution on any of the nation's children. (edweek.org)


cohort


  • If two prospective cohort studies the gold standard of observational studies following more than 100,000 people for two decades published by one of the most prestigious institutions in the world isn't good enough for the Meat Institute, how about the largest such study ever the NIH-AARP study, "Meat Intake and Mortality: A Prospective Study of Over Half a Million People. (care2.com)
  • The authors assessed the association between proximity of the home to major roads and BOS and mortality in a cohort of patients after lung transplantation. (bmj.com)


reduction


  • Impressive decreases in cardiovascular mortality have been achieved through risk factor reduction and clinical intervention, yet cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death nationally. (annals.org)
  • These conclusions are strengthened by the fact that the reduction in mortality with the number of surviving children persisted after adjusting for potential confounders and by the remarkable consistency in the associations in the females and their husbands. (bl.uk)
  • A certain proportion of the sharp reduction in mortality associated with remarriage after divorce for men could be attributed to differences in disability between the remarried group and those who remained divorced. (ehesp.fr)


rates


  • I think the most interesting finding in the new Harvard studies is that even after factoring out known contributors of disease, such as saturated fat and cholesterol, they still found increased mortality risk, raising the question: what exactly is in the meat that is so significantly increasing cancer death rates, heart disease, and shortening people's lives? (care2.com)
  • Canada and its peer countries have all reduced their premature mortality rates over the past five decades. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • During the 1918 pandemic, illness rates were highest among children, but mortality was highest in young adults, a highly unusual pattern for influenza. (umn.edu)
  • A review of 1918 pandemic flu mortality rates in different populations suggests that exposure to bacterial pathogens played an important role, they wrote. (umn.edu)
  • Mortality rates were lower in people who had previous exposure in their occupational settings, such as military clinics, the article says. (umn.edu)
  • Poisson regression was then used to examine the association between reproductive history and all-cause mortality, adjustingf or potential confounders Crude mortality rates for the reproductive variables, stratified by age, education, religion and marital status, were also examined for effect modification and likelihood ratio tests for interaction performed. (bl.uk)
  • According to the CDC, the spike in death rates and the decline in mortality is due mostly to obesity (35% of us are obese) and its aftermaths - diabetes. (blogspot.com)
  • Part of the Body Shape Index's greater predictive powers with respects to obesity-related mortality rates is due to how it factors in the important variable of abdominal fat. (guardianlv.com)
  • The Body Shape Index is still in the process of being promoted as a new assessment tool that can easily be used to more accurately identify patients at a high risk for obesity-related diseases and increased mortality rates. (guardianlv.com)
  • Verbal autopsy is used by the Registrar General of India's Sample Registration System, the country's primary system for collecting demographic data, to estimate cause-specific mortality rates at the national and state levels. (who.int)


transplantation


  • 1 was significantly associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients with very severe COPD who were undergoing evaluation for lung transplantation [ 15 ]. (ersjournals.com)
  • Methods The authors calculated hazard ratios for BOS and mortality in relation to proximity of the home to major roads, adjusting for relevant covariables, in 288 patients after lung transplantation at the Leuven University Hospital between 1997 and 2009 and with follow-up until August 2009. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion Traffic-related air pollution appears to constitute a serious risk of BOS and mortality after lung transplantation. (bmj.com)


rate


  • The premature mortality rate is then determined by adding up the potential lost years of individuals in each country. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • In 2004-the most recent year of published data on the number of potential years of life lost in Canada-there was a premature mortality rate of 3,365 years of life lost per 100,000 population in Canada. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • In 2009, Canada's estimated premature mortality rate dropped to 2,999 years of life lost per 100,000 population. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Has Canada reduced its premature mortality rate? (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Canada's premature mortality rate has shown progressive improvement over the past four decades-the rate in 1960 was over three times the 2009 estimated rate. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Annually, Canada's premature mortality rate has decreased by an average of 127 years. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Japan recorded the most improvement, however, reducing its premature mortality rate by an average of 193 years annually since 1960. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Use the pull-down menu to compare the change in Canada's premature mortality rate with that of its peers. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Although Canada has reduced its premature mortality rate consistently over time, most of its peer countries have also seen steady improvement. (conferenceboard.ca)
  • Jan 13, 2012 (CIDRAP News) - Experts who have studied the 1918 pandemic have long puzzled over why the mortality rate in young adults was so high, a feature that might be explained by pathologic immune responses related to previous flu exposure, according to a new theory from a research team. (umn.edu)
  • Factors that led to high mortality during the 1918 pandemic, such as commercial and social isolation, no longer exist on a global scale, and most young adults are likely to be exposed to numerous viral and bacterial pathogens, according to Shanks and Brundage, who said their hypothesis may explain why the mortality rate for the 2009 H1N1 pandemic was relatively low. (umn.edu)
  • Usually expressed as the annual mortality, the percentage of fish dying in one year, or the instantaneous rate F, the percentage of fish dying at one time. (academic.ru)
  • fishing mortality rate - the fraction of an initial stock which would be caught during the year (or season) if no other causes of mortality operated. (academic.ru)
  • instantaneous rate of fishing mortality - used to describe the decrease in numbers of fish over time when fishing and natural mortality act concurrently (Nt = No * e^ Zt , where No is the initial number and Nt is the number of the remaining fish at the end of time t. (academic.ru)
  • Also called annual mortality rate. (academic.ru)
  • Scientists have recently confirmed the efficacy of a new tool-the Body Shape Index-which is reported to predict a person's obesity-related increase in mortality rate with greater accuracy than the time-old Body Mass Index (BMI). (guardianlv.com)


significantly


  • They found that red meat consumption was associated with living a significantly shorter life increased cancer mortality, increased heart disease mortality, and increased overall mortality. (care2.com)
  • Prospective data from the Matlab surveillance area in rural Bangladesh, 1974-1982, were used in this study to show that divorced and never-married adults (aged 15-44 years) had significantly higher mortality than their currently married peers with differences in disability status accounting for some of this excess risk. (ehesp.fr)


differences


  • There were no differences in the mortality of women with parity, either when comparing the parous with the nulliparous or when looking at trends with the number of children born. (bl.uk)
  • While a dose-response relationship may exist between the number of sessions attended and long-term mortality, this relationship does not occur independently of smoking differences. (bmj.com)


consistently


  • In addition, women whose first births were later were found to have consistently lower mortality. (bl.uk)


decrease


  • However, mortality did decrease with the number of surviving children. (bl.uk)


Cause


  • 26 ] explored the association of the PA:A ratio and all-cause mortality in a Dutch general population. (ersjournals.com)
  • The aim of this thesis was to examine whether reproductive history was associated with all-cause mortality after age 45 in women and men who had completed their reproduction in Matlab, Bangladesh. (bl.uk)
  • In developed countries, sepsis is an important cause of mortality: in the United States alone, up to 750,000 people annually suffer from severe sepsis-mostly bacterial in aetiology-of whom 29% may die [ 2 , 3 ]. (plos.org)
  • Main outcome measures All-cause mortality at 14 years ascertained through linkage to the Australian National Death Index. (bmj.com)
  • Sinusitis was the commonest infectious cause of mortality or culling, despite medication of the flocks for mycoplasmosis. (bmj.com)
  • Verbal autopsy, an alternative method for collecting mortality data, enables investigators to establish the cause of death retrospectively. (who.int)


risk factor


  • γ-Glutamyltransferase as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease Mortality. (ahajournals.org)


study


  • Noted in the study, however, was that elderly women who napped less than 3 hours per week were not at increased risk of mortality compared to women who did not nap at all. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This study was undertaken to determine the influence of insular damage on the mortality of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). (ahajournals.org)


patients


  • We studied the relation of ECG findings to clinical features on admission and 30-day mortality in 280 patients who were admitted within 6 h from symptom onset and underwent emergency surgery for type A AAD. (ahajournals.org)
  • In patients with type A AAD who underwent emergency surgery, ST↑aVR on admission ECG was the strongest predictor of 30-day mortality. (ahajournals.org)


Americans


  • The latest evidence of this is the Center of Disease's announcement that the average mortality of Americans declined from 7,89. (blogspot.com)


Bangladesh


  • Excess mortality for the unmarried in rural Bangladesh. (ehesp.fr)


India


  • If we want to achieve MDG 4 [Millennium Development Goal regarding child mortality] by 2015, we have to focus on ensuring survival on the first day of birth," Thomas Chandy, CEO of Save the Children, India, said in a statement . (time.com)


indicators


  • Household economic status indicators could account for little of the excess mortality of divorced and never-married individuals relative to their married counterparts. (ehesp.fr)
  • Mortality data are important indicators of population health and are crucial for setting priorities for health interventions and research. (who.int)


higher


  • Comorbid PH independently accounts for worsening dyspnoea, fatigue, impaired exercise tolerance and poor quality of life in COPD [ 7 , 8 ], and is associated with increased risk of hospitalisation and higher mortality [ 2 , 3 , 9 ]. (ersjournals.com)


high


  • Marble spleen disease and pheasant coronavirus-associated nephritis, two viral conditions capable of causing high mortality, were diagnosed in a few birds in 1996 and 1997. (bmj.com)


People


  • By giving more weight to the death of younger people, the premature mortality indicator, along with the self-reported health status indicator , complements the life expectancy indicator , which has sometimes been criticized as placing too much importance on quantity of life and not enough on quality of life. (conferenceboard.ca)


currently


  • Widowed individuals on the other hand had no excess mortality relative to the currently married. (ehesp.fr)


life


  • Premature mortality is a measure of unfulfilled life expectancy . (conferenceboard.ca)


greater


  • Mortality risk greater for elderly women who. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The findings also showed that older women who reported sleeping between 9-10 hours per 24-hour period also had a greater risk of mortality compared to those who slept between 8-9 hours. (bio-medicine.org)
  • After adjustment for age, sex, diagnosis, employment, diabetes and family history, the mortality risk for non-attenders was 58% greater than for attenders (HR=1.58, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.15). (bmj.com)
  • The new Body Shape Index has thus far been reported to predict obesity-related mortality with greater accuracy than the Body Mass Index. (guardianlv.com)


often


  • I've found that these moments, when novels seem to be looking at their own embodiment as books, are often bound with thoughts about time's progress, temporality and mortality. (tufts.edu)


women


  • However, a review of the literature revealed that there was little evidence to suggest that mortality of highly parous women exceeded that of less parous women. (bl.uk)
  • In fact, mortality appeared to be highest in nulliparous women or women with only one birth. (bl.uk)


association


  • The association was strongest for cardiovascular-related mortality. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The association between insular lesions and mortality was investigated by use of logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. (ahajournals.org)


What is the mortality rate of a neck biopsy?


  • I am 20 and having a lymph node biopsy in my neck, neck week Wednesday. My surgeon is taking out the whole lymph node in my neck. What is usually the mortality rate of this kind of stuff? I'm a little worried. I'm actually a nervous about the whole procedure. I never had surgery before. Also are there any tips that can help me relax the day before and the day of the surgery? Also they are using local anesthetics so I won't be asleep.
  • The mortality rate from a procedure like this is not tracked because the procedure is not harmful. Complications can develop from anesthesia or infection, but neither of these have anything to do with this particular procedure. You don't need to worry about relaxing the day of surgery. Usually you will receive a pre-op sedative and by the time you get to the operating room, you won't be aware of hardly anything and you definitely won't be worried. Then, the next you know, an hour or two has passed and the operation is done. If they are using only local anesthetics, that probably means you will receive a drug that is an amnesiac. With this type of drug, you are completely awake, but your short term memory is eliminated, so you have no awareness of what's going on around you.


How do mortality rates get specifically affected by natural disasters?


  • I know that natural disasters can have a huge influence on mortality rates. But, how do these rates get affected specifically by a natural disaster individually? With: - Earthquakes. - Tsunamis. - Floods. - Hurricanes.
  • in earthquakes, the mortality rate is usually, if a large earthquake, high. tsunamis do not produce much mortality, unless it occurs in a poverty struck area. floods, floods can produce massive mortality, as is seen in the pakistani floods, more than 1,300 deceased already. hurricanes do not produce very much mortality, this is because they are easy to predict, and while loss of homes is massive, the people who occupied them have already fled to safety.


How can we work together to reduce child mortality around the world?


  • Worldwide, 10.5 million children under 5 will die this year, most of them die from easily preventable causes. How can we work together to reduce child mortality on a global scale?
  • Child mortality is based on quite a wide and varied number of things. My advice is choose a cause that is contributing to the problem but has meaning for you. Get involed. There are a lot of wonderful organizations doing the work you already care about. Even a monetary contribution would allow these organizations to buy additional vaccine to distribute. The best answer is ... care. When you care you talk (informing others) and give (protecting others). I think it is wonderful that you are thinking this way. Please, do what you can. Have the courage to make a difference, even a small one.


What are the latest mortality, morbidity, incidence rates in australia due to alcohol?


  • im sorry if the question doesnt sound smart, i didnt know how to put it. ahaha i cant find the answer anywhere on the internet. if the question does not make sense, this is whats on my assignment sheet. alcohol abuse - collect the latest australian statistics on mortality, morbidity, incidence and trends over time.
  • The Australian Bureau of Statistics only lists statistics from 2004 - 2005...nice and up to date lol. I found a few websites for 2007 but it looks like all your answers are on the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. http://www.alcohol.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=88 http://www.ama.com.au/node/4762 http://abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/mf/4832.0.55.001/


What are the leading morbidity and mortality cases in the world?


  • the top 10 leading cases of mortality in morbidity in the world. It's our homework in our health care subject.
  • Copied from: http://www.webmd.com/news/20060525/top-10-causes-death-worldwide Top 10 Causes of Death Heart disease and stroke were the leading causes of death in 2001, regardless of countries' incomes, the study shows. However, other leading causes of death differed depending on countries' incomes. Here is the list for high-income countries: 1. Heart disease 2. Stroke 3. Lung cancer 4. Lower respiratory infections 5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 6. Colon and rectum cancers 7. Alzheimer's disease 8. Type 2 diabetes 9. Breast cancer 10. Stomach cancer Here is the list for low- and middle-income countries: 1. Heart disease 2. Stroke 3. Lower respiratory infections 4. HIV/AIDS 5. Fetus/newborn (perinatal) conditions 6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 7. Diarrhea 8. Tuberculosis 9. Malaria 10. Road traffic accidents Just so you know...in the future, Google is your friend. :)


What are the top 10 leading causes of mortality,morbidity,infant mortality & morbidity in the Philippines?


  • Friends, I really need some data about the leading causes in the Philippines. It's for my Health Care subject...The latest data please. Kindly give me the following (Local and National): 1. Top 10 leading causes of mortality 2. Top 10 leading causes of mortality 3. Top 10 leading cause of infant mortality and morbidity thanks guys, kindly include the reference or source.
  • you kidding me?try www.doh.gov.ph


what is the mortality rate for patients with severe sleep apnea?


  • ___ out of ____ people die from severe sleep apnea. (or any other statistics about mortality rate) what is the life expectancy with proper treatment?
  • There is a lot of undiagnosed sleep apnea out there so your first question is difficult to answer. People who fall asleep at the wheel because of sleep apnea and die in a crash would be in a different statistics. People who die of heart disease because of damage from high bp caused by sleep apnea fall in a different category. You second question is also difficult to answer. It depends on when the person was diagnosed and what is their co morbidity's. Does treatment save lives, I would say definitely. It saved mine. I was diagnosed in my 30s and am 100 percent compliant.


What is the general expectency/mortality rate of teenagers?


  • Also, like nowadays, is it common to die before age 20? Like I hear all different stories sometimes, and like with teenagers dying and stuff. What is like the mortality rate of teenagers, like say _/100? Please let me know.
  • teen death rates listed here http://www.kidscount.org/sld/compare_results.jsp?i=100