Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Molecular Typing: Using MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques, such as DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS; PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS; and DNA FINGERPRINTING, to identify, classify, and compare organisms and their subtypes.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Multilocus Sequence Typing: Direct nucleotide sequencing of gene fragments from multiple housekeeping genes for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis, organism identification, and typing of species, strain, serovar, or other distinguishable phylogenetic level.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Cameroon: A republic in central Africa lying east of CHAD and the CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC and west of NIGERIA. The capital is Yaounde.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Minisatellite Repeats: Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Ribotyping: RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM analysis of rRNA genes that is used for differentiating between species or strains.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Caliciviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by CALICIVIRIDAE. They include HEPATITIS E; VESICULAR EXANTHEMA OF SWINE; acute respiratory infections in felines, rabbit hemorrhagic disease, and some cases of gastroenteritis in humans.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Sequence Homology: The degree of similarity between sequences. Studies of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY provide useful information about the genetic relatedness of genes, gene products, and species.Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique: Technique that utilizes low-stringency polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with single primers of arbitrary sequence to generate strain-specific arrays of anonymous DNA fragments. RAPD technique may be used to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyze mixed genome samples, and create specific probes.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Klebsiella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus KLEBSIELLA.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Klebsiella pneumoniae: Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.TaiwanEscherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.ItalyRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Norovirus: A genus in the family CALICIVIRIDAE, associated with epidemic GASTROENTERITIS in humans. The type species, NORWALK VIRUS, contains multiple strains.United StatesSpain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Acinetobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACINETOBACTER.Carrier State: The condition of harboring an infective organism without manifesting symptoms of infection. The organism must be readily transmissible to another susceptible host.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Adenovirus Infections, Human: Respiratory and conjunctival infections caused by 33 identified serotypes of human adenoviruses.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.ArgentinaHemodialysis Units, Hospital: Hospital units in which care is provided the hemodialysis patient. This includes hemodialysis centers in hospitals.Astroviridae Infections: Infections with ASTROVIRUS, causing gastroenteritis in human infants, calves, lambs, and piglets.DNA, Protozoan: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.BrazilAnimals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Sapovirus: A genus of the family CALICIVIRIDAE associated with worldwide sporadic outbreaks of GASTROENTERITIS in humans. The first recorded outbreak was in human infants in Sapporo, Japan in 1977. The genus is comprised of a single species, Sapporo virus, containing multiple strains.pol Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Proteins encoded by the POL GENE of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mycological Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of fungi.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Dysentery, Bacillary: DYSENTERY caused by gram-negative rod-shaped enteric bacteria (ENTEROBACTERIACEAE), most often by the genus SHIGELLA. Shigella dysentery, Shigellosis, is classified into subgroups according to syndrome severity and the infectious species. Group A: SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE (severest); Group B: SHIGELLA FLEXNERI; Group C: SHIGELLA BOYDII; and Group D: SHIGELLA SONNEI (mildest).Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.beta-Lactam Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of the beta-lactam antibiotics. Mechanisms responsible for beta-lactam resistance may be degradation of antibiotics by BETA-LACTAMASES, failure of antibiotics to penetrate, or low-affinity binding of antibiotics to targets.ColombiaDisease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.IsraelMamastrovirus: A genus of small, circular RNA viruses in the family ASTROVIRIDAE. They cause GASTROENTERITIS and are found in the stools of several vertebrates including humans. Transmission is by the fecal-oral route and there are at least eight human serotypes. The type species is Human astrovirus.Rabies virus: The type species of LYSSAVIRUS causing rabies in humans and other animals. Transmission is mostly by animal bites through saliva. The virus is neurotropic multiplying in neurons and myotubes of vertebrates.Community-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Enterobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.Acinetobacter baumannii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, commonly found in the clinical laboratory, and frequently resistant to common antibiotics.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Epidemics: Sudden outbreaks of a disease in a country or region not previously recognized in that area, or a rapid increase in the number of new cases of a previous existing endemic disease. Epidemics can also refer to outbreaks of disease in animal or plant populations.Nasopharynx: The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Pneumococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Tunisia: A country in northern Africa between ALGERIA and LIBYA. Its capital is Tunis.Rotavirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.IndiaDiarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.EuropeDrug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).JapanRespiratory Syncytial Virus, Human: The type species of PNEUMOVIRUS and an important cause of lower respiratory disease in infants and young children. It frequently presents with bronchitis and bronchopneumonia and is further characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, wheezing, and pallor.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.HungaryHepatitis A virus: A species in the genus HEPATOVIRUS containing one serotype and two strains: HUMAN HEPATITIS A VIRUS and Simian hepatitis A virus causing hepatitis in humans (HEPATITIS A) and primates, respectively.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Methicillin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Rabies: Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.Disease Transmission, Infectious: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Conjunctivitis, Viral: Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.AfricaStaphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Thailand: Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Algeria: A country in northern Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between MOROCCO and TUNISIA. Its capital is Algiers.Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.Impetigo: A common superficial bacterial infection caused by STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS or group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Characteristics include pustular lesions that rupture and discharge a thin, amber-colored fluid that dries and forms a crust. This condition is commonly located on the face, especially about the mouth and nose.Military Facilities: Areas designated for use by the armed forces personnel.Corynebacterium diphtheriae: A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria in which three cultural types are recognized. These types (gravis, intermedius, and mitis) were originally given in accordance with the clinical severity of the cases from which the different strains were most frequently isolated. This species is the causative agent of DIPHTHERIA.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Interspersed Repetitive Sequences: Copies of transposable elements interspersed throughout the genome, some of which are still active and often referred to as "jumping genes". There are two classes of interspersed repetitive elements. Class I elements (or RETROELEMENTS - such as retrotransposons, retroviruses, LONG INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS and SHORT INTERSPERSED NUCLEOTIDE ELEMENTS) transpose via reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. Class II elements (or DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS - such as transposons, Tn elements, insertion sequence elements and mobile gene cassettes of bacterial integrons) transpose directly from one site in the DNA to another.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Vancomycin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of VANCOMYCIN, an inhibitor of cell wall synthesis.Caliciviridae: A family of RNA viruses infecting a broad range of animals. Most individual species are restricted to their natural hosts. They possess a characteristic six-pointed starlike shape whose surfaces have cup-shaped (chalice) indentions. Transmission is by contaminated food, water, fomites, and occasionally aerosolization of secretions. Genera include LAGOVIRUS; NORWALK-LIKE VIRUSES; SAPPORO-LIKE VIRUSES; and VESIVIRUS.Middle East: The region of southwest Asia and northeastern Africa usually considered as extending from Libya on the west to Afghanistan on the east. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Bias (Epidemiology): Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.Carbapenems: A group of beta-lactam antibiotics in which the sulfur atom in the thiazolidine ring of the penicillin molecule is replaced by a carbon atom. THIENAMYCINS are a subgroup of carbapenems which have a sulfur atom as the first constituent of the side chain.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Shigella sonnei: A lactose-fermenting bacterium causing dysentery.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.GreeceHIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Salmonella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.PhilippinesDengue Virus: A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.Carbon-Oxygen Ligases: Enzymes that catalyze the joining of two molecules by the formation of a carbon-oxygen bond. EC 6.1.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.BelgiumLeukocidins: Pore forming proteins originally discovered for toxic activity to LEUKOCYTES. They are EXOTOXINS produced by some pathogenic STAPHYLOCOCCUS and STREPTOCOCCUS that destroy leukocytes by lysis of the cytoplasmic granules and are partially responsible for the pathogenicity of the organisms.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Ampicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of a microbe to the action of ampicillin, a penicillin derivative that interferes with cell wall synthesis.French Guiana: A French overseas department on the northeast coast of South America. Its capital is Cayenne. It was first settled by the French in 1604. Early development was hindered because of the presence of a penal colony. The name of the country and the capital are variants of Guyana, possibly from the native Indian Guarani guai (born) + ana (kin), implying a united and interrelated race of people. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p418 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p195)Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Germany, WestEnterovirus InfectionsRuminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Hepatitis A: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the HEPATOVIRUS genus, HUMAN HEPATITIS A VIRUS. It can be transmitted through fecal contamination of food or water.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Diphtheria: A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane at the site of infection. DIPHTHERIA TOXIN, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Cryptococcus gattii: A species of the fungus CRYPTOCOCCUS. Its teleomorph is Filobasidiella bacillispora.Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Peliosis Hepatis: A vascular disease of the LIVER characterized by the occurrence of multiple blood-filled CYSTS or cavities. The cysts are lined with ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; the cavities lined with hepatic parenchymal cells (HEPATOCYTES). Peliosis hepatis has been associated with use of anabolic steroids (ANABOLIC AGENTS) and certain drugs.Queensland: A state in northeastern Australia. Its capital is Brisbane. Its coast was first visited by Captain Cook in 1770 and its first settlement (penal) was located on Moreton Bay in 1824. The name Cooksland was first proposed but honor to Queen Victoria prevailed. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p996 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p441)Great BritainGambia: A republic in western Africa, constituting an enclave within SENEGAL extending on both sides of the Gambia River. Its capital is Banjul, formerly Bathurst.Carcinogens, Environmental: Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment.Enterococcus faecium: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms are normal flora of the intestinal tract. Unlike ENTEROCOCCUS FAECALIS, this species may produce an alpha-hemolytic reaction on blood agar and is unable to utilize pyruvic acid as an energy source.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.MexicoConfounding Factors (Epidemiology): Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.Hepatitis C: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.PakistanEmigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Contact Tracing: Identification of those persons (or animals) who have had such an association with an infected person, animal, or contaminated environment as to have had the opportunity to acquire the infection. Contact tracing is a generally accepted method for the control of sexually transmitted diseases.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Echovirus Infections: Infectious disease processes, including meningitis, diarrhea, and respiratory disorders, caused by echoviruses.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Integrons: DNA elements that include the component genes and insertion site for a site-specific recombination system that enables them to capture mobile gene cassettes.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.VenezuelaRussia

*  Molecular signaling pathways of diabetic kidney disease; new concepts |...
Molecular signaling pathways of diabetic kidney disease; new concepts ... Journal of Preventive Epidemiology follows;. http://publicationethics.org/resources/ ......
http://jprevepi.com/index.php/JPR/article/view/260/304
*  Molecular signaling pathways of diabetic kidney disease; new concepts |...
Molecular signaling pathways of diabetic kidney disease; new concepts ... Journal of Preventive Epidemiology follows;. http://publicationethics.org/resources/ ... Molecular signaling pathways of diabetic kidney disease; new concepts. Esmat Aghadavoud, ... Citation: Aghadavoud E, Nasri H, Amiri M. Molecular signaling pathways of diabetic kidney ......
http://jprevepi.com/index.php/JPR/article/view/260/284
*  Systematic selection of screening participants by risk score in a chlamydia...
epidemiology (molecular). *chlamydia infection. Introduction. Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) ... 1Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National ... Correspondence to Dr Ingrid V F van den Broek, Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, Centre ......
http://sti.bmj.com/content/88/3/205
*  CHILDREN INFECTED WITH HIV-1 NON-B SUBTYPES: PHARMACOGENETICS RESEARCH NEEDS...
2HIV-1 Molecular Epidemiology Group, Ramón Y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. ......
http://adc.bmj.com/content/93/Suppl_2/pw316
*  Biology-Online • View topic - Theories - Origin of Life
Tetracycline antibiotics: mode of action, applications, molecular biology, and ... epidemiology of bacterial resistance.. It notes. Tetracycline resistance is often due to ......
http://biology-online.org/biology-forum/about14351.html?p=144426&hilit=Books
*  Does HIV status affect the aetiology, bacterial resistance patterns and...
Clinical and molecular epidemiology of community-onset, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase- ... epidemiology and risk factors for mortality.European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and ... Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar typhi in asia and molecular ......
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tmi.12060/full?globalMessage=0
*  European Commission : CORDIS : Projects and Results : Final Report Summary -...
... including Introduction to Molecular Epidemiology, Good Laboratory Practice in Biobanking ... The first formal Graduate School in Biobank-based Epidemiology was established as a part ... greatly impact the building of a uniquely large infrastructure for molecular epidemiology ... Genetic Epidemiology and a CCPRB Biobank Conference. Finally, the first practical hands- ......
http://cordis.europa.eu/result/rcn/51674_en.html
*  Leading researchers honored for progress in cancer prevention, detection and......
... the molecular epidemiology of cancer, and more recently, anti-cancer drug development and ... molecular genetics, molecular biology and reproductive sciences at the University of ... A renowned molecular biologist, Brenner helped to define this field of cancer research ... Robert N. Hoover, M.D., Sc.D., S.M.Hyg., director of the epidemiology and biostatistics ......
http://bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-1/Leading-researchers-honored-for-progress-in-cancer-prevention--detection-and-treatment-14023-1/
*  The Lethal Phenotype of Cancer: The Molecular Basis of Death Due to Malignancy ...
Epidemiology and management of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer. Thromb Res ... The Molecular Concepts Map. The Molecular Concepts Map (MCM) is a bioinformatics platform ... Molecular portraits and the family tree of cancer. Nat Genet 2002; 32(Suppl):533-540. * ... A molecular signature of metastasis in primary solid tumors. Nat Genet 2003; 33:49-54. * ......
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/canjclin.57.4.225/full?globalMessage=0
*  Transient Acantholytic Dermatosis: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology
... and Molecular Medicine and Translational Science, Wake Forest Baptist Health; Director, ... Epidemiology. Frequency. Exact numbers regarding the prevalence of transient acantholytic ......
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1124347-overview
*  Molecular epidemiology
... In 1993, around the same time as Schulte and Perera published their book, there was also the formation of the International Molecular Epidemiology Task Force IMETAF. 6 Another example, which also reflects how the field of Cancer Research has probably been the most proactive in embracing the term Molecular Epidemiology in a broadest sense was the formation around the same time of Molecular Epidemiology Group of the American Association of Cancer Research MEG/AACR.,. Conceptually, each individual has a unique disease process different from any other individual "the unique disease principle", Ogino S, Lochhead P, Chan AT, Nishihara R, Cho E, Wolpin BM, Meyerhardt AJ, Meissner A, Schernhammer ES, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci E. considering uniqueness of the exposome and its unique influence on molecular pathologic process in each individual. Interdisciplinary education to integrate pathology and epidemiology: Towards molecular and population-level health science. Furthermore, the concept of disease heterogeneity ap...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molecular_epidemiology
*  Molecular Epidemiology of NHL and CLL (Supplement 1 to R01 CA92153) - Epidemiology of Lymphoma an
Molecular Epidemiology of NHL and CLL Supplement 1 to R01 CA92153 - Epidemiology of Lymphoma and Leukemia Research Program - Mayo Clinic Research. Patient Care & Health Info. Quality Care Find out why Mayo Clinic is the right place for your health care. Departments & Centers. Medical Departments & Centers. Research Centers & Programs. About Mayo Clinic. Meet the Staff Find a directory of doctors and departments at all Mayo Clinic campuses. Find Clinical Trials. Search Publications. Research and Clinical Trials See how Mayo Clinic research and clinical trials advance the science of medicine and improve patient care. Mayo Medical School. Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. Professional Services Explore Mayo Clinic’s many resources and see jobs available for medical professionals. Products & Services. Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Medical Products. Continuing Education for Medical Professionals. Giving to Mayo Clinic. Centers and Programs Epidemiology of Lymphoma and Leukemia Research Program. Faculty and St...
http://mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/epidemiology-lymphoma-leukemia-research-program/for-researchers/molecular-epidemiology-nhl-cll-supplement-1-r01-ca92153
*  Search › clinical epidemiology | Quizlet
Search clinical epidemiology. Quizlet. . Quizlet. . .  Create a Study Set. Log In .  Log In with Google.  Log In with Facebook. Keep me logged in. Forgot password. Forgot password. Sign Up.  Google Sign In Give us Feedback. If you re having trouble, want to report a bug, provide a suggestion, or just want to say hello please fill out the form below. Choose Type Question / Need Help Suggestion Bug Report Just Saying Thanks Other Comment / Feedback. clinical epidemiology.  215 Study Sets 215 Sets.  1 Class.  38 Users.  0 Definitions 0 Defs. Image sets only. Clinical Epidemiology Test 1. 19 terms By cepps1989 . 19 terms Preview . Clinical Epidemiology Test 3. 9 terms By cepps1989 . 9 terms Preview . Clinical Epidemiology. 77 terms Preview . Clinical Epidemiology. 29 terms Preview . Theresa McCann - Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence based Medicine. 22 terms By brandonng ...
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*  ESCAIDE
The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control ECDC organizes the event in partnership with the European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training EPIET, the EPIET Alumni network EAN and TEPHINET EUROPE Training Programs in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network. strengthening and expanding the network of all those involved in applied infectious disease epidemiology; sharing scientific knowledge and experience in this field in Europe and internationally; and providing a dedicated platform for fellows of the EPIET/ FETP field epidemiology training program to present their work. The Conference is aimed at junior and senior experts from in all fields of communicable disease surveillance, prevention and control. This includes epidemiologists, microbiologists, clinicians, public health experts, and veterinary and environmental health experts with a professional and scientific interest in applied infectious disease epidemiology. http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/aboutus/Pages/aboutus.aspx ECDC i...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ESCAIDE
*  Epidemic Intelligence Service
... The 'Epidemic Intelligence Service' 'EIS' is a program of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC. It is the prototype for Field Epidemiology Training Programs FETP, which can now be found in numerous countries, reflecting the example set by this training model and the technical assistance provided by CDC in helping to set them up. The EIS program is now run through the CDC's Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services CSELS, in the Office of Public Health Scientific Services OPHSS. Persons participating in the program, popularly called '"disease detectives"', are called "EIS officers" or EIS fellows by the CDC and have been dispatched to investigate possible epidemics, due to both natural and artificial causes, including anthrax, hantavirus, and West Nile virus in the United States and Ebola in Uganda and Zaire. Since the establishment of the EIS in 1951, over 3,000 EIS officers have been involved in response efforts in the US and worldwide. EIS officers have been involv...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidemic_Intelligence_Service
*  Yuuki Tsuchihashi
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts Tsuchihashi Yuuki Tsuchihashi. Research Topics seasons odds ratio influenza vaccines humidity temperature protective clothing seroepidemiologic studies hemagglutination inhibition tests infection control health personnel. Yuuki Tsuchihashi Summary. Publications Association between seasonal influenza vaccination in 2008-2009 and pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 infection among school students from Kobe, Japan, April-June 2009 Yuuki Tsuchihashi Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan Clin Infect Dis 54:381-3. 2012 Environmental factors and seasonal influenza onset in Okayama city, Japan: case-crossover study Yuuki Tsuchihashi Department of Epidemiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700 8558, Japan Acta Med Okayama 65:97-103. 2011 Seroprevalence of antibodies to pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus among health care workers in two general hospitals aft...
http://labome.org/expert/tsuchihashi/yuuki-tsuchihashi-1706239.html
*  FETP
Field Epidemiology involves the application of epidemiologic methods to unexpected health problems when a rapid, on-site investigation is necessary for timely intervention. Oxford University Press. Oxford University Press. 'Field Epidemiology Training Programs' 'FETPs' are two-year applied public health training programs modeled after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 's CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service EIS. The other 75 percent of their time is spent in field placements, where residents "learn by doing," by participating in outbreak investigations, helping to establish and evaluate disease surveillance systems, designing and conducting studies on problems of public health concern in their country, and training other healthcare workers. FETP residents have been involved in initiatives to prevent and control infectious diseases of global health importance, including polio, cholera, tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, and emerging infectious diseases of animal origin e.g., SARS, Nipah virus, and avia...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FETP
*  .. Panel to Discuss U.S. Epidemic Intelligence Service .. Post navigation
panel to discuss u s epidemic intelligence service by jennifer nachbur since â an elite group of public health officers â called the epidemic intelligence service eis â has been charged withâ investigating and identifyingâ disease epidemics a program of the u s centers for disease control and prevention these specially trained detectives have solved such medical mysteries asâ reye s syndrome and legionnairesâ disease and helped to eliminate wild polio and eradicate smallpox and save countless lives in the process the uvm community and members of the public can learn all about the eis at investigating outbreaks the epidemic intelligence service a talk by mark pendergrast author of inside the outbreaks the elite medical detectives of the epidemic intelligence service houghton mifflin harcourt and a panel of former eis officers now working in vermont the event will take place at the university of vermont college of medicine medical education center in the sullivan classroom room from â p m a reception and book s...
http://library.uvm.edu/dana/news/?p=2048
*  Mort Levin and the Emergence of Chronic Disease Epidemiology : Epidemiology
... Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Epidemiology Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Login. Open Access. Rights and Permissions. November 2007 - Volume 18 - Issue 6. Mort Levin and the Emergence of Chronic Disease Epidemiology. Previous Article. Next Article. Mort Levin and the Emergence of Chronic Disease Epidemiology Winkelstein, Warren Jr. Mort Levin made three major contributions to public health. Under Levin's leadership, the Commission expanded the scope of public health from a narrowly-focused emphasis on the control of infectious diseases to a concern with the full spectrum of disease occurrence. 3 His third contribution was the 1950 publication of his case-control study of smoking and lung cancer 4 which, along with simultaneous studies by Wynder and Graham 5 and Dol...
http://journals.lww.com/epidem/Fulltext/2007/11000/Mort_Levin_and_the_Emergence_of_Chronic_Disease.29.aspx
*  CDC A-Z Index - F
... Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content. Start of Search Controls. Search Form Controls. TOPIC ONLY. cancel. submit. Search The CDC. CDC A-Z Index. MENU. CDC A-Z. SEARCH. A B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. #. Search Form Controls. Search The CDC. submit. CDC A-Z Index. Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov. A B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. #. F. Fainting after Vaccination. Falls – Injury Prevention. Falls Among Older Adults, Cost of see Cost of Falls Among Older Adults. Falls, Older Adults. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act FERPA see Privacy Legislation and Regulations. Family Health. Family Health History. Family Health History and Breast and Ovarian Cancer see Breast and Ovar...
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*  Centers Disease Control Prevention
... News Events World Regions Global Health Topics Global Programs Initiatives About Us. Centers Disease Control Prevention. Centers Disease Control Prevention. Centers Disease Control Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC Activities The United States and China sponsor a Joint Initiative on Avian Influenza. and China cooperation on human and animal health, and on regional and international cooperation. In FY 2008, CDC awarded $2.7 million to the China CDC to support work on avian influenza and human seasonal influenza in China. The work covers the full spectrum of influenza work, including: Laboratory Epidemiology Surveillance Environmental assessments Vaccine use and assessment Pandemic preparedness Outbreak detection and response The goal is to prevent and control seasonal flu and bird flu in humans. The cooperative agreements specifically support surveillance, outbreak detection and response, and all laboratory support for these activities. Support includes funds for the Chinese Field ...
http://globalhealth.gov/world-regions/asia-and-pacific/china/centers-disease-control-prevention/
*  Kow Tong Chen
National Cheng Kung University Chen Kow Tong Chen. 2009 Chlamydial infection among patients attending STD and genitourinary clinics in Taiwan Kow Tong Chen Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan BMC Public Health 7:120. 2007 Hospital-based study of the economic burden associated with rotavirus diarrhea in Taiwan Kow Tong Chen Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan Vaccine 25:4266-72. 2007 Sentinel hospital surveillance for rotavirus diarrhea in Taiwan, 2001-2003 Kow Tong Chen Field Epidemiology Training Program, Center for Disease Control, Department of Health, Taipei, Taiwan J Infect Dis 192:S44-8. Chlamydial infection among patients attending STD and genitourinary clinics in Taiwan Kow Tong Chen Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan BMC Public Health 7:120. Hospital-based study of the economic burden associated with rotavirus diarrhea in Taiwa...
http://labome.org/expert/taiwan/national/chen/kow-tong-chen-835523.html
*  Becca Levy, PhD > Chronic Disease Epidemiology | Yale School of Public HealthDecrease font sizeReset
Becca Levy, PhD > Chronic Disease Epidemiology. Yale School of Public Health. Yale School of Public Health. Chronic Disease Epidemiology. PhD in Chronic Disease Epi. PhD in Chronic Disease Epi. Becca Levy, PhD Associate Professor of Epidemiology Chronic Diseases and of Psychology Biography. Research Interests Aging; Environment and Public Health; Mental Health; Psychological Phenomena and Processes; Social Sciences; Psychiatry and Psychology. Research Organizations School of Public Health : Chronic Disease Epidemiology : Social & Behavioral Sciences. Research Summary Professor Levy's research explores psychosocial influences on aging. Her studies focus on how psychological factors, particularly older individuals' perceptions of aging, affect cognition and health in old age. She studies this by examining: 1 how psychosocial factors influence recovery and survival in old age; 2 how the aging process differs in cultures that hold diverse views of aging; and 3 how interventions, designed to trigger either positiv...
http://medicine.yale.edu/ysph/cde/people/becca_levy-2.profile
*  JCI - Inside the outbreaks: The elite medical detectives of the epidemic intelligence service
... Current Issue. Past Issues. Videos Conversations with Giants in Medicine Author's Takes. Reviews. Reviews View all reviews... Collections Recently published Commentaries Editorials Hindsight The Attending Physician First Author Perspectives Scientific Show Stoppers Opinion Top read articles. Clinical Medicine JCI This Month Current issue Past issues. About For authors Current issue Past issues By specialty Subscribe Alerts Advertise Contact us Videos Conversations with Giants in Medicine Author's Takes Collections Commentaries Editorials Hindsight Review series Reviews The Attending Physician First Author Perspectives Scientific Show Stoppers Top read articles. E-mail the JCI. Inside the outbreaks: The elite medical detectives of the epidemic intelligence service. in: JCI. First published August 2, 2010 - More info. Published in Volume 120, Issue 8 August 2, 2010. Published August 2, 2010. Book Review. EIS. Neither does Mark Pendergrast tell the history of EIS in Inside the Outbreaks — although i...
http://jci.org/articles/view/43893
*  Epidemic Intelligence Service|CDC
... Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content. Start of Search Controls. Search Form Controls. Search The CDC Cancel. Submit Search The CDC. CDC A-Z Index. MENU. CDC A-Z. SEARCH. A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. #. Start of Search Controls. Search Form Controls. Search The CDC Cancel. Submit Search The CDC. Epidemic Intelligence Service. Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov. Recommend on Facebook. Tweet. Share Compartir. EIS officers Barbara Knust and Ilana Schafer, along with EIS alum Richard Besser, during a 2012 Ebola outbreak in Uganda. EIS officer Ishani Pathmanathan interviews the nurse in charge at Karibib Health Center in Namibia about a TB/HIV program. EIS officer Ilana Schafer walks to the Kagadi Hospital in the Kibaa...
http://cdc.gov/eis/index.html
*  Multiple Outbreaks of Kawasaki Syndrome -- United States
Reported by M Glode, MD, The Children's Hospital, J Wiggins, MD, University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver, R Hopkins, MD, Communicable Disease Control, Colorado Dept of Health; P Pappas, MD, Wilmington, D Kredich, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, D Ingram, MD, R Warren, MD, University of North Carolina Medical Center, Chapel Hill, A Askew, MD, Raleigh, T McCutchen, Jr, MD, Fayetteville, N Patrone, MD, Greenville, J MacCormack, MD, State Epidemiologist, Div of Health Svcs, North Carolina Dept of Human Resources; L Branch, G Miller, Jr, MD, State Epidemiologist, Virginia State Dept of Health; R Wientzen, MD, Georgetown University Medical Center, B Wiedermann, MD, Children's Hospital National Medical Center, M Levy, MD, State Epidemiologist, District of Columbia Dept of Human Svcs; G Gallemore, MD, Quillen Dishner School of Medicine, Johnson City, F Barrett, MD, LeBonheur Hospital, Memphis, R Hutcheson, Jr, MD, State Epidemiologist, Tennessee State Dept of Health and Environment; J Burns, MD, J Newbe...
http://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000470.htm
*  Harvey A Risch, MD, PhD > Chronic Disease Epidemiology | Yale School of Public HealthDecrease font s
Harvey A Risch, MD, PhD > Chronic Disease Epidemiology. Yale School of Public Health. Information For. Prospective Students. Current Students. Faculty. Administrators. Search. Yale School of Public Health. Chronic Disease Epidemiology. Contact Us. Academic Programs. News. Research. Faculty. MPH in Chronic Disease Epi. Social and Behavioral Sciences. MS in Chronic Disease Epi. PhD in Chronic Disease Epi. Publications. . Home. Contact Us. Academic Programs. MPH in Chronic Disease Epi. Curriculum. Internships. Thesis Topics. Employment Metrics. Competencies. Global Health Concentration. Regulatory Affairs Track. Social and Behavioral Sciences. MS in Chronic Disease Epi. Degree Requirements. Career Paths. Competencies. Apply. PhD in Chronic Disease Epi. Degree Requirments. Research. Funding Training Grants. Competencies. Current PhD Students. Apply. News. Research. Publications. Faculty. share. tweet. email. print. Decrease font size. Reset font size. Increase font size. Harvey A Risch, MD, PhD Professor of Epide...
http://medicine.yale.edu/ysph/cde/people/harvey_risch-2.profile
*  I C Arts
Publications Catechin intake might explain the inverse relation between tea consumption and ischemic heart disease: the Zutphen Elderly Study I C Arts National Institute of Public Health and the Environment RIVM, Division of Public Health Research, Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, Bilthoven, Netherlands Am J Clin Nutr 74:227-32. 2001 Dietary catechins and cancer incidence among postmenopausal women: the Iowa Women's Health Study United States Ilja C W Arts National Institute of Public Health and the Environment RIVM, Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, Bilthoven, The Netherlands Cancer Causes Control 13:373-82. 2001 Dietary catechins and epithelial cancer incidence: the Zutphen elderly study I C Arts National Institute of Public Health and the Environment RIVM, Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, PO Box 1, NL 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands Int J Cancer 92:298-302. Detail Information Publications 17 Catechin intake might explain the inverse relation between tea consumption and...
http://labome.org/expert/the/wageningen/arts/i-c-arts-572936.html
*  Meningitis: State epidemiologist says 25 clinic patients being evaluated - TwinCities.com
... A 'church torn apart'. Font Resize Meningitis: State epidemiologist says 25 clinic patients being evaluated By Martiga Lohn Associated Press Posted: 10/05/2012 12:01:00 AM CDT Updated: 10/06/2012 10:24:22 AM CDT. About 25 Minnesotans who were injected with a steroid from a Massachusetts specialty pharmacy are being evaluated for fungal meningitis in an outbreak that has killed five and sickened 30 in six states, Minnesota's top disease investigator said Friday. State epidemiologist Ruth Lynfield said the number of those being evaluated is likely to fluctuate as health officials and a group of Minnesota pain clinics track down about 700 patients who received spinal injections of the steroid linked to the outbreak. Two Minnesota clinic chains used the now-recalled product -- Medical Advanced Pain Specialists in Edina, Fridley, Shakopee and Maple Grove; and the Minnesota Surgery Center in Edina and Maple Grove. "There's a massive effort to contact all the patients," said Marsha Thiel, chief executive office...
http://twincities.com/localnews/ci_21706503/meningitis-clinic-ceo-says-4-have-symptoms
*  CDC Global Health - South Africa - Jobs and Opportunities
... Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content. Start of Search Controls. Search Form Controls. Search The CDC Cancel. Submit Search The CDC. CDC A-Z Index. MENU. CDC A-Z. SEARCH. A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. #. Start of Search Controls. Search Form Controls. Search The CDC Cancel. Submit Search The CDC. Global Health - South Africa. Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov. CDC in South Africa. Why We're Here. What CDC Is Doing. Global HIV/AIDS TB. HIV/AIDS Care Treatment. Antiretroviral Treatment Services. Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission. TB HIV. HIV Care Support. Epidemiology and Strategic Information Branch. Epidemiology Training. Epidemiology Lab Capacity. Health Systems Strengthening ...
http://cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/southafrica/opportunities/default.htm
*  CDC Global Health - South Africa - CDC's HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Programs
... Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content. Start of Search Controls. Submit Search The CDC. CDC A-Z Index. CDC A-Z. Start of Search Controls. Submit Search The CDC. Global Health - South Africa. CDC in South Africa. What CDC Is Doing. Global HIV/AIDS TB. HIV/AIDS Care Treatment. Antiretroviral Treatment Services. TB HIV. HIV Care Support. Epidemiology and Strategic Information Branch. Epidemiology Training. HIV Prevention. South Africa Regional Global Disease Detection Center. South Africa Field Epidemiology Training Program. One Health Program. CDC Global Health Newsletter Get CDC’s free global health newsletter each week. Enter your email address: Enter Email Address. Submit. Submit Button. Global Health. CDC's HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Programs in South Africa. CDC South Africa's Care and Treatment portfolio includes HIV and AIDS and tuberculosis programs. However, the 2012 HSRC Report recommends t...
http://cdc.gov/globalhealth/countries/southafrica/what/hiv_aids_treatment.htm
*  GAO-08-138T, Global Health: U.S. Agencies Support Programs to Build Overseas Capacity for Infectious
... Disease Surveillance. agencies operate or support four key programs aimed at building overseas surveillance capacity for infectious diseases: Global Disease Detection GDD, operated by CDC; Field Epidemiology Training Programs FETP, supported by CDC and USAID; Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response IDSR, supported by CDC and USAID; and Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System GEIS, operated by DOD. Obligations for Programs Supporting Capacity Building for Infectious Disease Surveillance, 2004-2006 Dollars in millions : Program: GDD; Agency: CDC; Obligations: 2004: $6; Obligations: 2005: $11; Obligations: 2006: $14; Obligations: Amounts provided only as 2004-2006 aggregates: ; Obligations: Total: $31. Program: FETP; Agency: CDC ; Obligations: 2004: 2; Obligations: 2005: 2; Obligations: 2006: 3; Obligations: Amounts provided only as 2004-2006 aggregates: ; Obligations: Total: $7. Program: FETP; Agency: : USAID; Obligations: 2004: 2; Obligations: 2005: 3; Obligations: 2006: 1; Obliga...
http://gao.gov/assets/120/117989.html
*  U.S. GAO - Global Health: U.S. Agencies Support Programs to Build Overseas Capacity for Infectious D
GAO - Global Health: U.S. Agencies Support Programs to Build Overseas Capacity for Infectious Disease Surveillance. Bid Protests Appropriations Law. Key Issues. Global Health: U.S. Agencies Support Programs to Build Overseas Capacity for Infectious Disease Surveillance GAO-08-138T: Published: Oct 4, 2007. Agency for International Development USAID, and the Department of Defense DOD --support programs aimed at building this broader capacity to detect a variety of infectious diseases. government operates or supports four key programs aimed at building overseas surveillance capacity for infectious diseases. Global Disease Detection is CDC's main effort to help build capacity for infectious disease surveillance in developing countries. The Field Epidemiology Training Programs, which CDC and USAID support, are another tool used to help build infectious disease surveillance capacity worldwide. Additionally, USAID supports CDC and the World Health Organization's Regional Office for Africa in designing and implementi...
http://gao.gov/products/GAO-08-138T
*  IDSC Infectious Disease Surveillance Center
... goto niid about idsc quotation links sitemap apr measles notified cases in japan week mar iasr vol no hand foot and mouth disease in japan mar iasr flash report of measles virus in japan mar measles notified cases in japan week mar iasr flash report of norovirus in japan season mar iasr antiviral resistance surveillance of influenza virus in japan mar idwr annual surveillance data go archives idwr infectious diseases weekly report iasr infectious agents surveillance report seroepi national surveillance of vaccine preventable diseases field epidemiology training program japan measles ministry of health labour and welfare who geneva who wpro cdc copyright infectious disease surveillance center all rights reserved...
http://idsc.nih.go.jp/index.html
*  Addressing the Challenges of Noncommunicable Diseases
Main U.S. Department of State. + The Secretary. + Policy Issues. Democracy and Human Rights. Energy Security. Health. Daily Press Briefings. Press Releases and Special Briefings. Key Policy Fact Sheets. Countries and Regions - Main. UN and Other International Organizations. Department of State by State. Economics, Energy and Environment - Main. Economic and Business Affairs. Commercial and Business Affairs Office. + Arms Control and International Security. Arms Control and International Security - Main. Arms Control. Noncommunicable diseases have emerged as growing health problems for countries in every corner of the globe. Noncommunicable diseases NCDs, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes, represent an urgent and growing global public health emergency. Cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes are the NCDs responsible for the greatest number of deaths worldwide. The four major behavioral risk factors tobacco usage, alcohol abuse, inac...
http://m.state.gov/md172542.htm
*  PLOS ONE: Hypoglycemia and Death in Mice Following Experimental Exposure to an Extract of Trogia ven
... enata Mushrooms. Advertisement. plos.org. create account. sign in. PLOS ONE. Publish. Submissions. Getting Started. Submission Guidelines. Figures. Tables. Supporting Information. LaTeX. Revising Your Manuscript. Submit Now. Policies. Best Practices in Research Reporting. Human Subjects Research. Animal Research. Competing Interests. Disclosure of Funding Sources. Content License. Data Availability. Materials and Software Sharing. Ethical Publishing Practice. Manuscript Review and Publication. Criteria for Publication. Editorial and Peer Review Process. Reviewer Guidelines. Accepted Manuscripts. Corrections and Retractions. Comments. Article-Level Metrics. Submit Your Manuscript Discover a faster, simpler path to publishing in a high-quality journal. PLOS ONE promises fair, rigorous peer review, broad scope, and wide readership – a perfect fit for your research every time. Learn More. Submit Now. About. Why Publish with PLOS ONE. Journal Information. Editorial Board. Section Editors. Advisory Groups. Publ...
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0038712
*  CDC Media Relations: MMWR News Synopsis for June 4, 1999
... . Media Home. Contact Us. Press Summaries. June 4, 1999. MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday. . . Cities, 1991-1997. . Notices to Readers: Changes in National Notifiable Diseases Data Presentation. Click here for MMWR home page. Synopsis June 4, 1999. . PRESS CONTACT: David Swerdlow, M.D. CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases 404 639-2206 In April 1998, the Thailand Ministry of Public Health identified an outbreak of botulism caused by consumption of contaminated home-canned bamboo shoots. Botulism is a rare, but serious, paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin. Bacterial spores that survive an inadequate cooking and canning process grow and produce toxin in the low oxygen environment of the canned food. Although botulism has long been recognized and confirmed in the United States and other developed countries, this is the first confirmed outbreak of botulism in Thailand. Thailand's Field Epidemiology Training Program served a critical role in the investigation, con...
http://cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/1999/n990604.htm
*  C M Oomen
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts The Netherlands. National Institute for Public Health and the Environment Oomen C M Oomen. Research Topics fish oils coronary disease cohort studies diet arginine fatty acids analysis of variance alpha linolenic acid blood pressure cholesterol incidence dietary fats lipoproteins regression analysis seroepidemiologic studies alcohol drinking smoking body mass index netherlands. C M Oomen Summary Affiliation: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment Country: The Netherlands. Publications Arginine intake and risk of coronary heart disease mortality in elderly men C M Oomen Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 20:2134-9. 2000 Association between trans fatty acid intake and 10-year risk of coronary heart disease in the Zutphen Elderly Study: a prospective population-based study C M Oomen Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology,...
http://labome.org/expert/the/national/oomen/c-m-oomen-661030.html
*  PHE 721: Infectious Disease Epidemiology.
 PHE 721: Infectious Disease Epidemiology. Enabling javascript will improve the functionality of this page. Enabling javascript will improve the functionality of this page. Enabling javascript will improve the functionality of this page. Course Link pop-ups require javascript, but without, links simply open target page as expected. . Lehman College. Lehman College. WebMail. BlackBoard. eSims. Directory. Maps Directions. Shortcuts ------------ Academic Calendar Apply for Admission Bronx Net Building Grounds Work Order System Buy Tickets Check Grades Check Office Hours Do Research File for Financial Aid Get a Transcript Get Your Lehman ID IT Support Join the APEX Order Books Public Safety Register for Courses Register for a Continuing Ed Class Search the Undergraduate Catalog Search the Graduate Catalog Subscribe to Lehman Today Student Email Take the CPE Tuition Fees Visit the Campus. What are you looking for. About. Admissions. Academics. Campus Life. Research. Library. Undergraduate Bulletin Catalog search ...
http://lehman.cuny.edu/graduate-bulletin/5487.htm
*  .. MSc. Applied Epidemiology
msc applied epidemiology year institute core units tid research methodology tid computer applications in health research tid epidemiology tid biostatistics programme core units tph field epidemiology tph public health surveillance tph epidemiology and diagnosis of communicable and non communicable diseases tph management and leadership applied epidemiology core units tph advanced epidemiology tph economic analysis and evaluation field placement unit tph field placement...
http://jkuat.ac.ke/postgraduate-courses/msc-applied-epidemiology/
*  Designing Health Care for Populations Applied Epidemiology in Health Care Administration 1st edition
... Rent 9780787952266. Chegg.com. Chegg. Rent / Buy Books Sell books. Internships & Jobs Career Profiles Advice. Explore My List Advice Scholarships SAT Test Prep ACT Test Prep. home / textbooks / medical / health care delivery / designing health care for populations / 1st edition. Designing Health Care for Populations 1st edition. Applied Epidemiology in Health Care Administration. Note: Chegg does not guarantee supplemental material with textbooks e.g. Fos, Peter J Fos, Peter J Fos PhD, David J Fine. Jonas and Kovner's Health Care Delivery in the United States Kovner, Anthony R. Dunn and Haimann's Healthcare Management Dunn, Rose. The Healthcare Quality Book Joshi, Maulik. Details about Designing Health Care for Populations:. In clear, easy-to-understand terms, Designing Health Care for Populations reveals how the science of epidemiology--the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in a population--can be implemented to lead all health care organizations. The authors, experts in health c...
http://chegg.com/textbooks/designing-health-care-for-populations-1st-edition-9780787952266-0787952265
*  CDC EIS Conference: Global Health Presentation Schedule | CDC Online Newsroom | CDC
CDC EIS Conference: Global Health Presentation Schedule. Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content. Submit Search The CDC. Submit Search The CDC. Braden, MD CAPT USPHS. Damon, MD, PhD CAPT, USPHS. Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Enter Email Address. Connect with CDC Media Subscribe to Media RSS Feeds Subscribe to CDC Media e-mail Syndicate Media on Your Site. CDC EIS Conference: Global Health Presentation Schedule Front-line disease detectives present global health research investigation findings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC today continued its 63rd Annual Epidemic Intelligence Service EIS Conference, which focuses on key health initiatives such as global health. The CDC's EIS program is an important part of our work to prevent, detect and respond to global health threats. However, there's still a lot left to do to improve health securi...
http://cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0430-2014eis-conference.html
*  Oliver W Morgan
2010 Virus detection and duration of illness among patients with 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus infection in Texas Anil Suryaprasad Epidemic Intelligence Service, Scientific Education and Professional Development Program Office Proposed, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA Clin Infect Dis 52:S109-15. 2011 Putting surveillance data into context: the role of health care utilization surveys in understanding population burden of pneumonia in developing countries Meredith Deutscher Respiratory Diseases Branch, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA J Epidemiol Glob Health 2:73-81. 2012 Household transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 and nonpharmaceutical interventions among households of high school students in San Antonio, Texas Fleetwood Loustalot Epidemic Intelligence Service, Office of Workforce and Career Development, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity, Centers for Di...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/centers/morgan/oliver-w-morgan-1559088.html
*  Multiresistant Salmonella and Other Infections in Adopted Infants from India
... Since January 1981, multiresistant Salmonella serotypes have been isolated from 33 infants adopted by U.S. Persons in 31 states have adopted infants from this nursery, although 3 states--Minnesota, Oregon, and Washington--have received 86 49% of the 176 infants sent for adoption. Reported by N Boucneau, International Mission of Hope; J Allard, PhD, State Epidemiologist, Washington State Dept of Social and Health Svcs; J Korlath, M Osterholm, PhD, AG Dean, MD, State Epidemiologist, Minnesota State Dept of Health; P Williams, DVM, JA Googins, MD, State Epidemiologist, Oregon Dept of Human Resources; K Powell, MD, Dept of Pediatrics, Strong Memorial Hospital, R Rothenberg, MD, State Epidemiologist, New York State Dept of Health; Enteric Diseases Br, Div of Bacterial Diseases, Antimicrobial and Infection Mechanisms Br, Hospital Infection Program, Center for Infectious Diseases, Field Services Div, Epidemiology Program Office, CDC. Editorial Note Editorial Note: Outbreaks due to similarly multiresistant strai...
http://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00001106.htm
*  r not epidemiology pdf Free Document Search
... doc ppt pdf xls rtf recommend pdf pdf search for r not epidemiology page of about results advertisement principles of infectious disease epidemiology pdf principles of infectious disease epidemiology module iv statistical measures much of this module was adapted from the centers for disease control and formulas from epidemiology kept simple e pdf macintosh hd users buddygerstman dropbox eks formula sheet doc page of formulas from epidemiology kept simple e chapter epidemiologic analysis of epidemiological data using r and epicalc pdf analysis of epidemiological data using r and epicalc author virasakdi chongsuvivatwong cvirasak medicine psu ac th epidemiology unit prince of down advertisement related search more pdf analysis of epidemiological data using r and epicalc analysis of epidemiological data using r and epicalc author virasakdi chongsuvivatwong cvirasak medicine psu ac th epidemiology unit prince of cran r project org doc contrib epicalc book pdf what is clinical epidemiology jstor what is clini...
http://freedocumentsearch.com/pdf/r-not-epidemiology.html
*  Course Website Locator: id298-01
... Harvard School of Public Health The following course websites match your request: Winter 2009 Inference in Infectious Disease Epidemiology Department of Epidemiology and Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases Dr. M Lipsitch, Dr. C Mills 1.25 credits Course Offered 2008-2009; Offered Alternate Years. This course will cover advanced issues in the design and interpretation of studies of infectious disease epidemiology. The course will consist of readings and student presentations on topics such as: interpretations of molecular typing data for infectious agents, assessment of incomplete and temporary immunity, immune correlates of protection, spatial effects in disease transmission, and inference about the carrier state. This course is intended for advanced students in infectious disease epidemiology. Course note: Interested students should contact the instructor by the end of Fall 1 to choose a topic for presentation and to discuss possible readings. EPI225,EPI285, EPI501 or permission of the inst...
http://my.hsph.harvard.edu/course/hsph-id298-01
*  Probabilistic models in infectious disease epidemiology and risk analysis
... of food production chains. Common features of the methodology include data augmentation, latent variables, hidden Markov models, and extensive use of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation in Bayesian hierarchical modelling. Specific applications include development of Bayesian estimation methods for point process models of transmission of recurrent infections: spread of Haemophilus influenzae type b Hib bacteria in a family environment, transmission of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pnc within families, and studies on the time course from Pnc infection until disease, modified by immunological responses, as well as the time course of a single outbreak of meningococcal epidemics in a military garrison. Specific aims in the project include development and applications of data analysis in multilevel transmission models, studies of Pnc transmission using stochastic simulation models, and assessment of underlying Pnc disease rates in surveillance systems with non-perfect sensitivity and specificity. Eerola has recentl...
http://rni.helsinki.fi/biometry/BM_inf_dis.html
*  Epidemiology Program
... SanDiegoCounty.gov Home. Departments. Air Pollution Control District. Aging & Independence Services. Animal Services. Assessor/Recorder/County Clerk. Behavioral Health Services. Chief Administrative Office. Child Support Services. Child Welfare Services. Clerk of the Board of Supervisors. Communications Office. Community Services Group. County Counsel. District Attorney. Emergency Services. Environmental Health. Finance and General Government Group. General Services. Health & Human Services Agency. Housing and Community Development. Human Resources. Medical Examiner. Planning & Development Services. Public Administrator, Guardian, and Conservator. Public Defender. Public Health. Public Safety Group. Public Works. Strategy and Intergovernmental Affairs. Technology Office. Jobs. CalFresh Food Stamps. Medi-Cal. Rental Assistance Section 8. Public Housing. Fictitious Business Name. Child Support. Property Tax. Report. Child Abuse. Elder Abuse. Animal Abuse. Tobacco Complaints. Food Sanitation Complaints. Mar...
http://sandiegocounty.gov/hhsa/programs/phs/community_epidemiology/
*  .. Tag Archives: whooping cough .. State epidemiologist: Stop the spread of whooping cough .. Vacc
Tag Archives: whooping cough. State epidemiologist: Stop the spread of whooping cough by. Anne Brice, KCAW April 23, 2013 5:10 pm. An infant in Western Alaska died of whooping cough last month. It's the first recorded death from the disease in the state since 2002. The infant was younger than two months, the age when whooping cough vaccinations start. The bacterial infection, which is also known as pertussis is extremely contagious and the number of cases in Alaska started increasing dramatically late last year. Vaccinations to stifle rise in whooping cough by. Anne Brice, KCAW April 9, 2013 6:57 pm. Whooping cough is on the rise in Alaska. It’s been moving up the coast from California, and in March, caused the death of an infant in Anchorage. But there are ways to avoid catching the highly contagious bacterial infection....
http://kcaw.org/tag/whooping-cough/
*  Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
... The 'Journal of Clinical Epidemiology' is a peer reviewed journal of Epidemiology that promotes the quality of clinical and patient-oriented health services research through the advancement and application of innovative methods of :. Conducting and presenting primary research; Synthesizing research results; Disseminating results; and Translating results into optimal clinical practice; With special attention to the training of new generations of scientists and clinical practice leaders. http://www.jclinepi.com/content/aims. The Journal, published by Elsevier, was previously published as the 'Journal of Chronic Diseases'. The journal was first published in 1955 as a follow-up to Harry S. Truman 's 1951 Presidential Task Force on national health concerns and the subsequently written Magnuson Report. Furthermore, consistent with the epidemiological transition model, the landscape of the United States' healthcare woes transformed from primarily infectious disease mortality to mortality induced by chronic dise...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journal_of_Clinical_Epidemiology
*  Karen Kelso | The S.T.A.B.L.E. Program | ZoomInfo.com
Karen Kelso. Program. ZoomInfo.com. Careers. Recruiting. ZoomInfo Data Services. ZoomInfo Pro. ZoomInfo Community Edition. ZoomInfo API. ZoomInfo for Salesforce. Our Company. Data Sources. News and Press. Careers. Customer Support. People. See other services through which you can share this profile. Karen Kelso Wrong Karen Kelso. Assistant State Epidemiologist Office of Public Health Presbyterian Hospital. Karen Kelso RN Presbyterian Hospital Albuquerque, NM 87102 505 841-1090. State health officials don't track the numbers of West Nile virus cases that also have chronic health problems because a health condition such as diabetes isn't a risk factor for West Nile virus, said Karen Kelso, assistant state epidemiologist with the Office of Public Health in New Orleans. By Karen Kelso, RN, ... By Karen Kelso, RN, McDonough District Hospital Home Health Care. Karen Kelso, R.N., M.S.N., of the state Office of Public Health, organized the "Train the Trainer" program, in which nurses, epidemiologist, and hospital rep...
http://zoominfo.com/p/Karen-Kelso/59556737
*  Eileen L Yee
Research Topics ohio gastroenteritis california hospital emergency service rotavirus infections feces population surveillance seasons cost of illness incidence severity of illness index rescue work relief work disasters norovirus caliciviridae infections natural disasters communicable diseases texas disease outbreaks rural population diarrhea rotavirus vaccines sentinel surveillance cohort studies china. Publications Burden of rotavirus disease among children visiting pediatric emergency departments in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Oakland, California, in 1999-2000 Eileen L Yee Division of Viral Diseases, Epidemic Intelligence Service Program, Office of Workforce and Career Development, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA Pediatrics 122:971-7. 2008 Widespread outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis among evacuees of Hurricane Katrina residing in a large "megashelter" in Houston, Texas: lessons learned for prevention Eileen L ...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/centers/yee/eileen-l-yee-1392935.html
*  Amy L Freeland
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts USA. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Freeland Amy L Freeland. Research Topics transportation walking public health data collection motor activity socioeconomic factors. Amy L Freeland Summary Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Country: USA. Publications Walking associated with public transit: moving toward increased physical activity in the United States Amy L Freeland Epidemic Intelligence Service and the National Center for Environmental Health, Healthy Community Design Initiative, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA Am J Public Health 103:536-42. 2013. Detail Information Publications 1 Walking associated with public transit: moving toward increased physical activity in the United States Amy L Freeland Epidemic Intelligence Service and the National Center for Environmental Health, Healthy Community Design Initiative, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA Am J Pu...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/centers/freeland/amy-l-freeland-2212916.html
*  Sachiko Baba
Research Topics premature birth tobacco use cessation term birth pregnancy trimesters smoking causality parity prenatal exposure delayed effects smoking cessation educational status registries odds ratio body mass index. Sachiko Baba Summary Affiliation: Karolinska Institutet Country: Sweden. Publications Changes in snuff and smoking habits in Swedish pregnant women and risk for small for gestational age births S Baba Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden BJOG 120:456-62. 2013 Influence of smoking and snuff cessation on risk of preterm birth Sachiko Baba Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden Eur J Epidemiol 27:297-304. 2012 Influence of snuff and smoking habits in early pregnancy on risks for stillbirth and early neonatal mortality Sachiko Baba Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Nicotine Tob Res 16:78-83. Detail Information Publications ...
http://labome.org/expert/sweden/karolinska/baba/sachiko-baba-2069008.html
*  Sanny Chen
Publications Coccidioidomycosis: knowledge, attitudes, and practices among healthcare providers--Arizona, 2007 Sanny Chen Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA Med Mycol 49:649-56. 2011 2008 outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul infections associated with raw produce Casey Barton Behravesh National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA N Engl J Med 364:918-27. 2011 Hospitalized patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza in the United States, April-June 2009 Seema Jain Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA N Engl J Med 361:1935-44. Detail Information Publications 4 Coccidioidomycosis: knowledge, attitudes, and practices among healthcare providers--Arizona, 2007 Sanny Chen Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC, Atlanta, Georgia 30...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/centers/chen/sanny-chen-1760021.html
*  Edwin Trevathan
http://www.newswise.com/articles/baylor-president-ken-starr-announces-appointment-of-dr-edwin-trevathan-m-d-m-p-h-as-executive-vice-president-and-provost Previously he was director of the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC in Atlanta, Georgia. Before joining CDC in 2007, Trevathan was professor of neurology and pediatrics, as well as director of the Division of Pediatric & Developmental Neurology, at Washington University in St. Louis Children's Hospital. • Epidemic Intelligence Service EIS Officer, 1987–89, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC. As an Epidemic Intelligence Service IEIS officer at CDC in the late 1980s, Trevathan chaired an international committee of experts in child neurology, genetics, and developmental pediatrics who defined the diagnostic criteria for a then new neurogenetic disorder, Rett syndrome. Louis Children's Hospital, where he was a professor and directed the Pediatric Epilepsy Center, w...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Trevathan
*  Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists
... the council of state and territorial epidemiologists cste was organized in the usa in the early s in response to the need to have at least one person in each state and territory responsible for public health surveillance of disease s and conditions of public health significance since then cste has grown to include members from every u s state and territory canada and great britain the surveillance and epidemiology of infectious disease s chronic diseases and conditions and environmental health concerns are priority areas for cste members serve as special topic consultants for a broad range of public health concerns such as hiv aids and vaccine preventable diseases vision statement mission statement see also external links vision statement the council of state and territorial epidemiologists is committed to improving the public s health by supporting the efforts of epidemiologists working at the state and local level to influence public health programs and policy based on science and data mission statemen...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Council_of_State_and_Territorial_Epidemiologists
*  Managerial epidemiology
The use of epidemiological tools in health care management can be described as 'managerial epidemiology'. 2 The use epidemiological concepts and tools to improve decisions about the management of health services. 3 History Variations Application Differentiation References. Academics were encouraging use of epidemiological methods in health care management for quality improvement and planning before the term ‘managerial epidemiology’ was coined. An important distinction can be drawn between population epidemiology and clinical epidemiology. If the US health care system had fully evolved in a direction that entailed management of care for populations rather than patients, then the concepts, methods and perspectives drawn from population epidemiology would have been ideal tools for use by managers. 8 In each cycle of health reform, the utility of epidemiology in planning medical services for populations was recognized. Hospitals do not serve enrolled populations; they serve the patients who are treated in their ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Managerial_epidemiology
*  Prevalence and incidence of vertebral deformities - Springer
... Prevalence and incidence of vertebral deformities. L J Melton III. Affiliated with Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic. Affiliated with Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic. Affiliated with Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic. Affiliated with Section of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic. Changes in the method of measuring vertebral heights, changes in the source of normal values for vertebral measurements and changes in the criteria for assessing vertebral deformity had little impact on estimated prevalence and incidence in this population. The prevalence of any vertebral deformity was estimated at 25.3 per 100 Rochester women aged 50 years and over 95% CI, 22.3–28.2, while the incidence of a new deformity in this group was estimated at 17.8 per 1000 person-years 95% CI, 16.0–19.7. Keywords Epidemiology Incidence Oste...
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01623271
*  Impact of smoking and quitting on cardiovascular outcomes and risk advancement periods among older a
... dults - Springer. Search Options. Advanced Search. Search Help. Search Menu. Sign up / Log in English. Deutsch. Academic edition. Corporate edition. Skip to: Main content Side column. Home. Contact Us. Look Inside. Get Access. Find out how to access preview-only content. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE. European Journal of Epidemiology August 2013, Volume 28, Issue 8, pp 649-658 First online: 09 February 2013. Impact of smoking and quitting on cardiovascular outcomes and risk advancement periods among older adults. Carolin Gellert. Affiliated with Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center DKFZ., Ben Schöttker. Affiliated with Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center DKFZ., Heiko Müller. Affiliated with Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center DKFZ., Bernd Holleczek. Affiliated with Saarland Cancer Registry., Hermann Brenner. Affiliated with Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Rese...
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10654-013-9776-0
*  Graduate Diploma in Clinical Epidemiology - Details - Postgraduate study at the University of Newcas
The University of Newcastle Gradschool. Further information regarding English language proficiency requirements can be found at the English Language Proficiency for Admission Policy at http://www.newcastle.edu.au/about-uon/governance-and-leadership/policy-library/document?RecordNumber=D15/15438 Credit Transfer If you wish to apply for credit for studies completed at another institution, or if you are changing programs within the University and wish to transfer your credit to the new program, go to http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/credit-transfer/ and click on How to Apply for Credit. International Students Special Needs Students with a disability who require reasonable adjustments to undertake their program should contact the Disability Support Service before semester or early in the semester. Biostatistics A Semester 1 - 2016 Callaghan Semester 1 - 2016 GradSchool Semester 1 - 2015 Callaghan Semester 1 - 2015 GradSchool 10 units. Biostatistics B Semester 2 - 2016 Callaghan Semester 2 - 2016 GradSchool Sem...
http://gradschool.edu.au/programs/details/graduate-diploma-clinical-epidemiology-10965
*  Swiss TPH : This page is not available
... Swiss TPH. Kopfbild. About us. Vision and Strategy. Departments. Board of Governors. R Geigy Foundation. Support Group. Staff. Careers. How to get there. News & Events. Ebola. News. Upcoming Seminars. Conferences. Swiss TPH Symposia. Services. Swiss Centre for International Health. Medical Services and Diagnostic. Medicines Research. Data Support. eHealth. Health System Strengthening. Malaria Modelling Resource Centre. Repellent and Insecticide Testing. Research. Epidemiology and Public Health. Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology. Publications. Teaching. Undergraduate / Bachelor. Graduate / Masters. Doctorate. Professional Postgraduate. MD Specialization in Public Health. Resources. Library. Publications. Projects. Multimedia. PhD/MD Gallery. Literature Databases LUDOK and ELMAR. Software. Epidemiological Databases. Home. Impressum. Sitemap. Contact. Print. . E D. F. This page is not available. The page you've requested has been moved or taken off the site. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please...
http://swisstph.ch/speziell/notfound.html?redirect_url=/no_cache/about-us/staff/detail-single-all/staff/1498/richard-faustine-sambaiga.html
*  Swiss TPH : This page is not available
... Swiss TPH. Kopfbild. About us. Vision and Strategy. Departments. Board of Governors. R Geigy Foundation. Support Group. Staff. Careers. How to get there. News & Events. Ebola. News. Upcoming Seminars. Conferences. Swiss TPH Symposia. Services. Swiss Centre for International Health. Medical Services and Diagnostic. Medicines Research. Data Support. eHealth. Health System Strengthening. Malaria Modelling Resource Centre. Repellent and Insecticide Testing. Research. Epidemiology and Public Health. Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology. Publications. Teaching. Undergraduate / Bachelor. Graduate / Masters. Doctorate. Professional Postgraduate. MD Specialization in Public Health. Resources. Library. Publications. Projects. Multimedia. PhD/MD Gallery. Literature Databases LUDOK and ELMAR. Software. Epidemiological Databases. Home. Impressum. Sitemap. Contact. Print. . E D. F. This page is not available. The page you've requested has been moved or taken off the site. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please...
http://swisstph.ch/speziell/notfound.html?redirect_url=/no_cache/about-us/staff/detail-single-all/staff/454/christiane-braghiroli.html
*  Swiss TPH : This page is not available
... Swiss TPH. Kopfbild. About us. Vision and Strategy. Departments. Board of Governors. R Geigy Foundation. Support Group. Staff. Careers. How to get there. News & Events. Ebola. News. Upcoming Seminars. Conferences. Swiss TPH Symposia. Services. Swiss Centre for International Health. Medical Services and Diagnostic. Medicines Research. Data Support. eHealth. Health System Strengthening. Malaria Modelling Resource Centre. Repellent and Insecticide Testing. Research. Epidemiology and Public Health. Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology. Publications. Teaching. Undergraduate / Bachelor. Graduate / Masters. Doctorate. Professional Postgraduate. MD Specialization in Public Health. Resources. Library. Publications. Projects. Multimedia. PhD/MD Gallery. Literature Databases LUDOK and ELMAR. Software. Epidemiological Databases. Home. Impressum. Sitemap. Contact. Print. . E D. F. This page is not available. The page you've requested has been moved or taken off the site. We apologize for the inconvenience. Please...
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*  Michael Osterholm
... 'Michael T., is a prominent public health scientist and a nationally recognized biosecurity expert in the United States. 1 Osterholm is the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy CIDRAP at the University of Minnesota, a professor in the School of Public Health, and an adjunct professor in the University of Minnesota Medical School. 2 Career Biosecurity Other Honors References External links. From 1975 to 1999, Osterholm served in various roles at the Minnesota Department of Health MDH, including as state epidemiologist and Chief of the Acute Disease Epidemiology Section from 1984 to 1999. While at the MDH, Osterholm strengthened the departments role in infectious disease epidemiology, notably including numerous foodborne disease outbreaks, the association between tampon s and toxic shock syndrome TSS, and the transmission of hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus HIV in healthcare workers. Other work included studies regarding the epidemiology of infectious diseases in ch...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Osterholm
*  Nutritional epidemiology
... is a relatively new field of medical research that studies the relationship between nutrition and health diet and physical activity are difficult to measure accurately which may partly explain why nutrition has received less attention than other risk factors for disease in epidemiology references category epidemiology category medical research category nutrition category public health...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutritional_epidemiology
*  Related Websites | Epiconcept
related websites epiconcept skip to navigation related websites epiconcept site map join us downloads english français search syndicate more epidemiology and it systems for public health epiconcept it systems epidemiology training ngo references home related websites related websites epiconcept related websites wepi voozanoo epiconcept ngo wiki i move project quick search area information systems epidemiology training and health issues data analysis screening medical records data exchange and interoperability inquiries and questionnaires clinical study epidemic investigations laboratory required declaration diseases occupational medicine mhealth ngo tools information feedback epidemiological study design health information security case and contact follow up epidemiological surveillance early warning system health information systems vaccine other and diseases arboviral diseases cancer dengue diarr...
http://epiconcept.fr/en/story/related-websites
*  Swiss TPH : Research
... Swiss TPH Kopfbild. About us. Vision and Strategy. Departments. Board of Governors. R Geigy Foundation. Support Group. Staff. Careers. News & Events. Ebola. News. Upcoming Seminars. Conferences. Swiss TPH Symposia. Services. Swiss Centre for International Health. Medical Services and Diagnostic. Medicines Research. Data Support. eHealth. Health System Strengthening. Malaria Modelling Resource Centre. Repellent and Insecticide Testing. Research. Epidemiology and Public Health. Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology. Publications. Teaching. Undergraduate / Bachelor. Graduate / Masters. Doctorate. Professional Postgraduate. MD Specialization in Public Health. Resources. Library. Publications. Projects. Multimedia. PhD/MD Gallery. Literature Databases LUDOK and ELMAR. Software. Epidemiological Databases. Home. E. D. F. Epidemiology and Public Health. Medical Parasitology & Infection Biology. Publications. Links Publications. Projects. Research at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute Swiss TPH emp...
http://swisstph.ch/research.html
*  .. Search News Summaries For: .. Global Health 'Blunders' Can Lend Useful Lessons .. recent report
Facebook Twitter Email. Print. Home Global Health Policy Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report September 27, 2011. Global Health 'Blunders' Can Lend Useful Lessons. Sep 27, 2011. New York Times reporter Lawrence Altman recounts his experience in the mid-1960s with a measles immunization campaign in Upper Volta now Burkina Faso during his time with the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the CDC in a “ Doctor’s World ” perspective piece in the newspaper. Altman says that although the effort to expand the immunization campaign from a small field trial to a regional program “failed miserably,” the “lessons learned from these blunders led to a new program that wiped out smallpox, still the only human disease to have been eradicated from the planet.”. “In the 1960s, international aid programs were far less common than they are today,” Altman writes, adding, “Now, medical professionals are devoting careers to global health, and students commonly volunteer for overseas programs, sometimes for academic credit. Yet de...
http://kff.org/news-summary/global-health-blunders-can-lend-useful-lessons/
*  .. Invitation to the 2013 Central research Forum – Oct. 24 .. Share this:
new grants support medical student research cdc offers year out applied epidemiology fellowship invitation to the central research forum â oct posted on october by mark willis please join us thursday oct when the office of research affairs presents the central research forum in the wsu student union crf program highlights include p m room e building a translationalâ research collaboration in orthopaedic surgery this keynote session features talks by richard laughlin m d department of orthopaedic surgery sports medicine rehabilitation and dana duren ph d department of community health p m room e data blitz fifteen presenters will get minutes each to tell the audience why they should take a closer look at the presenter s research during the poster session p m apollo room poster session andâ reception we have more than posters showcasing the range of biomedical clinical medical education and public health research at wsu join your colleagues in a convivial stimulating setting to explore new ideas and future coll...
http://researchenterprise.net/2013/10/17/invitation-to-the-2013-central-research-forum-oct-24/
*  CDC Newsroom Press Release June 8, 2009
... Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Your Online Source for Credible Health Information Search The CDC. CDC Newsroom. Formatted Articles. Press Release Archive. Press Release. For Immediate Release: June 8 2009 Contact: CDC s Division of Media Relations 404 639-3286. Frieden, MD, MPH, begins role as CDC Director and ATSDR Administrator Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., today became the 16th director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC and administrator for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry ATSDR . He was named director of CDC by the White House and the Department of Health and Human Services on May 15. Dr. Frieden, 48, has been the director of the New York City NYC Health Department since 2002. He is an infectious disease expert and has lead initiatives that support wellness and prevention. He replaces Dr. Friede...
http://cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2009/r090608.htm?s_cid=mediarel_r090608
*  Selim Kilic (Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara) on ResearchGate
Selim Kilic Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara on ResearchGate. For full functionality of ResearchGate it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are the instructions how to enable JavaScript in your web browser. Selim Kilic. Gulhane Military Medical Acade..., Ankara. Doctor of Medicine. 39.95. Connect. Overview. Contributions. Info. Stats. Selim Kilic has. 198. Publications. 4k. Reads. 1,859. Citations. 357.12. Impact Points. View stats. Featured publications. View all. Article:. Predictors of No-Reflow Phenomenon in Young Patients With Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. Turgay Celik. Sevket Balta. Cengiz Ozturk. Mehmet Gungor Kaya. Mustafa Aparci. Osman A Yildirim. Mustafa Demir. Murat Unlu. Sait Demirkol. Selim Kilic. Atila Iyisoy. 10. Reads. 0 Citations. Article:. Pupillometric findings in children with obstructive sleep apnea. Mona Philby. Secil Aydinoz. David Gozal. Selim Kilic. Rakesh Bhattacharjee. Hari P. Bandla. Leila Kheiran...
http://researchgate.net/profile/Selim_Kilic
*  .. Virtually Speaking Science April 24
Virtually Speaking Science April 24. Posted on. April 20, 2013 by. Paul Doherty. Virtually Speaking. Live Wednesday April 24, 2013 2pm PST – Tom Levenson – filmmaker and Prof of Science Writing at MIT – hosts Maryn McKenna. The topic is looming antibiotic disaster. Journalist and author Maryn McKenna specializes in public health, global health and food policy. “Scary Disease Girl’ is the author of Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA and Beating Back the Devil: On the Front Lines with the Disease Detectives of the epidemic intelligence service. https://virtually-speaking.squarespace.com/virtually-speaking-science. Located in the. Exploratorium sim in Second Life. Click for SLURL. This entry was posted in 3D Virtual World, Event, Second Life and tagged Discussion, Science. Bookmark the permalink....
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fabricated-realities/virtually-speaking-science-april-24/
*  Alessandro Menotti
2012 Cardiovascular risk factors predict survival in middle-aged men during 50 years Alessandro Menotti Association for Cardiac Research Associazione per la Ricerca Cardiologica, Rome, Italy Eur J Intern Med 24:67-74. 2012 Forty-year mortality from cardiovascular diseases and all causes of death in the US Railroad cohort of the Seven Countries Study Alessandro Menotti National Institute of Public Health and Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands Eur J Epidemiol 19:417-24. 2008 Forty-year coronary mortality trends and changes in major risk factors in the first 10 years of follow-up in the seven countries study Alessandro Menotti Association for Cardiac Research Associazione per Ricerca Cardiologica, Via Latina 49, Rome 00179, Italy Eur J Epidemiol 22:747-54. Cardiovascular risk factors predict survival in middle-aged men during 50 years Alessandro Menotti Association for Cardiac Research Associazione per la Ricerca Cardiologica, Rome, Italy Eur J Intern Med 24:67-74. Forty-year mortality from cardiovascular d...
http://labome.org/expert/italy/menotti/alessandro-menotti-299644.html
*  Match details for Epidemiologists
... epidemiologists matches for pre veterinary medicine alternate occupation titles match o net soc description match tasks matches detailed work activities match alternate occupation titles veterinary epidemiologist o net soc description investigate and describe the determinants and distribution of disease disability or health outcomes may develop the means for prevention and control tasks prepare and analyze samples to study effects of drugs gases pesticides or microorganisms on cell structure and tissue conduct research to develop methodologies instrumentation and procedures for medical application analyzing data and presenting findings educate healthcare workers patients and the public about infectious and communicable diseases including disease transmission and prevention plan and direct studies to investigate human or animal disease preventive methods and treatments for disease standardize drug dosages methods of immunization and procedures for manufacture of drugs and medicinal compounds teach princip...
http://onetonline.org/find/score/19-1041.00?s=Pre-Veterinary Medicine
*  .. antimicrobial .. Antibiotic resistance called ‘urgent public health issue’
antimicrobial recent articles antibiotic resistance called â urgent public health issueâ by msr online september state health officials have joined their counterparts at the centers for disease control and prevention cdc in calling attention to the threat of antibiotic resistance as a critical public health and patient care and safety issue cdc released its report today that describes antimicrobial resistance accounting for two million infections and deaths each year in the united states in addition illness caused by the bacteria clostridium difficile which is associated with antibiotic use accounts for hospitalizations and deaths nationally cdc estimates that up to percent of all the antibiotics prescribed for people are not needed or are not prescribed appropriately minnesota has long been in the forefront of identifying and addressing antibiotic resistance threats said minnesota state epidemiologist dr ruth lynfield continue reading filed under health fm kmoj african american news african american newspape...
http://spokesman-recorder.com/tag/antimicrobial/
*  Rigsrevisionen
... thumb right px rigsrevisionen is the national audit agency of denmark and an independent institution of the folketinget it is responsible for auditing the expenditure of danish central government and also public sector bodies in which the government has an economic interest such as hospital s and the danish security and intelligence service in july rigsrevision made serious criticisms of the royal danish navy s finances auditing is not limited to narrow financial terms such as investigating the stability of the banking system it also checks that public services provide value for taxpayers money in a more general sense for instance in rigsrevisionen launched an investigation into the ability of water suppliers and the environment ministry to protect consumers from traces of herbicides in drinking water rigsrevisionen was part of the economy ministry from to references category government of denmark category government audit...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigsrevisionen
*  Mathematical modelling in epidemiology
... redirect mathematical modelling of infectious disease...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_modelling_in_epidemiology
*  Modelling in Epidemiology
... redirect mathematical modelling of infectious disease...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modelling_in_Epidemiology
*  Genotyping of Campylobacter spp. from retail meats by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotypin
... g - Ge - 2005 - Journal of Applied Microbiology - Wiley Online Library. Journal of Applied Microbiology. JOURNAL MENU Journal Home FIND ISSUES Current Issue. Virtual Issues FIND ARTICLES Early View. Virtual Issue on Campylobacter. Virtual Issue on Food Safety. You have free access to this content Genotyping of Campylobacter spp. from retail meats by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping. Meng 1 Article first published online: 31 OCT 2005 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2005.02750.x. Journal of Applied Microbiology Volume 100, Issue 1, pages 175 184, January 2006. Additional Information How to Cite Ge, B., Girard, W., Zhao, S., Friedman, S., Gaines, S.A. 2006, Genotyping of Campylobacter spp. from retail meats by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ribotyping. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 100: 175 184. Author Information 1 Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 2 Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 3 Division of Animal ...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2005.02750.x/abstract
*  Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and flagellin gene typing in identifying clonal groups of C
... ampylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in farm and clinical environments - Sheffield Hallam University Research Archive. Login. SHURA home. Statistics. About SHURA. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and flagellin gene typing in identifying clonal groups of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in farm and clinical environments. Tools. Tools. Tools. RDF+XML BibTeX RDF+N-Triples JSON RefWorks Dublin Core Simple Metadata Refer METS HTML Citation ASCII Citation OpenURL ContextObject EndNote MODS OpenURL ContextObject in Span MPEG-21 DIDL EP3 XML Reference Manager RDF+N3 Multiline CSV. Use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and flagellin gene typing in identifying clonal groups of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in farm and clinical environments. Link to published version:: 10.1128/AEM.67.4.1429-1436.2001. Although campylobacters have been isolated from a wide range of animal hosts, the association between campylobacters isolated from humans and animals in the farm environment is u...
http://shura.shu.ac.uk/399/
*  Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis
... 'Pulsed field gel electrophoresis' is a technique used for the separation of large deoxyribonucleic acid DNA molecule s by applying to a gel matrix an electric field that periodically changes direction. Historical background Procedure Theory Applications External links References. Standard gel electrophoresis techniques for separation of DNA molecules provided huge advantages for molecular biology research. DNA molecules larger than 15-20 kb migrating through a gel will essentially move together in a size-independent manner. 1 This technique became known as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis PFGE. coli cluster analysis-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.jpg The procedure for this technique is relatively similar to performing a standard gel electrophoresis except that instead of constantly running the voltage in one direction, the voltage is periodically switched among three directions; one that runs through the central axis of the gel and two that run at an angle of 60 degrees either side. For extremely larg...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulsed-field_gel_electrophoresis
*  Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis as an Epidemiologic Tool fo... : Sexually Transmitted Diseases
... . Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Subscribe. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Issues Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Home Currently selected. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Journal Info. About the Journal. About ASTDA. Editorial Board. Advertising. Open Access. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Home. January 2002 - Volume 29 - Issue 1. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis as an Epidemiologic Tool fo... Previous Article. Next Article. Text sizi...
http://journals.lww.com/stdjournal/Fulltext/2002/01000/Pulsed_Field_Gel_Electrophoresis_as_an.5.aspx
*  human chromosome 14/pulse field electrophoresis
human chromosome pulse field electrophoresis human chromosome pulse field electrophoresis david weaver dweaver at bgnet bgsu edu tue sep est previous message make your own vacuum pump for gel blotting web page next message biomx electronic journal messages sorted by i presently am looking into the use of pulse field gel electrophoresis methodology to assess breaks points in our generated human tumor cell lines and need help in locating databases for restriction enzyme maps noti etc of human chromosome any and all suggestions would be appreciated previous message make your own vacuum pump for gel blotting web page next message biomx electronic journal messages sorted by more information about the gen link mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/gen-link/1996-September/001101.html
*  Mega-telomere
Telomeric regions of DNA were first identified in the late 1970s See: Discovery of Telomeric DNA. In 1994, extremely long telomeric regions were identified in chickens. 6 Telomeric sequences ranging from 20 kilobases to several megabases have also been identified in several species of birds. Telomeres are identified by telomere arrays. Analysis of siblings from highly inbred chicken-lines have suggested that these ultra-long telomeric sequences are extremely heterogenous. 9 In birds, whose cells contain microchromosomes, it has been suggested that there was a correlation between the presence of mega-telomeres and the number of microchromosomes present in a species, such that bird genomes with large numbers of microchromosomes also possessed larger amounts of telomeric DNA sequence. However, subsequent studies showed that mega-telomeres are not necessarily present in all species with microchromosomes, nor are they found on all microchromosomes within a cell. Mega-telomeres have been best described in vertebrat...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mega-telomere
*  Pulsenet
... 'PulseNet' is a network run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC which brings together public health and food regulatory agency laboratories around the United States. http://www.cdc.gov/pulsenet/ CDC PulseNet USA Website Through the network, cooperating groups can share pulsed field gel electrophoresis PFGE results which act as fingerprints to distinguish strains of organisms such as ' E. coli ' O157:H7 and non O157, Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria, Campylobacter, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Yersinia pestis. In this way, efforts to combat infectious disease outbreak s are strengthened. Due to the success of 'Pulsenet' USA since its inception in 1996, similar networks have been established internationally in Canada 2000, the Asia Pacific 2002, Europe 2003, http://www.pulsenet-europe.org/ PulseNet Europe Website Latin America 2003, http://www.panalimentos.org/pulsenet/ PulseNet Latin America Website and the Middle East 2006. These networks collaborate under the umbrella of ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulsenet
*  Scientific Publications by FDA Staff
... Quick Links: Skip to main page content Skip to Search Skip to Topics Menu Skip to Common Links. Food. Medical Devices. Animal Veterinary. Tobacco Products. Scientific Publications by FDA Staff. FDA Home. Scientific Publications Detail Entry. - Search Publications. Abstract Centers. All Centers Animal and Veterinary Biologics Drugs Food Medical Devices Office of the Commissioner Regulatory Affairs Tobacco Toxicological Research. Entry Details PLoS One 2013;8 1 :e55254 On the Evolutionary History, Population Genetics and Diversity among Isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis PFGE Pattern JEGX01.0004. Facile laboratory tools are needed to augment identification in contamination events to trace the contamination back to the source traceback of Salmonella enterica subsp. Enteriditis isolates within S. Enteriditis Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis PFGE pattern JEGX01.0004 and close relatives, and determined their genome sequences. Sources for these isolates spanned food, clinical and environmental farm sources coll...
http://accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/publications/search_result_record.cfm?id=44762
*  PFGE
... redirect pulsed field gel electrophoresis...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PFGE
*  CH391L/S12/CH391L/S12/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction - OpenWetWare
... CH391L/S12/CH391L/S12/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction From OpenWetWare CH391L/S12 Revision as of 15:45, 13 February 2012 by Jared Ellefson Talk. 1 What is Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction. 1.1 Pipeline for Generating Ancestral Genes 1.1.1 Methods of Inferring Ancient Sequences 1.1.2 Gene Synthesis 1.1.3 Testing Ancestral Variants. 1.2 Examples of Ancestral Sequence Reconstructions 1.2.1 Evolution of Coral Pigments 1.2.2 Inferring the Paleoenvironment of ancient Earth. What is Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction. Sequence information Nucleic Acid and Protein from extant species can be used to infer the sequences of common ancestor species which can be synthesized and tested in the lab. Sequence Reconstruction Example. Sequences from extant species of the desired common ancestral gene and outgroup genes are aligned. The ancestral gene is inferred based on evolutionary models typically maximum parsimony or maximum likelihood. Ancestral genes are cloned and tested for function. Methods of Inferring Ancient ...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=CH391L/S12/CH391L/S12/Ancestral_Sequence_Reconstruction&oldid=583945
*  CH391L/S13/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction - OpenWetWare
... Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction refers to the construction of hypothesized protein or DNA sequences belonging to a common ancestor of extant proteins or DNA. Sequence information Nucleic Acid and Protein from extant species can be used to infer the sequences of common ancestor species which can be synthesized and tested in the lab. The method was originally discussed by Pauling and Zuckerkandl in 1963 cite Pauling /cite, almost 30 years before the theory was experimentally tested. Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction refers to the construction of hypothesized protein or DNA sequences belonging to a common ancestor of extant proteins or DNA. Sequence information Nucleic Acid and Protein from extant species can be used to infer the sequences of common ancestor species which can be synthesized and tested in the lab. The method was originally discussed by Pauling and Zuckerkandl in 1963 cite Pauling /cite, almost 30 years before the theory was experimentally tested. ==Pipeline for Generating Ancestral Genes==...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=CH391L/S13/Ancestral_Sequence_Reconstruction&diff=677463&oldid=677462
*  CH391L/S13/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction - OpenWetWare
... CH391L/S13/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction From OpenWetWare Difference between revisions Jump to: navigation, search Revision as of 19:53, 24 February 2013 view source Aurko Dasgupta Talk. contribs → Evolution of Coral Pigments ← Previous diff. Revision as of 19:55, 24 February 2013 view source Aurko Dasgupta Talk. contribs → Evolution of Coral Pigments Next diff →. Line 30:. Line 30:. One example of ancestral sequence reconstruction was done by the Matz group currently residing at the University of Texas at Austin. Fluorescent proteins from related coral species had wavelengths corresponding to Cyan, Green, and Red cite #Ugalde /cite. The details of the evolution of fluorescent color in the GFP superfamily was not fully understand. That is, what fluorescent spectra did the common ancestors of the modern corals have. One example of ancestral sequence reconstruction was done by the Matz group currently residing at the University of Texas at Austin. Fluorescent proteins from related coral species had wav...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=CH391L/S13/Ancestral_Sequence_Reconstruction&diff=678933&oldid=678932
*  Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001)
branching order of bacterial phyla gupta branching order of bacterial phyla gupta bacterial phyla there are several models of the branching order of bacterial phyla one of these was proposed in by gupta based on conserved indels or protein termed protein signatures an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels however they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla one feature of the cladogram obtained with this method is the clustering of cell wall morphology with some exceptions from monoderms to transitional diderms to traditional diderms in the cladogram below yellow pseudopeptidoglycan monoderms gram variable red thick peptidoglycan monoderms gram positive blue thin peptidoglycan diderms gram negative green atypical see note in parethesis cladex style width auto bar gold archaea cladex bar crimson firmicutes cladex bar crimson actinobacteria see also branching order of bacterial phyla woese branching order ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branching_order_of_bacterial_phyla_(Gupta,_2001)
*  CH391L/S13/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction - OpenWetWare
Fluorescent proteins from related coral species had wavelengths corresponding to Cyan, Green, and Red. That is, what fluorescent spectra did the common ancestors of the modern corals have. Sequences for the common ancestor nodes were synthesized and tested for their activity. The common ancestor to all the superfamily had a green emission peak. The more recent common ancestor of Green/Red had two emission peaks; a strong green peak and a smaller red peak. Fluorescent proteins from related coral species had wavelengths corresponding to Cyan, Green, and Red. That is, what fluorescent spectra did the common ancestors of the modern corals have. Sequences for the common ancestor nodes were synthesized and tested for their activity. The common ancestor to all the superfamily had a green emission peak. The more recent common ancestor of Green/Red had two emission peaks; a strong green peak and a smaller red peak. 1.2 Examples of Ancestral Sequence Reconstructions 1.2.1 Evolution of Coral Pigments 1.2.2 Inferring the...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=CH391L/S13/Ancestral_Sequence_Reconstruction&diff=678913&oldid=678912
*  The FASTML Server - Server for computing Maximum Likelihood ancestral sequence reconstruction
the fastml server server for computing maximum likelihood ancestral sequence reconstruction home overview gallery source code citing credits old version the fastml server server for computing maximum likelihood ancestral sequence reconstruction type your multiple sequence alignment msa fasta format only or upload your multiple sequence alignment msa file sequences type amino acids nucleotides codons type your phylogenetic tree optional newick format only or upload phylogenetic tree file newick format only model of substitution jtt default lg mtrev for mitochondrial proteins cprev for chloroplasts proteins wag dayhoff jc model jukes and cantor t model tamura hky model hasegawa kishino and yano gtr generalised time reversible yang for codon sequences empiricodon for codon sequences please enter your email address optional your email address will be used to update you the moment the results are ready load an example advanced options phylogenetic tree method maximum likelihood ml neighbor joining optimize branch ...
http://fastml.tau.ac.il/
*  Comparison of Protein Sequences: BLAST searching and Phylogenetic Tree Construction
... Inquiry-based Integrated Instructional Units Comparison of Protein Sequences: BLAST searching and Phylogenetic Tree Construction. It accompanies several weeks of wet lab work in which students clone cDNAs encoding Cytochrome P450 1A CYP1A from animals primarily fish collected locally and exposed to pollution compounds that induce expression of the enzyme. In this exercise, students perform BLAST searches of reported CYP1A sequences and construct phylogenetic trees using CYP1A amino acid sequences from various vertebrate species, especially those with multiple CYP1A paralogs. Thus, evolutionary analysis of CYP1A sequences from many species provides an opportunity to explore the number and timing of gene duplications during vertebrate evolution. Three short readings about gene duplication in evolution and phylogenetic analysis are provided at least one week prior to class. These readings complement earlier readings that specifically concern the cloning and evolutionary analysis of CYP1A genes in fish. Mate...
http://serc.carleton.edu/genomics/units/19100.html
*  Talk:CH391L/S13/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction - OpenWetWare
... Talk:CH391L/S13/Ancestral Sequence Reconstruction. From OpenWetWare. Talk:CH391L/S13 Revision as of 00:02, 24 February 2013 by Aurko Dasgupta Talk. contribs. diff ←Older revision. Current revision diff. Newer revision→ diff. Jump to: navigation, search. Gabriel Wu 16:59, 18 February 2013 EST : Remove the cost and methods of gene synthesis or just reference the dna assembly section we've already gone over. Expand the codon optimization section unless this fits better in somewhere else. Gabriel Wu 16:59, 18 February 2013 EST : How does Pauling's proposal for ancestral gene construction relate to the actual discovery of DNA structure. Benjamin Gilman 13:21, 21 February 2013 EST : The Pauling and Zuckerkandl paper came out when the only protein sequence information we had came from limited peptide sequencing methods like Edman degradation N-terminal sequencing. You might add something about the shift to using DNA or RNA sequences to infer protein sequence once techniques like Maxam-Gilbert and Sanger sequenc...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=Talk:CH391L/S13/Ancestral_Sequence_Reconstruction&direction=prev&oldid=678776
*  Ancestral reconstruction
'Ancestral Reconstruction' also known as 'Character Mapping' or 'Character Optimization' is a method in evolutionary biology by which one can attempt to understand the phenotypic and genetic states of organisms that lived millions of years ago. Maximum Parsimony. Maximum likelihood. They are: maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and the Bayesian Inference. Maximum parsimony is the method that came about first. Maximum likelihood accounts for what we know about the likelihood of various events, which is that they are not all equal. Maximum Parsimony. Maximum Parsimony. Maximum likelihood. The main difference between this and maximum parsimony is that the maximum likelihood test accounts for the fact that not all events are equally likely to happen. When this is the case, maximum parsimony may actually be more accurate because it is more willing to make large, unlikely leaps than maximum likelihood is. Maximum likelihood has been shown to be quite reliable in reconstructing character states however it does no...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancestral_reconstruction
*  Viral phylodynamics
... Due to the impact that transmission dynamics and selection can have on viral genetic variation, viral phylogenies can therefore be used to investigate important epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes, such as epidemic spread,. Methods Coalescent theory and phylodynamics. Examples Phylodynamics of Influenza. Phylodynamics of HIV. The clustering of taxa on a viral phylogeny will be affected by host population structure see figure 2 Viruses within similar hosts, such as hosts that reside in the same geographic region, are expected to be more closely related genetically if transmission occurs more commonly between them. For example, an application to HIV sequences within infected hosts showed that viral substitution rates dropped to effectively zero following the initiation of antiretroviral drug therapy. If the population size N t changes over time, the coalescent rate \lambda n t will also be a function of time. derived this rate for a time-varying population size under the assumption o...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viral_phylodynamics
*  Diagnostic characters from Consortium of mx users. - Encyclopedia of Life
... Diagnostic characters. 2011, by Lewis L. Deitz and Matthew S. Wallace. Add to a collection. Diagnostic characters. Distance from eye to base of forewing usually greater than half eye width exceptions: Deiroderes and many Nicomiinae. Pronotum usually produced posteriorly over scutellum exceptions: Endoiastinae, Nicomiinae, Deiroderes, Abelus, and Hemicentrus, often also with anterior, lateral, or dorsal projections. Forewings with vein M fused with Cu basally share common stem; exceptions: some Nicomia and some Smiliinae. Prothoracic trochanter and femur not fused. Male abdominal segment IX usually with lateral plates discrete from pygofer exceptions: fused to pygofer in few members of various tribes; lateral plates absent in Anchistrotus and some Stegaspidini. Female pygofer not strongly produced posteroventrally. Nymph with abdominal tergum IX forming sheath around segment X, anal opening dorsal or posterior. Latest updates. No one has provided updates yet. Learn how to contribute. Add a new comment. Yo...
http://eol.org/data_objects/12685167
*  Browse By Person: Phillips, Matthew | QUT ePrints
Browse By Person: Phillips, Matthew. Browse By Person: Phillips, Matthew Statistics dashboard. Review. Book Chapter Phillips, Matthew J. Penny, David 2010 Mammalian phylogeny., Phillips, Matthew J. PLoS ONE, 10 5, e0125723., Carrano, Matthew T. Systematic Biology. Phillips, Matthew J., Gibb, Gillian C. 2014 Molecular phylogeny, biogeography, and habitat preference evolution of marsupials. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 31 9, pp., Phillips, Matthew J. Phillips, Matthew J., Gibb, Gillian,. Bunce, Michael 2013 Inferring kangaroo phylogeny from incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genes. PLoS ONE, 8 2, pp. Phillips, Matthew J. Current Biology, 23 14, R603-R605., Phillips, Matthew J. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 59 3, pp., Phillips, Matthew J. 2010 Evolutionary relationships and divergence times among the native rats of Australia. 2009 The evolutionary history of the extinct ratite moa and New Zealand Neogene paleogeography. 2009 Accounting for calibration uncertainty in phylogenetic estimation of evo...
http://eprints.qut.edu.au/view/person/Phillips,_Matthew.html

ESCAIDEPulsenet: PulseNet is a network run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which brings together public health and food regulatory agency laboratories around the United States.http://www.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Amplified fragment length polymorphismCameroon–China relations: China and Cameroon established bilateral relations on March 26, 1971. Cameroon is an adherent to the One China Policy.Genetic variation: right|thumbThermal cyclerInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology is a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the University of Chicago Press. It publishes research on control and evaluation of the transmission of pathogens in healthcare institutions and on the use of epidemiological principles and methods to evaluate and improve the delivery of care, including infection control practices, surveillance, cost-benefit analyses, resource use, occupational health, and regulatory issues.Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis: Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis (MLVA ) is a method employed for the genetic analysis of particular microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria, that takes advantage of the polymorphism of tandemly repeated DNA sequences. A "VNTR" is a "variable-number tandem repeat".Coles PhillipsBeta-lactamaseIncidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.BacitracinViral gastroenteritis: Viral gastroenteritis (Gastro-Enter-eye,tiss),http://www.merriam-webster.RAPD: RAPD (pronounced "rapid") stands for 'Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA'. It is a type of PCR reaction, but the segments of DNA that are amplified are random.Resistome: The resistome is a proposed expression by Gerard D. Wright for the collection of all the antibiotic resistance genes and their precursors in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.Klebsiella pneumoniaMycobacterium tuberculosis complex: Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex refers to a genetically related group of Mycobacterium species that can cause tuberculosis in humans or other organisms.Layout of the Port of Tianjin: The Port of Tianjin is divided into nine areas: the three core (“Tianjin Xingang”) areas of Beijiang, Nanjiang, and Dongjiang around the Xingang fairway; the Haihe area along the river; the Beitang port area around the Beitangkou estuary; the Dagukou port area in the estuary of the Haihe River; and three areas under construction (Hanggu, Gaoshaling, Nangang).National Taiwan University Hospital: The National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH; ) started operations under Japanese rule in Daitōtei (today's Dadaocheng) on June 18, 1895, and moved to its present location in 1898. The Hospital was later annexed to the Medical School of Taihoku Imperial University and renamed Taihoku Imperial University Medical School Affiliated Hospital in 1937.Triangle of death (Italy): The triangle of death (Italian: Triangolo della morte) is an area in the Italian province of Campania comprising the municipalities of Acerra, Nola and Marigliano. The region has recently experienced increasing deaths caused by cancer and other diseases that exceeds the Italian national average.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Gijs Kuenen: Johannes Gijsbrecht Kuenen (born 9 December 1940, Heemstede) is a Dutch microbiologist who is professor emeritus at the Delft University of Technology and a visiting scientist at the University of Southern California. His research is influenced by, and a contribution to, the scientific tradition of the Delft School of Microbiology.Tuberculosis managementFour Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Norovirus: Norovirus, sometimes known as the winter vomiting bug in the UK, is the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans. It affects people of all ages.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,List of lighthouses in Spain: This is a list of lighthouses in Spain.Phylogeography: Phylogeography is the study of the historical processes that may be responsible for the contemporary geographic distributions of individuals. This is accomplished by considering the geographic distribution of individuals in light of the patterns associated with a gene genealogy.Budic II of Brittany: Budic II (; or ; ), formerly known as Budick, was a king of Cornouaille in Brittany in the late 5th and early 6th centuries. He was the father of Hoel Mawr and is probably to be identified with the Emyr Llydaw ("Emperor of Brittany") and King Nentres who appear in Arthurian legend.Epidemiological method: The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates and John Snow. The techniques for gathering and analyzing epidemiological data vary depending on the type of disease being monitored but each study will have overarching similarities.Marcos Paz, Buenos AiresUniversity of CampinasSapovirus: Sapovirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Caliciviridae. Humans and swine serve as natural hosts.Molecular evolution: Molecular evolution is a change in the sequence composition of cellular molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins across generations. The field of molecular evolution uses principles of evolutionary biology and population genetics to explain patterns in these changes.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Quellung reaction: The Quellung reaction is a biochemical reaction in which antibodies bind to the bacterial capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Page 340 Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. The antibody reaction allows these species to be visualized under a microscope.Bacillary dysenteryProportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.El Queremal, Valle del CaucaColt Crag Reservoir: Colt Crag Reservoir is a relatively shallow reservoir in Northumberland, England adjacent to the A68 road, and north of Corbridge. The A68 road at this point runs along the course of Dere Street, a Roman road.Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center: Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (commonly referred to as Ichilov Hospital) is the main hospital serving Tel Aviv, Israel, and its metropolitan area. It is the third-largest hospital complex in the country.Rabies virus: The rabies virus is a neurotropic virus that causes rabies in humans and animals. Rabies transmission can occur through the saliva of animals and less commonly through contact with human saliva.Ewingella americana: Ewingella americana is a Gram-negative rod, and the only species in the genus Ewingella. It was first identified and characterized in 1983.Acinetobacter baumannii: Acinetobacter baumannii is a typically short, almost round, rod-shaped (coccobacillus) Gram-negative bacterium. It can be an opportunistic pathogen in humans, affecting people with compromised immune systems, and is becoming increasingly important as a hospital-derived (nosocomial) infection.Gene polymorphismBacteremia: (NOS) |Ferric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.List of butterflies of Tunisia: This is a list of butterflies of Tunisia. About 84 species are known from Tunisia.Rotavirus: Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhoea among infants and young children. It is a genus of double-stranded RNA virus in the family Reoviridae.Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical UniversityCongenital chloride diarrhea: Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD, also congenital chloridorrhea or Darrow Gamble syndrome) is a genetic disorder due to an autosomal recessive mutation on chromosome 7. The mutation is in downregulated-in-adenoma (DRA), a gene that encodes a membrane protein of intestinal cells.GA²LENNiigata University

(1/3372) Quantitative analysis of constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced cytochrome P450 1B1 expression in human lymphocytes.

Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) results in a broad spectrum of biological responses, including altered metabolism, disruption of normal hormone signaling pathways, reproductive and developmental effects, and cancer. Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is a dioxin-inducible gene that is active in the formation of 4-hydroxyestradiol, a potentially genotoxic catechol estrogen. Therefore, the analysis of CYP1B1 in humans may be useful in establishing relationships between dioxin exposure and adverse health effects. In this study, we examined the expression of CYP1B1 in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of unexposed individuals using a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Absolute CYP1B1 RNA levels varied more than 30-fold in uncultured mononuclear cells obtained from 10 individuals. In vitro treatment of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes with TCDD for 1-5 days of culture resulted in a peak induction of CYP1B1 after 3 days. The induction of CYP1B1 RNA levels after 3 days of culture was dose-dependent, exhibited a maximum response above 10 nM TCDD, and varied greatly among different individuals. However, the half maximal dose required for this induction was similar between individuals and comparable to that observed in the MCF-7 and HepG2 human cell lines. These observations indicate that CYP1B1 exhibits variable constitutive expression and is inducible in vitro by TCDD in human lymphocytes and that the magnitude of induction varies within the population. These data define the suitability of CYP1B1 for use as a mechanistically based biomarker in ongoing molecular epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to dioxins and related chemicals that bind the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor.  (+info)

(2/3372) Molecular markers demonstrate that the first described multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis outbreak was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

We genetically characterized multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains which caused a nosocomial outbreak of tuberculosis affecting six human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and one HIV-negative staff member (E. Bouvet, E. Casalino, G. Mendoza-Sassi, S. Lariven, E. Vallee, M. Pernet, S. Gottot, and F. Vachon, AIDS 7:1453-1460, 1993). The strains showed all the phenotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium bovis. They presented a high copy number of IS6110, the spacers 40 to 43 in the direct repeat locus, and the mtp40 fragment. They lacked the G-A mutation at position 285 in the oxyR gene and the C-G mutation at position 169 in the pncA gene. These genetic characteristics revealed that these were dysgonic, slow-growing M. tuberculosis strains mimicking the M. bovis phenotype, probably as a consequence of cellular alterations associated with the multidrug resistance. Spoligotyping and IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis confirmed that the outbreak was due to a single strain. However, the IS6110 RFLP pattern of the strain isolated from the last patient, diagnosed three years after the index case, differed slightly from the patterns of the other six strains. A model of a possible genetic event is presented to explain this divergence. This study stresses the value of using several independent molecular markers to identify multidrug-resistant tubercle bacilli.  (+info)

(3/3372) Molecular evidence for heterogeneity of the multiple-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis population in Scotland (1990 to 1997).

Multiple-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-MTB) has been well studied in hospitals or health care institutions and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected populations. However, the characteristics of MDR-MTB in the community have not been well investigated. An understanding of its prevalence and circulation within the community will help to estimate the problem and optimize the strategies for control and prevention of its development and transmission. In this study, MDR-MTB isolates from Scotland collected between 1990 and 1997 were characterized, along with non-drug-resistant isolates. The results showed that they were genetically diverse, suggesting they were unrelated to each other and had probably evolved independently. Several new alleles of rpoB, katG, and ahpC were identified: rpoB codon 525 (ACC-->AAC; Thr525Asn); katG codon 128 (CGG-->CAG; Arg128Gln) and codon 291 (GCT-->CCT; Ala291Pro); and the ahpC synonymous substitution at codon 6 (ATT-->ATC). One of the MDR-MTB isolates from an Asian patient had an IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern very similar to that of the MDR-MTB W strain and had the same drug resistance-related alleles but did not have any epidemiological connection with the W strains. Additionally, a cluster of M. tuberculosis isolates was identified in our collection of 715 clinical isolates; the isolates in this cluster had genetic backgrounds very similar to those of the W strains, one of which had already developed multiple drug resistances. The diverse population of MDR-MTB in Scotland, along with a low incidence of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis, has implications for the control of the organism and prevention of its spread.  (+info)

(4/3372) Analysis with a combination of macrorestriction endonucleases reveals a high degree of polymorphism among Bordetella pertussis isolates in eastern France.

From 1990 to 1996, routine screening for whooping cough identified 399 patients with a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase-positive test result and yielded 69 Bordetella pertussis isolates. None of the patients were fully vaccinated, and most were less than 6 months old. Analysis of total DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after XbaI, SpeI, or DraI macrorestriction yielded 19, 15, and 5 different patterns, respectively, whereas ribotyping failed to demonstrate any strain polymorphism. Discrimination among the isolates was improved by combining the PFGE profiles. Some patterns were more frequent, but the corresponding patients were not clearly epidemiologically related. The patterns for two strains obtained during a 3-month period from patients who were neighbors differed by the length of a single DNA fragment. These data strongly suggest that one type of isolate is widely spread throughout the world and is carried by individuals other than patients who develop a true illness.  (+info)

(5/3372) Use of molecular subtyping to document long-term persistence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae in South Dakota.

Enhanced surveillance of patients with upper respiratory symptoms in a Northern Plains community revealed that approximately 4% of them were infected by toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae of both mitis and gravis biotypes, showing that the organism is still circulating in the United States. Toxigenic C. diphtheriae was isolated from five members of four households. Four molecular subtyping methods-ribotyping, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and single-strand conformation polymorphism-were used to molecularly characterize these strains and compare them to 17 archival South Dakota strains dating back to 1973 through 1983 and to 5 isolates collected from residents of diverse regions of the United States. Ribotyping and RAPD clearly demonstrated the household transmission of isolates and provided precise information on the circulation of several distinct strains within three households. By MEE, most recent and archival South Dakota strains were identified as closely related and clustered within the newly identified ET (electrophoretic type) 215 complex. Furthermore, three recent South Dakota isolates and eight archival South Dakota isolates were indistinguishable by both ribotyping and RAPD. All of these molecular methods showed that recent South Dakota isolates and archival South Dakota isolates were more closely related to each other than to the C. diphtheriae strains isolated in other parts of the United States or worldwide. The data also supported the improbability of importation of C. diphtheriae into this area and rather strongly suggest the long-term persistence of the organism in this region.  (+info)

(6/3372) Geographic distribution and evolution of Sindbis virus in Australia.

The molecular epidemiology and evolution of Sindbis (SIN) virus in Australia was examined. Several SIN virus strains isolated from other countries were also included in the analysis. Two regions of the virus genome were sequenced including a 418 bp region of the E2 gene and a 484 bp region containing part of the junction region and the 5' end of the C gene. Analysis of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence data from 40 SIN virus isolates clearly separated the Paleoarctic/Ethiopian and Oriental/Australian genetic types of SIN virus. Examination of the Australian strains showed a temporal rather than geographic relationship. This is consistent with the virus having migratory birds as the major vertebrate host, as it allows for movement of virus over vast areas of the continent over a relatively short period of time. The results suggest that the virus is being periodically redistributed over the continent from an enzootic focus of evolving SIN virus. However, SIN virus strains isolated from mosquitoes collected in the south-west of Australia appear to represent a new SIN virus lineage, which is distinct from the Paleoarctic/Ethiopian and Oriental/Australian lineages. Given the widespread geographic dispersal of the Paleoarctic/Ethiopian and Oriental/Australian lineages, it is surprising that the South-west genetic type is so restricted in its area of circulation. Nucleotide sequence data from the C gene of the prototype strain of the alphavirus Whataroa were also determined. This virus was found to be genetically distinct from the SIN virus isolates included in the present study; however, it is clearly SIN-like and appears to have evolved from a SIN-like ancestral virus.  (+info)

(7/3372) Molecular typing of Salmonella serotype Thompson strains isolated from human and animal sources.

One-hundred-and-thirteen isolates of Salmonella serotype Thompson from diverse sources in seven countries were characterized by PvuII ribotyping and IS200 fingerprinting. Ten PvuII ribotypes were observed. The predominant PvuII ribotype 1 represented a major clone of world-wide distribution but was not found in Australia; PvuII ribotypes 2 and 3 represented minor clones. HincII ribotyping discriminated subtypes within PvuII ribotype 1: HincII ribotype 1 was distributed widely but HincII ribotype 2 was found mainly in Scottish isolates. None of 101 isolates of PvuII ribotypes 1-3 contained copies of IS200. All 12 isolates of PvuII ribotypes 4-10 were from Australia and 7 of them contained copies of IS200 of 5 different profiles. These results suggest the existence of at least two lineages of Salmonella Thompson with a different geographical distribution. The finding that most isolates from man and poultry in Scotland belonged to the same ribotype (PvuII 1/HincII 2) and were IS200-negative suggests that poultry is an important source of human infection in Scotland.  (+info)

(8/3372) Molecular epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus in The Gambia.

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in The Gambia occurs seasonally in association with the rainy season. This study examined the genetic variability of RSV isolates from four consecutive epidemics from 1993-6. Each epidemic was made up of a number of variants which were replaced in subsequent epidemics. Analysis of attachment (G) protein gene sequences showed that isolates were closely related to those observed in the rest of the world. However, many isolates from 1993 and 1994 were unlike other isolates observed in the developed world during this period and were more similar to isolates from 1984 in Europe. In addition, the most commonly observed genotype in the UK in the 1990s was not detected in The Gambia during this period.  (+info)